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By LYLE DENNISTON | September 4, 1994
Washington. -- Unhappily for President Clinton, American history from the days when he was a child is repeating itself -- almost exactly. A fight waged with real bitterness in the late 1940s and early 1950s is warming up again in Congress, exposing anew the deep fear that grips some Americans anytime they contemplate being ruled by a world government run by foreigners.This time, the fight focuses on the proposed World Trade Organization (WTO), a would-be super government agency that is supposed to be able to settle global trade disputes more efficiently.
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NEWS
By Jerry Hingle | June 6, 2013
The Farm Bill currently making its way through Congress is important to everyone who lives and works in Maryland because it provides critical support to one of the pillars of the state's economy: international trade. The bill, strongly debated in Congress since it was introduced in May 2012 following the expiration of the 2008 U.S. Farm Bill, helps keep the doors open to exports of America's food and agriculture. The debate over this nearly $1 trillion bill is a perfect example of gridlock in Congress: Because it requires balance among so many divisive priorities, including public support of our nation's farmers and ranchers, conservationism, social welfare and the budget deficit, it is a microcosm of our federal budgeting process and requires Congress to approach the situation with a willingness to compromise.
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NEWS
May 18, 1998
THE PREDICTED clash between environmental protection and free trade under the new World Trade Organization has become reality. Free trade appears to be the winner over endangered species.A WTO tribunal in Geneva last month sanctioned the United States for upholding a 1989 law that bans shrimp imports from countries whose fishermen fail to protect endangered sea turtles by using nets with escape hatches. South Asian countries complained that the United States violated the free trade agreement by insisting on a certain method of capture.
NEWS
By Peter Bowe | May 18, 2010
For 125 years, Baltimore has been home to Ellicott Dredges, a heavy equipment manufacturer and the world's oldest and largest builder of medium-sized cutter suction dredges, which are used for everything from harbor maintenance to beach restoration and environmental cleanups. As a manufacturer of such a specialized product, we have to look for opportunities to market anywhere there may be a demand — which is usually outside the state of Maryland and often far beyond the borders of the United States.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - Global trade declined last year for the first time since 1982 and will barely recover this year as economic growth remains sluggish, the World Trade Organization said yesterday. "The lowest growth in output in more than two decades and a decrease in trade flows represented a major reversal" from 2000, when trade surged 11 percent, its fastest pace in a decade, the WTO said in a report. Trade dropped 4 percent in value last year, to $6 trillion, and fell 1 percent in volume, pulled down by the two biggest economies, those of the United States and Japan, the WTO said.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2008
Chiquita Brands International Inc. Shares gained 44 cents, closing at $17.08. The produce distributor is poised to gain from a World Trade Organization ruling against the European Union's import tariffs for bananas.
NEWS
November 4, 2001
THE WORLD Trade Organization meeting Nov. 9 to 13 in Doha, Qatar, on the Persian Gulf, must go on as scheduled for the good of the world. Especially those parts of it called the Islamic World and the Third World. One reason is to overcome the terrorism that has spread pessimism and curtailed daily life in the United States and the developed world. A second is to restore confidence and world solidarity to the Islamic world, including the host country. A third is to make progress, stalled at the last WTO meeting in Seattle in 1999, in bringing benefits of the global economy to the world's poor.
NEWS
April 8, 1999
THE REST of the world does not stop when a crisis such as Kosovo preoccupies Washington. The long-planned visit of China's Prime Minister Zhu Rongji to Washington, today and tomorrow, takes place as if nothing else was going on.Negotiations at a lower level are narrowing the gap that prevents the United States from agreeing to China's joining the World Trade Organization. The visit was meant to seal such an agreement.Mr. Zhu is the smiling face of Chinese communism. The third-ranking member of Beijing's hierarchy, he is an economic reformer and the one who best knows how to talk to Americans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2000
DAVOS, Switzerland -- Amid a sudden wave of angst among corporate and political leaders about the growing gap between rich and poor, President Clinton appealed to them yesterday to make global trade work for the poor. In what amounted to his gospel on globalization, Clinton told an audience of chief executives and national leaders attending the World Economic Forum that if the economic elite who had created, managed and benefited from globalization did not listen to the concerns of those left out, protectionism would return.
NEWS
December 9, 1999
Seattle protesters had good reasons to oppose the WTOAs an opponent of the World Trade Organization, I was very perturbed after reading Jay Hancock's account of "Who are these protesters and what do they have against the WTO?" ("From free trade to free-for-all," Dec. 2).I expected to read an interview with critics of the WTO; instead, a reporter answered his own questions.Two WTO opponents were identified in the article -- the Teamsters union and the Friends of the Earth. But no opponent was actually quoted.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2008
Chiquita Brands International Inc. Shares gained 44 cents, closing at $17.08. The produce distributor is poised to gain from a World Trade Organization ruling against the European Union's import tariffs for bananas.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
THE PRESIDENT had to go to Capital Hill to lobby for it. Sugar and textile producers had to be given guarantees. All manner of pork had to be doled out. But late Wednesday, the administration pushed through the Central American Free Trade Agreement -- by two votes. This fight was about politics, not economics. Trade with the six nations covered by CAFTA is relatively small. Almost 80 percent of their exports to the United States already enter without tariffs. In mercantile terms -- by opening the region to U.S. exports -- America likely gains modestly.
FEATURES
By Kevin Crust and Kevin Crust,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2004
Changing the world one prank at a time" is the tagline for the documentary The Yes Men, but the word prank doesn't really do them justice. Smart and amusing, the film is a record of activists Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno as they appeared at conferences around the world impersonating members of the World Trade Organization. We follow the Yes Men to Finland, Australia and Plattsburgh, N.Y., where, dressed in thrift store suits and armed with Powerpoint presentations, they aim to subvert corporate globalization while managing to have a good time.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 30, 2003
GENEVA - The World Trade Organization agreed to rule whether a European Union ban on new genetically engineered crops is illegal, after a complaint by the United States, Canada and Argentina. The world's three biggest growers of gene-modified seeds asked the trade arbiter to order the EU to lift a ban on approving crop varieties that a French-led group of six countries put up in 1998. The EU says the barrier will disappear with new laws requiring that products with so-called genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, be labeled and traced through the food chain.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - Global trade declined last year for the first time since 1982 and will barely recover this year as economic growth remains sluggish, the World Trade Organization said yesterday. "The lowest growth in output in more than two decades and a decrease in trade flows represented a major reversal" from 2000, when trade surged 11 percent, its fastest pace in a decade, the WTO said in a report. Trade dropped 4 percent in value last year, to $6 trillion, and fell 1 percent in volume, pulled down by the two biggest economies, those of the United States and Japan, the WTO said.
NEWS
November 4, 2001
THE WORLD Trade Organization meeting Nov. 9 to 13 in Doha, Qatar, on the Persian Gulf, must go on as scheduled for the good of the world. Especially those parts of it called the Islamic World and the Third World. One reason is to overcome the terrorism that has spread pessimism and curtailed daily life in the United States and the developed world. A second is to restore confidence and world solidarity to the Islamic world, including the host country. A third is to make progress, stalled at the last WTO meeting in Seattle in 1999, in bringing benefits of the global economy to the world's poor.
FEATURES
By Kevin Crust and Kevin Crust,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2004
Changing the world one prank at a time" is the tagline for the documentary The Yes Men, but the word prank doesn't really do them justice. Smart and amusing, the film is a record of activists Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno as they appeared at conferences around the world impersonating members of the World Trade Organization. We follow the Yes Men to Finland, Australia and Plattsburgh, N.Y., where, dressed in thrift store suits and armed with Powerpoint presentations, they aim to subvert corporate globalization while managing to have a good time.
NEWS
July 29, 2005
THE PRESIDENT had to go to Capital Hill to lobby for it. Sugar and textile producers had to be given guarantees. All manner of pork had to be doled out. But late Wednesday, the administration pushed through the Central American Free Trade Agreement -- by two votes. This fight was about politics, not economics. Trade with the six nations covered by CAFTA is relatively small. Almost 80 percent of their exports to the United States already enter without tariffs. In mercantile terms -- by opening the region to U.S. exports -- America likely gains modestly.
BUSINESS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 13, 2000
BEIJING - After meeting with Chinese officials for nearly six hours yesterday, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky sought to allay concerns that China's planned entry into the World Trade Organization was running off the rails. Barshefsky said Premier Zhu Rongji, who overseas the nation's economy, made it clear yesterday that China was not trying to backtrack on agreements it had made in the past year to open its markets to foreign businesses in a bid to enter the WTO. Zhu made an "absolute emphatic declaration that China is not and will not back away from its bilateral commitments," the trade representative said in a press briefing at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 26, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- Forget the Frenchman who drove his tractor into a McDonald's. Ignore the protesters last week in Prague demanding that we "Ban the [World] Bank." The debate over how to deal with the downside of globalization is finally getting interesting. Serious people are seeking concrete ways to counter growing inequality in an interconnected world. This shift is healthy. For too long, debates over the impact of open markets have been dominated by a sterile squabble -- between those who claim the free-market gospel is sufficient by itself to produce prosperity and those who fear a wide open world.
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