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NEWS
March 28, 1996
FireLineboro: Lineboro units responded at 6: 15 p.m. Tuesday to a field fire along Fiscal Road. Units were out 30 minutes.Pub Date: 3/28/96
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | March 29, 2007
The Internet can make life a lot more convenient for blind users - when it works. It's as frustrating as a roadblock when Web sites aren't designed to play nicely with software that reads text and instructions aloud. As the world has migrated online, advocates for visually impaired people have pushed hard to make Web access truly accessible - an electronic equivalent of the ramps that give Americans in wheelchairs a way into buildings. The Baltimore-based National Federation of the Blind in particular has encouraged, cajoled and sued, stepping up its efforts in recent years because it believes that people who can't fully use the Internet can no longer fully function at school, work and home.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie, Sun Staff | September 25, 1996
The Baltimore Sun Co. launched a World Wide Web site yesterday, embarking on a business venture it hopes will attract users and advertisers with a particularly community-oriented, interactive design. Dubbed SunSpot, the free Web site can help people accomplish many things: buy a used 1988 Ford Taurus in Annapolis, find a good restaurant in East Baltimore, locate other people with a special interest in speaking Italian or dig up a 1984 stat on Cal Ripken. Among its offerings is an electronic version of the classified ads, the day's news, real-time sports updates and a local calendar of events.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SOCOLOW | May 9, 2006
Congress wants to change the Internet. This is news to most people because the major news media have not actively pursued the story. Yet both the House and Senate commerce committees are promoting new rules governing the manner by which most Americans receive the Web. Congressional passage of new rules is widely anticipated, as is President Bush's signature. Once this happens, the Internet will change before your eyes. The proposed House legislation, the Communications Opportunity, Promotion and Enhancement Act (COPE)
NEWS
September 10, 1996
The World Wide Web address for Plum Blossom Kimono, which sells vintage clothing, was incorrectly listed in Saturday's Today sections. The correct address is: http: //www.charm.net/kimonoPub Date: 9/10/96
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | March 26, 1997
What does Campbell's Soup's familiar label mean to you? Express your feelings artistically and you could win a grand prize of $10,000 and 100 shares of Campbell's stock. There are categories for professionals, amateurs and youths, and the expression can be a bit of creative writing or various kinds of art. For information, call toll-free (888) SOUPERART, check the World Wide Web at www.Campbellsoups.com, or write Campbell's Entry Form, P.O. Box 654, Sayreville, N.J. 08871-0654.Pub Date: 3/26/97
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1998
We're looking for people who listen to baseball radio $l broadcasts on the World Wide Web. If you're a Baltimore resident who listens to another team's radio broadcasts on the Web or know Orioles fans who listen to Web broadcasts of O's games in other states or countries, please let us know.Just send e-mail to pluggedialtsun.com or leave a voice message on SunDial by calling 410-783-1800 and entering code 6187.Pub Date: 6/29/98
BUSINESS
May 10, 1997
Results of the February 1997 Maryland Bar Exam are now available from SunFax. You must have a fax machine to use this service. Call 410-332-6123 and enter document code 5600. When the attendant asks for the phone number of your fax machine, please remember to include the area code.If you're connected to the World Wide Web, you can find the Bar Exam list on SunSpot. Just point your browser to http: //www.sunspot.net/bar/.Pub Date: 5/10/97
FEATURES
January 25, 1996
Linda Ellerbee, gadfly of TV journalism, is teaming up with Microsoft for a monthly interview "show" on the Internet."If this is the way journalism is headed, I don't want to be the last kid on the block to get there," Ms. Ellerbee said.The transcribed conversation of "Encarta on the Record" will be relayed to a World Wide Web site, as will a video image of her and a guest that will be updated every eight seconds.If users have the right equipment, they can hear the soundtrack, too.The web site is http://www.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1996
Bar examThe list of candidates who passed the Maryland Bar Exam and the Maryland Attorney Exam is now available by fax from SUNFAX and on the World Wide Web from SunSpot.To receive the list by fax, dial (410) 332-6123 and enter code 5600 when the attendant answers. You must have access to a fax machine and a touch-tone phone to use this service. To find the list on the Web, point your browser to http: //www.sunspot.net/bar/.` Pub Date: 11/16/96
ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS GAITHER and CHRIS GAITHER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2005
The question nagged Harvey Levin all summer: Is the Internet a place where TV careers go to die -- or be reborn? After Telepictures Productions pulled the plug on Levin's syndicated newsmagazine Celebrity Justice, he was approached about starting an entertainment news Web site with America Online. "My initial reaction was, I couldn't be less interested," Levin recalled. "I thought, I'm going to do more television. Why would I do Internet?" But he continued to ponder the benefits of online distribution: younger viewers, faster turnaround, lower overhead, not to mention exposure to the more than 110 million people who visit AOL Web sites each month.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | January 4, 2005
CHICAGO - The Internet is an amazing creation, but not an entirely benign one. The upside is that you can post and find material that is accessible to countless people around the world. The downside is that you can post and find material that is accessible to countless people around the world. That drawback is no longer a secret to the Navy wife whose husband, a member of the elite SEALS, brought back photos of SEALS with Iraqi prisoners, some of which suggested that the inmates were being abused.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Moran and John Moran,HARTFORD COURANT | July 11, 2004
For most of us, the World Wide Web is worldwide in name only. The vast majority of Web sites we visit are in the United States. Occasionally, we might happen onto a site in Canada or England, or perhaps an English-language newspaper in some other country. So it might come as a surprise to learn that non-English-speaking parts of the Internet are soaring in popularity. The dot-com boom may be only a memory here, but it's just getting started internationally. Yet as recent business deals show, this phenomenon is well known to big Web businesses.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Wide-open free speech remains the rule on the Internet, the Supreme Court said yesterday, as it barred enforcing a federal law that would make it a crime for commercial Web sites to post sexually explicit material where children and teenagers could see it. The 5-4 ruling sends a message to parents that it is up to them to monitor their family computer and, if necessary, install software filters to screen out pornography. The court said the free-speech rights of adult users of the Internet should not be sacrificed if there are other ways to protect children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
Do you have something to tell the world? Well, if you haven't put your ideas on the World Wide Web, you're missing a revolution in personal communication that has changed the way we share our lives and dreams. Since the general public became interested in the Internet in the mid-1990s, millions of average Joes and Janes without technical backgrounds have taken the plunge into personal Web page creation. They post family photos, resumes, wares for sale and just about anything else that might interest neighbors next door or people half-way around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
Most of us learn to fish from a dad or uncle who threads a worm on a hook when we're preschoolers -- teaching us patience in the midst of anticipation of that first tug on our lines. But for those who want to immerse themselves in pursuit of piscatorial prey without a traditional mentor -- such as 40-year-olds with an interest in learning to fly fish -- the Web is a treasure trove of information and tips for beginners and experts alike. Like many hobbies that find their way onto the Internet, fishing has enthusiastic webmasters who are fanatical participants in the sport.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1996
Just add nails: Brady & Sun Inc., a manufacturer of prefabricated room additions and sun rooms, has started selling home offices. The rooms are pre-wired for computers, TVs and other office essentials, and they also have built-in office furniture, book shelves and paneling. The company, based in Worcester, Mass., says an office can be installed in less than a day.Really worldwide: The beauty of the World Wide Web is that it links millions of computer users around the globe. But it also means that someone in Baltimore who accesses a Web site created in Tokyo might not be able to read it. Now, software makers are beginning to come up with answers.
FEATURES
August 4, 1999
More and more parents are surfing the Web with their children, only to drown in the flow of information out there. To help you and your child get "wired," here are some useful sites on the World Wide Web that can be help build family togetherness and promote learning.When using the Web together, have your child do as much of the clicking and pointing as possible. In that way, she will learn how the Internet is used and it will be a fun and enjoyable experience for both of you.* The www.scholastic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 2001
Brewster Kahle never has thought small. So it's no surprise that his latest venture is as vast as the entire Internet: an archive of the World Wide Web that's at once enormous and personal and an instructive parable about what we used to call the new economy. Having become wealthy through a variety of Internet ventures over the years, Kahle in 1996 took up collecting: Web pages -- at last count, more than 10 billion of them. His Internet Archive project takes regular snapshots of millions of pages and, until recently, stored them like photos in the attic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | June 26, 2000
Whenever the cash register at my supermarket is printing my receipt at the end of the checkout line, a little gadget attached to it spits out a coupon. Usually it's good for 50 cents off something I've just bought, or a discount on a similar item. This is an example of good marketing. The supermarket knows who I am - I use a credit card and have shopped there for years. With its computer tracking what I buy, it tailors its coupons to my buying habits and offers me an inducement to return.
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