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By Jonah Goldberg | August 25, 2014
Does the president think the world is a TV show? One of the things you learn watching television as a kid is that the hero wins. No matter how dire things look, the star is going to be OK. MacGyver always defuses the bomb with some saltwater taffy before the timer reaches zero. There was no way Fonzie was going to mess up his water-ski jump and get devoured by sharks. Life doesn't actually work like that. That's one reason HBO's "Game of Thrones" is so compelling. Despite being set in an absurd fantasy world of giants, dragons and ice zombies, it's more realistic than a lot of dramas set in a more plausible universe in at least one regard.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 25, 2014
Does the president think the world is a TV show? One of the things you learn watching television as a kid is that the hero wins. No matter how dire things look, the star is going to be OK. MacGyver always defuses the bomb with some saltwater taffy before the timer reaches zero. There was no way Fonzie was going to mess up his water-ski jump and get devoured by sharks. Life doesn't actually work like that. That's one reason HBO's "Game of Thrones" is so compelling. Despite being set in an absurd fantasy world of giants, dragons and ice zombies, it's more realistic than a lot of dramas set in a more plausible universe in at least one regard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Ralph Steadman says he likes the Ralph Steadman of "For No Good Reason. " And that, perhaps, is a problem. "I think it makes me too nice - too pleasant, yes," says the 78-year-old British cartoonist whose manic style long served as the perfect complement for Hunter S. Thompson's gonzo ravings. "I think I should be a little grumpier. I should say something like Scrooge - you know, 'Bah, humbug!'" A delighted chuckle follows, leaving it an open question whether the subject of director Charlie Paul's 15-years-in-the-making documentary, which opens today, really means what he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Ralph Steadman says he likes the Ralph Steadman of "For No Good Reason. " And that, perhaps, is a problem. "I think it makes me too nice - too pleasant, yes," says the 78-year-old British cartoonist whose manic style long served as the perfect complement for Hunter S. Thompson's gonzo ravings. "I think I should be a little grumpier. I should say something like Scrooge - you know, 'Bah, humbug!'" A delighted chuckle follows, leaving it an open question whether the subject of director Charlie Paul's 15-years-in-the-making documentary, which opens today, really means what he says.
NEWS
By Ron McClamrock | January 16, 2005
IN THE WAKE of the disaster in the Indian Ocean, something interesting has arisen: Commentators have turned to philosophical consideration of the bearing of such events on belief in God and in what kind of God can be reconciled with such events. In the political context of today's United States, it's hardly shocking to see issues of religion in the public dialogue and debate. But religion usually arises in the context of issues of fairness to various religious views, entanglements of law and religion or how often religious themes do or don't occur in contemporary entertainment.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | August 1, 2008
Had it not been liberals, it would have been something else. Let's grant that from the beginning. Broken people, after all, can always find some equally broken rationale for the carnage they cause. And the brokenness of 58-year-old Jim D. Adkisson can hardly be doubted after he walked into a Unitarian Universalist Church in Knoxville, Tenn., on Sunday and, according to police, shot eight people, killing two. He might as well have said he did it because he didn't like the color of the building, a black cat crossed his path or the voices in his head thought it a good idea.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
With the grand stage of the Olympics over, the unfulfilled Russian President Vladimir Putin has plunged onto the world stage with a grand finale. The world is shocked by the unprovoked attack on Ukraine under the guise of three lies: First, a prior agreed-to military exercise, second, an invitation of the "legitimate government" and third, unsubstantiated threats to Russians and Russian language speakers in Ukraine. All three of these arguments have been clearly and unequivocally exposed as myths.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
I try to follow the political discussion in the U.S. and am amazed how much effort it takes even to begin to be well-informed. If you are serious about being informed, you can't be the least bit lazy and depend on a couple of pundits to shape your world view. You have to get out there and study the people you disagree with - in their own words, not the pundits' words. Information comes at you like a fire hose and you better not be off to the side sipping out of a dripping garden hose.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | November 10, 2004
THE PURITANS WON. Just like the faithful who fled England some 350 years ago, voters placed their faith -- and government -- under God. Proving what conservative pundits claimed for the past year, the 2004 election showed that Americans care as much -- or more -- about the spiritual and moral health of the nation as they do about its social and economic well-being. For those feeling as blue as the votes they cast, the lesson is clear: Religion and values are as much a part of the political calculus as tax cuts, health care and national defense.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Like the children's book character Eloise, who grew up in New York City's Plaza Hotel, Patrick Sutton had a rarefied childhood. The son of noted New York travel writer Horace Sutton and his fashion model wife, the Baltimore interior designer spent his formative years in Europe's most glamorous cities and in its sumptuous hotels. "We were traveling all over the world and all of the cities were wining and dining him," said Sutton during an interview in his Federal Hill offices. "Imagine.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 14, 2014
"If all you have is a hammer," the old saying goes, "everything looks like a nail. " Left unsaid is the fact that the real problem isn't the possession of a hammer, but the certitude that all you need is the hammer. In other words, it's a failure of the imagination -- which is a kind of arrogance -- that's really to blame. "I've got my hammer, and that's all I need. Besides, have you ever seen a problem that didn't look like a nail?" This is a version of what academics call "confirmation bias" -- the tendency to accept only the facts that buttress your closely held views.
NEWS
March 4, 2014
With the grand stage of the Olympics over, the unfulfilled Russian President Vladimir Putin has plunged onto the world stage with a grand finale. The world is shocked by the unprovoked attack on Ukraine under the guise of three lies: First, a prior agreed-to military exercise, second, an invitation of the "legitimate government" and third, unsubstantiated threats to Russians and Russian language speakers in Ukraine. All three of these arguments have been clearly and unequivocally exposed as myths.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 20, 2012
The shooting rampage at a movie theater in Colorado that killed 12 and injured more than 50 is enough to make adults uneasy. Many forget that it can have just as deep of an effect on children. Psychologist Tiffany Garner said there are ways parents can help ease children's fears.  The coordinator of autism assessment services  in the division of pediatric psychology & neuropsychology atMt. Washington Pediatric Hospital offers her tips below. How can an event like this impact children?
NEWS
February 23, 2012
I try to follow the political discussion in the U.S. and am amazed how much effort it takes even to begin to be well-informed. If you are serious about being informed, you can't be the least bit lazy and depend on a couple of pundits to shape your world view. You have to get out there and study the people you disagree with - in their own words, not the pundits' words. Information comes at you like a fire hose and you better not be off to the side sipping out of a dripping garden hose.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2010
Like the children's book character Eloise, who grew up in New York City's Plaza Hotel, Patrick Sutton had a rarefied childhood. The son of noted New York travel writer Horace Sutton and his fashion model wife, the Baltimore interior designer spent his formative years in Europe's most glamorous cities and in its sumptuous hotels. "We were traveling all over the world and all of the cities were wining and dining him," said Sutton during an interview in his Federal Hill offices. "Imagine.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | June 9, 2009
Jurors are expected to begin deliberations Tuesday in a federal death penalty case set deep within the "violent world of drug dealing, intimidation and murder" of a tiny section of Northeast Baltimore, prosecutors say, and the alleged drug ring that ran it, selling heroin and crack under one name: Special. The three defendants - Marvin Gilbert, 34; James "Miami" Dinkins, 37; and Darron "Moo Man" Goods, 24 - are accused, in various combinations, of drug conspiracy and multiple killings, including the shooting deaths of two witnesses, one of them on Thanksgiving Day in 2006.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 20, 2012
The shooting rampage at a movie theater in Colorado that killed 12 and injured more than 50 is enough to make adults uneasy. Many forget that it can have just as deep of an effect on children. Psychologist Tiffany Garner said there are ways parents can help ease children's fears.  The coordinator of autism assessment services  in the division of pediatric psychology & neuropsychology atMt. Washington Pediatric Hospital offers her tips below. How can an event like this impact children?
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 21, 2006
Last Sunday's column on mandatory public service -- civil, military and foreign humanitarian -- for all U.S. citizens resulted in a plump stack of e-mails and numerous phone calls, and the reaction was passionately divided. The readers I heard from either love the idea and think it's long overdue or reject it as forced labor. The latter view -- extreme libertarian -- holds that it's unconstitutional to force Americans to do anything at any time, including pay taxes or wear desert camo, so there's not much room for argument.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | August 1, 2008
Had it not been liberals, it would have been something else. Let's grant that from the beginning. Broken people, after all, can always find some equally broken rationale for the carnage they cause. And the brokenness of 58-year-old Jim D. Adkisson can hardly be doubted after he walked into a Unitarian Universalist Church in Knoxville, Tenn., on Sunday and, according to police, shot eight people, killing two. He might as well have said he did it because he didn't like the color of the building, a black cat crossed his path or the voices in his head thought it a good idea.
NEWS
May 14, 2008
Perspectives from the Israeli and Arab media on Israel's 60th anniversary: "Have we gone mad? Has something gone wrong with our collective mind? The state of Israel is about to mark 60 years of independence in an atmosphere of bitterness, depression and public reluctance 'to waste the money on celebrations.' The state of Israel, whose existence, growth and prosperity are perceived by so many in the world as one of the most impressive and influential successes of modern times, is sinking in melancholy as if it were a total failure.
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