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NEWS
August 6, 2010
It seems to me that the there are many persons, including the author of the editorial ("Freedom and religion," Aug.5), that have very short or convenient memories. I want to quote a section of the text: "That's just the opposite of the fanaticism and fear motivating the Sept. 11 attackers, a tiny minority of disaffected, violent extremists whose twisted views are a perversion of Islam. They no more represent the vast majority of Muslims worldwide than the Ku Klux Klan represents the worlds Christians.
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NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Personnel and guests at Fort Meade gathered Thursday, on the anniversary of the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil, to remember the nearly 3,000 lives lost that day - and pay tribute to 411 fallen first responders with the unveiling of a stained-glass image that includes a piece of the World Trade Center. "It has been 13 years since New York City, New Jersey, and the D.C.-area emergency responders became the stuff of legend as firefighters, police officers and paramedic EMTs followed the call of duty into the pages of history," Deputy Garrison Cmdr.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
The Middle River Volunteer Ambulance Rescue Co. has acquired a piece of rusted steel from the fallen World Trade Center with plans to make the artifact the focal point of its lobby. Volunteers will make a temporary public display for the 2- by 2-foot section, until a decision is reached on a permanent placement. The artifact, which members say will serve as a visible reminder of the sacrifices made on Sept. 11, 2001, came to the station on Leland Avenue after a year of negotiations with the Port Authority in New York and New Jersey.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
Vivienne Sharp is too young to carry with her vivid memories of Sept. 11, 2001, but she had a solemn reaction as she walked in the rain last week amid the long benches of the Pentagon's memorial to those who died that day. "It is a beautiful piece of architecture. It is really sensory," she said. Every one of the benches has the name of a victim carved into it, all 184. "The gravel is crunching when you walk on it and you can hear the water flowing under the benches. " Sharp is 11 years old, and like other students born after 9/11, she'll be among the first to learn about the terrorist attacks as a historic event.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
A conservation team from Maryland's archaeology lab is in Manhattan this week, working to recover the remains of a wooden sailing ship found buried at the World Trade Center site. The ship's fragile timbers are being extracted from the muck, wrapped, labeled and packed for shipment next week to the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, part of the Jefferson-Patterson Park & Museum in St. Leonard, where they will be treated so they may eventually be reassembled. The lab was built, in part, to conserve and store artifacts recovered from Maryland waters.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2010
Three giant steel beams twisted and fused together during the collapse of the North Tower of New York's World Trade Center in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The rubble, which arrived Tuesday, will be reborn as Maryland's 9/11 memorial, to be erected at Baltimore's World Trade Center in time for the 10th anniversary of the attacks. Gov. Martin O'Malley called it "a sacred and holy relic," and his voice faltered as he said he would do his part to ensure that the state never forgets the 43 Marylanders who died when airplanes smashed into the towers and the Pentagon in Virginia.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
Two beams from the wreckage of the 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City have made their way to Anne Arundel County. A pair of beams from the wreckage of the 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City have made their way to Anne Arundel County. The beams will be used for a county memorial to the police and firefighters who died in the Sept. 11 attacks, which killed more than 3,000. County Executive John R. Leopold has created a committee to review applications for a design.
NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Personnel and guests at Fort Meade gathered Thursday, on the anniversary of the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil, to remember the nearly 3,000 lives lost that day - and pay tribute to 411 fallen first responders with the unveiling of a stained-glass image that includes a piece of the World Trade Center. "It has been 13 years since New York City, New Jersey, and the D.C.-area emergency responders became the stuff of legend as firefighters, police officers and paramedic EMTs followed the call of duty into the pages of history," Deputy Garrison Cmdr.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | September 30, 2001
It could have been so much worse for May Davis Group Inc. The Baltimore investment banking firm initially feared nearly all its 52 employees on the 87th floor of 1 World Trade Center had been killed. As it turned out, May Davis lost one. Now the company is trying to pull itself together in a temporary office at 120 Broadway, a short walk from the mound of rubble called ground zero. The job is daunting. Files are gone, phone systems don't work, some business has vanished and some employees are too afraid to come back to work.
NEWS
By Erika Hayasaki and Erika Hayasaki,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 12, 2007
NEW YORK -- Sitting in a chair just after 7:30 a.m., beneath the amber glow of a hallway light, Carol Ashley leans over and ties the laces of an old pair of sneakers. She slips her good shoes into her purse. She knows it will be muddy in the pit. Outside, the sky is gray and rain slaps her windows. Six years ago on a Tuesday morning nothing like this one, Ashley's 25-year-old daughter, Janice, stood in this hallway wearing a taupe dress suit, a silver watch and her great-grandmother's pearl earrings.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 10, 2013
In Hillary Clinton's farewell remarks in February on stepping down as President Barack Obama's secretary of state, she echoed one of her predecessors, Madeleine Albright, declaring America to be "the indispensable nation. " "We are the force for progress, prosperity and peace," Mrs. Clinton elaborated. "And because we have to get it right for ourselves. " Ms. Albright had put it this way: "If we have to use force, it is because we are America. We are the indispensable nation.
EXPLORE
By Cherlyn Venit dpws@aol.com 301-725-7711 | September 14, 2011
Last Sunday, we all focused on a day of remembrance. Many of us were lucky to have our loved ones return home on that fateful Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2001. Others were not so lucky. Each of us will forever remember where we were and what we were doing when we heard about the planes striking the World Trade Center's towers, in New York, and then hitting much closer to home as one struck the Pentagon. Our family in particular received a wake-up call that day. Both my husband, John; and my brother, Eric; worked in the Pentagon.
EXPLORE
BY MARISSA GALLO, mgallo@theaegis.com | September 11, 2011
Ten years later and we still can't forget. More than 350 firemen and women, police officer, friends, relatives and nearby residents gathered inside the still-rather-new Darlington Volunteer Fire Company station, 1520 Whiteford Road, on the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks to commemorate a special memorial outside the station dedicated to those who died and those who survived that day, as well as the people in the community who...
NEWS
September 11, 2011
Today marks the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks and serves as a point to measure the indelible impact that day has had on the American people. In recent weeks, much has been written and broadcast about the shock and horror of that day and its lasting influence on public policy and even the national psyche. Such a commemoration is only natural, given the gravity of that day. Perhaps, for some, there is a catharsis to be found in reliving those fateful hours when so many watched in disbelief as two passenger jets struck the World Trade Center buildings in New York, a third hit the Pentagon, and a fourth crashed in a rural Pennsylvania farm field.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
Beautiful September days are difficult for Basmattie Bishundat. Her son was killed on one 10 years ago. "Sometimes I hate those days," said the Waldorf woman, whose son, Romeo, was three days short of his 24th birthday when Flight 77 struck the Pentagon, where he worked. As she and other Marylanders gathered Sunday in Baltimore to dedicate the state's memorial to the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the weather abruptly shifted from sunshine to a rain that struck some there as absolutely fitting.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
Maybe it was the graphic-novel clarity of the images, the perfect geometry of the World Trade Center towers against the flat blue sky, the orange fireballs that blossomed from the puncture wounds. Or perhaps it was the cascading of horrors, a plane striking the seemingly impenetrable Pentagon, another one falling out of the sky into a Pennsylvania field. Even as it unfolded in real time, 9/11 felt mythic. It had the feeling of an era-divider, a Berlin Wall, a where-were-you moment, separating everything pre- from everything post-.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,Sun Staff | March 10, 2002
They canceled an entire week of professional football over it. People stocked their basements with crates of bottled water. Gun sales soared. Paul McCartney got so upset, he purged his soul in song -- caterwauling "Freeeeeeedom!" at any venue that would have him. Now, Americans seem to be over it. The slaughter of Sept. 11 is just six months behind us, but the tabloids are now breathless over Rosie O'Donnell coming out of the closet. Is it a mark of national resilience? Or a sign of callousness?
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
Even in last week's steamy heat, I got the same chill I always get at Ground Zero. The immensity of the physical and emotional hole left by the 9/11 terrorist attack is hard to imagine from afar — you have to actually be there, looking down into the abyss. But the other thing that's hard to imagine from afar is how the sanctity of the site has nothing to do with anything around it. Even two blocks away. That is where the so-called Ground Zero mosque is supposed to be built. So-called because it can no more be considered the "Ground Zero mosque" than, say, the existing New York Dolls Gentlemen's Club one more block away could be considered the "Ground Zero Gentlemen's Club.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | September 9, 2011
Michael Chrvala's current students were 3 years old on Sept. 11, 2001. They didn't see the hijacked airliners crash into the twin towers of the World Trade Center, or the plane plow into Pentagon, and they didn't hear news reports about the jet that crashed in a field in Shanksville, Pa. Nevertheless Chrvala, a Towson resident who has taught social studies in the Carroll County Public Schools for 18 years, takes every opportunity to teach...
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