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By Page Huidekoper Wilson | September 28, 1990
UNLESS immediate action is taken, by the year 2000 one-third of the world's children between 5 and 16 will be living on the street.Street children and the host of other problems facing children, including those in the United States, have prompted UNICEF, the United Nations children's fund, to organize a "World Summit for Children" this weekend in New York. President Bush is among 70 heads of state (probably the largest gathering of heads of state in history) committed to attend the first-ever PageHuidekoperWilsonworld conference on children.
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NEWS
June 27, 2010
Americans are generous people. To see our generosity, one need only look at the outpouring of aid in response to natural disasters. From the earthquake in Haiti to flooding in Tennessee to the Gulf Coast oil spill, when Americans see people in need, they don't hesitate to help. Working in global health, we often witness human tragedy on an overwhelming scale. Yet because the burden of infectious disease is constant rather than the result of one terrible event, the scope of the problem evades the front-page headlines and the public consciousness.
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NEWS
By Kurt Schmoke & Alfred Sommer | September 11, 1990
MORE THAN 70 heads of state -- presidents, prime ministers and kings -- will meet at the United Nations the end of this month to end a war. The battlefields will see no blood because the final struggles will be fought in classrooms, clinics and homes of the world.The World Summit for Children will set forth a crusade to take our children into the 21st century with a mandate to be healthy, educated and productive.Who will be the leaders? Every mayor of every town on Earth. Every public health professional in the field.
NEWS
By Rachel Patron | December 31, 2007
Lord, I have only one wish: May 2008 be a better year for the world's children. The year we are about to leave has been another brutal one for the small and defenseless in our midst. The suffering of children has been lamented throughout history, causing biblical prophets to issue warnings that God would rain fire and brimstone on whoever harms widows and orphans. Charles Dickens' portrayals of starving, dirty-faced urchins toiling for pennies in London slums prompted governments to enact laws against child labor.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | October 5, 1993
THE news reports concentrated on the costs of policing the globe, on the United States' place in the New World Order and on the United Nations' role in hot spots from Bosnia to Somalia.All of those, of course, are legitimate issues of grave magnitude, and I expected President Clinton would wax eloquent on them in his address to the United Nations last week.Yet none of the half-dozen news reports I saw mentioned what Mr. Clinton said about the most critical issue facing the leaders of the world today -- the unconscionable deaths of children from preventable diseases and hunger, at home and abroad.
NEWS
December 25, 1993
PPE: It may sound like a utility company, but it's shorthand for poverty, population growth and environmental stress -- the formula for a downward spiral toward greater human misery for millions of people around the world. James Grant, director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), cites the "PPE spiral" in the fund's annual "State of the World's Children" report,released this week.In many ways, improving the lives of the world's children is too easy, simply because needs are so great that almost any positive effort can make a measurable difference.
NEWS
December 22, 1991
The "peace dividend" made possible by the end of the Cold War could assure all the world's children adequate nourishment, basic health care and a primary education by the end of this decade. That is the premise of the optimistic "agenda for a new world order" put forth last week by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) in its annual "State of the World's Children" report.One billion people live in near-absolute poverty. "For almost half a century," UNICEF says, "war and ideological division have distracted attention and diverted resources.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | January 4, 1993
London. -- No famine, no war, no flood, no earthquake has ever claimed the lives of 250,000 children in a single week. Yet malnutrition and disease claim that number of the world's children every seven days. That is the first consideration.The second, as UNICEF's newly published ''State of the World's Children'' makes plain, is that for a mere $25 billion it would now be possible ''to control the major childhood diseases, eradicate polio, halve child malnutrition, bring clean water to all communities, provide a basic education for every child, and make family planning available to all couples.
NEWS
January 1, 2005
MORE THAN half the world's children face a future of certain deprivation. Orphaned by poverty, AIDS or war. Abducted into the armies of warlords. Sold into the sex trade. Exploited by labor crews. Maimed by landmines. As described in UNICEF's The State of the World's Children 2005, children are suffering mightily and governments are to blame for much of their despair. The examples are numerous. As militias displace families and children in western Darfur, Sudanese officials have yet to disarm them.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | December 20, 1991
London. - "We have already traveled three-quarters of the way toward a world in which every man, woman and child has adequate food, safe water, basic health care and primary education. There is no financial or technological barrier to prevent the completion of this journey in our times,'' announces James Grant, executive director of the United Nations Children's Fund, in its annual report ''The State of the World's Children.''Why aren't we completing the other 25 per cent of this remarkable journey that has transformed the well-being of most of the world in this century?
NEWS
By Joshua T. Lozman and Lainie Rutkow | April 17, 2007
President Bush's recently proposed budget included a $123 million assistance package to fund UNICEF's health, education and protection programs throughout the world this coming fiscal year. We applaud the president for this decision and hope Congress will follow his lead. Allocating funds to secure the health and safety of children is an important step toward the creation of a healthier, safer world. Yet, while multimillion-dollar budget allocations are generous and crucial to UNICEF's efforts, the United States could take an additional simple, crucial step toward improving the state of the world's children.
NEWS
January 1, 2005
MORE THAN half the world's children face a future of certain deprivation. Orphaned by poverty, AIDS or war. Abducted into the armies of warlords. Sold into the sex trade. Exploited by labor crews. Maimed by landmines. As described in UNICEF's The State of the World's Children 2005, children are suffering mightily and governments are to blame for much of their despair. The examples are numerous. As militias displace families and children in western Darfur, Sudanese officials have yet to disarm them.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2004
Peter Ustinov, who died Sunday at his home in Switzerland at age 82, resembled a cross between an English bulldog and a teddy bear - imposing, but adorable; refined, but mischievious. In the annals of great British actors, he'll go down as Shakespearean, with a touch of Monty Python. "Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious," Ustinov was reported to have once said, offering a wry and typically dexterous summation of his life and career. The actor, whose movie career spanned more than 60 years, from 1942's One of Our Aircraft Is Missing to 2003's Luther, died of heart failure at a Swiss clinic near his home in Bursins.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 14, 1995
When Jane Virden goes to her job as head nurse at Johns Hopkins Hospital's pediatric emergency room, she faces kids with broken bones, infants who have overdosed on narcotics left lying around by their parents, teen-age girls who arrive ready to deliver babies, unconscious children, illnesses and accident victims and a sense of her own utter exhaustion by the end of each day.At which point, she goes home to relax.With her husband Michael.And their twin 5-year-old girls, Alexandra and Jordan.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Despite the death toll exacted by civil war, poverty and drought, developing nations have generally improved the health of their children through increased immunization, improved primary care and simple techniques like adding iodine to salt.The annual "State of the World's Children" report, released yesterday by UNICEF, said that by next year, 2.5 million fewer children would be dying annually from malnutrition and preventable diseases than died in 1990. Also, 750,000 fewer youngsters will be disabled, blinded, crippled or mentally retarded.
NEWS
December 25, 1993
PPE: It may sound like a utility company, but it's shorthand for poverty, population growth and environmental stress -- the formula for a downward spiral toward greater human misery for millions of people around the world. James Grant, director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), cites the "PPE spiral" in the fund's annual "State of the World's Children" report,released this week.In many ways, improving the lives of the world's children is too easy, simply because needs are so great that almost any positive effort can make a measurable difference.
NEWS
By Rachel Patron | December 31, 2007
Lord, I have only one wish: May 2008 be a better year for the world's children. The year we are about to leave has been another brutal one for the small and defenseless in our midst. The suffering of children has been lamented throughout history, causing biblical prophets to issue warnings that God would rain fire and brimstone on whoever harms widows and orphans. Charles Dickens' portrayals of starving, dirty-faced urchins toiling for pennies in London slums prompted governments to enact laws against child labor.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 17, 1992
Pneumonia is now the biggest killer of children in the modern world, resulting in 3.6 million deaths annually, but in most cases the cure is a five-day course of antibiotics that costs only 25 cents, according to a U.N. report released yesterday.The means of stopping pneumonia and dozens of other childhood diseases are now "available and affordable," the report said, but countries are not making the necessary investments in basic medical care, sanitation and education."The present neglect," the report said, "is a scandal of which the public is largely unaware."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 21, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- Striking an upbeat note about its struggle to reduce infant mortality, UNICEF says "a final offensive" may now be under way against the biggest killers of small children in the world.Its annual report, "The State of the World's Children," notes that infant deaths from pneumonia, diarrhea, measles, tetanus and whooping cough are all in retreat and that severe malnutrition is being reduced despite a 20 percent rise in the number of children under 5 in the last decade."Through the lens of history rather than of news, what is now happening in the developing world may come to be seen as the beginning of a final offensive against some of the oldest and most common enemies of the world's children," UNICEF says.
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