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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 25, 2011
Bedford Groves, a retired Washington College administrator who earned two Purple Hearts in the infantry during World War II, died of heart disease March 15 at Chester River Manor. He was 90 and lived in Chestertown. He was born on a farm at Turners Creek near Kennedyville on the Eastern Shore. His father died when he was 14. To help support his six sisters and mother, he worked on a neighbor's farm in the early morning and hitchhiked to Chestertown High School, where he graduated in 1937.
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NEWS
October 5, 2014
In the wake of President Barack Obama's declaration of war on ISIS and the fact that several dozen ISIS members with American citizenship are believed to have already re-entered the country, along with the near simultaneous multiple failures of the Secret Service to properly protect Mr. Obama, I believe it is time to do with the White House what was done during World War II. During that era the roof of the White House was protected by both sandbagged machine...
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NEWS
September 15, 2014
Recently a friend and I had a stopover at Philadelphia International Airport, and as we walked toward our terminal gate we saw a commotion ahead with American flags and the sound of applause. To my delight, it turned out to be a group of World War II veterans returning from a convention in Florida. One of the veterans' peers announced to the crowd the branch in which each man served; to our surprise, a few of them had served in as many as three branches. Most of the veterans were wheelchair-bound, but about 10 to 15 of them brought up the rear sans assistance.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
The widow of Baltimore author Tom Clancy is battling her late husband's lawyer over $6 million in taxes she says she shouldn't owe on her share of Clancy's $82 million estate, which includes a World War II tank, a $65 million stake in the Orioles and a mansion on the Chesapeake Bay. Alexandra Clancy is seeking to oust Baltimore lawyer J.W. Thompson "Topper" Webb as executor of Tom Clancy's will, accusing Webb of a mistake that adds unnecessarily to...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
William L. More, a retired Exxon marketing representative who fought during World War II with the 4th Marine Division in some of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific, died Saturday of respiratory failure at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home. He was 90. Nearly 40 years would pass before William Lynn More could bring himself to talk about Iwo Jima, the 36-day battle in 1945 for a rugged, uninhabited eight-square-mile Pacific island of gray volcanic sand and rock, where 6,800 Americans died and 26,000 were wounded.
NEWS
By Kevin Leonard | April 10, 2014
With most of the young men off to war, the nation's industries turned to another source of labor to supply the necessities to fight World War II: women. The vast majority of the nation pulled together to support the war effort that began in 1941, and women of all ages were asked to shoulder the manufacturing load for the duration of the war. Almost 3 million women answered the call. Out of this workforce the character of Rosie the Riveter was born. The term was first used in a hit song in 1942.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
Joseph "Jerry" Hankoff, a retired insurance agency owner and a decorated World War II bombardier-navigator, died April 24 of complications from dementia at the Edgewater Pointe Estates nursing facility in Boca Raton, Fla. He was 91 and had lived in Pikesville. Born in Baltimore and raised on Linden Avenue, he was a 1938 City College graduate. He attended the University of Baltimore and studied law and accounting. He enlisted in the Army Air Forces in 1943 and trained as a navigator-bombardier.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
The U.S. National World War II Memorial opened on the Mall in Washington in 2004 - too late for most of the war's veterans. At the time of the memorial's dedication, it was estimated that only a quarter of the 16 million Americans who served in the war were still alive. Today, 68 years after the war's end, the Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that more than 600 World War II veterans die each day. Which is why three Southwest Airlines chartered flights, bearing 200 veterans from New England and New York, arrived at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport early Saturday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
John Morgan "Nemo" Robinson, a retired operator of a Chesapeake Bay summer resort and decorated World War II veteran, died Saturday of a heart attack at Anne Arundel Medical Center after undergoing brain surgery a week earlier. The Severna Park resident was 90. Born and raised in Catonsville, he was a 1938 graduate of Catonsville High School and spent another year at Polytechnic Institute. He gained the nickname Nemo as a child because he had long blond curls like a lion in the "Little Nemo" comic strip.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
John C. Ford Jr., who as a young World War II cryptanalyst was part of a team whose work resulted in the shooting down of the bomber carrying Japanese Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto, died Wednesday from respiratory failure at a son's Arnold home. He was 94. The son of an oil salesman and a homemaker, John Cecil Ford Jr. was born in Federal Hill and raised in Catonsville, where he ran track and played lacrosse at Catonsville High School. He graduated from there in 1935. "He was at the Baltimore Business College at the time of Pearl Harbor, and he was about to be drafted into the Army.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
Recently a friend and I had a stopover at Philadelphia International Airport, and as we walked toward our terminal gate we saw a commotion ahead with American flags and the sound of applause. To my delight, it turned out to be a group of World War II veterans returning from a convention in Florida. One of the veterans' peers announced to the crowd the branch in which each man served; to our surprise, a few of them had served in as many as three branches. Most of the veterans were wheelchair-bound, but about 10 to 15 of them brought up the rear sans assistance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Berean E. "Bill" Talbert, who founded a Baltimore County landscaping company and fought in Europe during World War II, died Tuesday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 93. The son of Richard H. Talbert, a textile mill worker, and Stella M. Talbert, a homemaker, Berean Earl Talbert was born and raised in Leaksville, N.C., which is now Eden, N.C. He was a 1937 graduate of Leaksville High School. During World War II, Mr. Talbert served with Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army in Europe, where he was a fire control director with a Howitzer artillery unit.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Dorothy L. Abrams, a registered nurse and World War II veteran, died July 7 at Northwest Hospital of complications from a stroke. She was 93. The daughter of William Weatherington, an Illinois Central Railroad worker, and Pearl Rudd Weatherington, a homemaker, Dorothy Louise Weatherington was born and raised in Paducah, Ky., where she graduated in 1939 from Heath High School. After earning her nursing degree from the Baptist Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., she joined the Navy Nurse Corps shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and went on active duty in 1942.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Thomas D. Fantom Jr., a retired civil engineer and World War II Army Air Forces veteran, died July 23 at Arden Courts in Pikesville of complications from a fall. He was 91. The son of Thomas D. Fantom Sr., a civil engineer, and Alice E. Fantom, a homemaker, Thomas Davis Fantom Jr. was born on Palmer Avenue in the city's Pimlico neighborhood, and moved with his family to Granite during the Depression. He was a 1940 graduate of Catonsville High School. Mr. Fantom enlisted in the Army Air Forces the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 22, 2014
Humanity faces its biggest refugee crisis since World War II, and Rep. Andy Harris, the Republican congressman from Maryland's 1st District, pledges to do everything in his power to keep a tiny fraction of Central American children out of a shelter in Carroll County. Harris is a doctor, but apparently not a compassionate one. Maybe he should start his own organization as a conservative counterweight to rampant humanitarianism. He could call it Doctors With Borders, Medecins Avec Frontieres.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
In the photo from 1943, Tech. Sgt. Charles A. Bode and his fellow airmen gaze into the camera, some shirtless, some smiling, looking to modern eyes like cast members of the musical "South Pacific. " But the B-24 bomber crew would soon embark on a very real mission during the intense combat for the Pacific in World War II. The men took off from a port in New Guinea on Nov. 20, 1943; after a routine radio check, the 11 crewmen were never seen or heard from again. The mission, in a sense, finally ends for the 23-year-old Bode on Friday afternoon, when the Highlandtown man is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Don Casey has attended every annual reunion of the 238th Combat Engineer Battalion since the first in 1947. He shares stories of the battalion's battles in World War II, including its part in D-Day, the airborne and beach assault on Normandy, France, 70 years ago. The 238th is staging its annual reunion this weekend in Columbia, and while he was in town, Casey was interviewed by students from Howard Community College on Thursday as part of a...
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 13, 2014
Just two pages into the book "Unbroken," its protagonist is in the water, hiding beneath the deteriorating life raft in which he has been drifting across the Pacific Ocean for almost a month. Overhead, Japanese bombers are circling back to strafe him a second time. And sharks are approaching from below. Death is coming for him from two directions, and your impulse is to verify that this is not a novel, not some outlandish fiction from the Indiana Jones School of Narrow Escapes.
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