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NEWS
By Steven W. Sinding & Sheldon J. Segal | December 26, 1991
A CONTRACEPTIVE revolution -- a remarkable success story -- has gone largely unnoticed in the West. It is as impressive as agriculture's green revolution, and perhaps equally important in averting widespread famine in many developing countries.Third-World women are averaging 3.9 children, and more than 50 percent of the women use some form of contraception, according to estimates of the United Nations. This is a stunning change from the 8 percent who used contraception in 1965 when they were averaging more than six children.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 30, 2012
China should be at the center of the 2012 Republican campaign for the White House. Unless Mitt Romney emphasizes specific solutions for creating jobs by ending unnecessary outsourcing to the Middle Kingdom, he won't win. President Barack Obama's economy is a disaster - since the recovery began in June 2009, economic growth has averaged a paltry 2.4 percent, and unemployment hangs stubbornly above 8 percent. Ronald Reagan, like President Obama, inherited a deeply troubled economy.
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NEWS
By Bryant Robey | July 17, 1992
WORLD Population Day was last Sunday. It dawned on about 5.5 billion people -- nearly 100 million more than on July 11, 1991. By the year 2000 the world's population will have passed the 6 billion mark. Will population ever stop growing? If so, when, and at what number?Most people recognize that, because the Earth is finite, it cannot support endless population growth. The world's population must stop growing someday. But, paradoxically, even though the average family is smaller than in the past -- and in some developed countries has fallen below the two-children-per-family "replacement level" -- the world's population continues to grow ever larger.
NEWS
July 16, 2012
Regarding a recent Sun op-ed page, it's rare to see two commentaries side by side that perfectly cancel each other out. In one, John Seager notes that the Earth's population is growing at a rate of 80 million people a year ("An Unhappy World Population Day," July 11). In the other, Thomas F. Schaller exhorts us to welcome immigrants even when their "economic pressure forces those of us already here to work harder" ("Hostility toward recent immigrants a long U.S. tradition," July 11). It might occur to Mr. Schaller that today jobs are a precious commodity, and it's only natural to want them protected.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | August 14, 1992
It's tempting to question the fitnessOf Reagan's next role as a witness;He signed on enough$ Of Iran-contra stuffBut promptly forgot the whole bitness.Heston came from DeMille's movie lotsTo make matching video spots:One seeks limitation$ Of world population,One assures it with NRA shots.If our weaponry wasn't as smartAs censors first sought to impart,By eluding each bomb& Laser-aimed at Saddam,His survival was state of the art.This year, as we vote without verve,We wonder who threw us a curve;But while we berate( This and that candidate,They may be the ones we deserve.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | August 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Women in many poor, developing countries are having fewer children than their mothers did, an international survey showed recently.This drop in fertility rates is a welcome trend on a planet whose population will double during the next century, said experts attending the Demographic and Health Surveys World Conference.But it will not prevent changes in the lifestyles of virtually everyone on earth as the world's population goes from an expected 6 billion in 1998 to 12 billion near the end of the next century, said Martin Vsessen of the Institute for Resource Development.
NEWS
July 25, 1993
Every three years, enough people are added to the Earth to equal the population of the United States. But the vast majority -- 95 percent -- are being born in the countries least able to provide food, shelter, education and the means to earn a living. Concern about world population is not just a numbers game. The patterns of human growth produce trends that will shape living conditions all around the world. The pressures forcing desperate people to try any means, legal or illegal, to reach countries like the United States or Germany stem in large part from the turmoil produced when too many people compete for too few resources.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
Throughout time, each society determines its own mores and customs. With our world population approaching seven billion people, adopting same-sex marriage in Maryland might be a good idea. From an evolutionary standpoint and over a relatively short period of time, we would no longer have to concern ourselves with overcrowding or feeding our population. At the conclusion of this time and thanks to same-sex marriage, we would no longer exist. Over five thousand years, various societies throughout the world have determined that a man and a woman are best suited, sanctioned by and through the institution of marriage, to carry on the ultimate function of civilization, which is, procreation of the human species.
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | April 4, 1993
Next time you're sitting in traffic or lamenting the loss of another stretch of farmland to development, try to imagine what your favorite countryside will look like a few decades from now.According to Census Department projections, United States population will grow from 255 million people in 1992 to 383 million by the middle of the next century. That's 128 million more people who will need transportation and shelter, among other things. So if you think zoning fights or NIMBY disputes are tough now, just wait.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,Timothy Wheeler covers environment for The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 1992
When Christopher F. D'Elia was growing up 40-some years ago in the Washington, D.C., area, the nation's capital was like "a small Southern town," he recalls.Where he lived, in Arlington, Va., was at the limits of urban development. "It was country beyond there," he says. The world itself seemed much smaller then, too.How things have changed.Washington is now a sprawling megalopolis, with suburban tentacles reaching deep into the former farmland and forests of Maryland and Virginia. The number of people living in the region, which drains into the Chesapeake Bay, has grown more than 50 percent in the past four decades.
NEWS
By John Seager | July 10, 2012
Wednesday is World Population Day! Why does that matter? Unlike Slurpee Day - also Wednesday - or National Hot Dog Day (July 21), population growth has a direct effect on you, your children, your future and the health of our planet. Let's put population growth into terms any Orioles fan can understand. Every hour, the world population increases by about 9,100 people. At that rate, it would only take about five hours to fill up Camden Yards. It would be loud. It would be crowded. A lot of Slurpees and hot dogs would be needed to feed everyone.
NEWS
By Rennie A. Silva | April 9, 2012
  2012 marks the 40th anniversary of President Richard Nixon's historic visit to China, a diplomatic triumph that realigned American foreign policy. Since Nixon's trip, U.S.-China relations have been managed from the uppermost echelons of the executive branch of the federal government. Yet they have also been sustained and strengthened at the state and local level, as evidenced by Maryland's China diplomacy. Forty years ago this month, Maryland began its engagement with China by becoming the site of an iconic exchange in sports diplomacy, a groundbreaking ping-pong match between China and the U.S. The event was held at theUniversity of Maryland, College Parkon April 17, 1972, less than two months after President Nixon's return from China.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
Throughout time, each society determines its own mores and customs. With our world population approaching seven billion people, adopting same-sex marriage in Maryland might be a good idea. From an evolutionary standpoint and over a relatively short period of time, we would no longer have to concern ourselves with overcrowding or feeding our population. At the conclusion of this time and thanks to same-sex marriage, we would no longer exist. Over five thousand years, various societies throughout the world have determined that a man and a woman are best suited, sanctioned by and through the institution of marriage, to carry on the ultimate function of civilization, which is, procreation of the human species.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Ron Smith is surely right when he writes, "There are now too many people to manage. " ("Population, debt problems so big, they defy solutions," July 15). But his assertion that global population is projected to increase by 50 percent by mid-century is a worst-case scenario, according to United Nations population projections. The UN offers three projections: low, medium, and high. The 50 percent increase mentioned by Mr. Smith, which would amount to a world population of 10.5 billion by 2050 (compared with our present 7 billion)
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2004
The plentiful supply of meat and year-round produce that enhances our tables these days comes with a price tag: More widely traveled foods are spreading deadly infections. Green onions from Mexico killed three patrons of a Pennsylvania restaurant and sickened more than 600 in the fall. Mad cow test standards were tightened last week, months after a Washington state Holstein was infected with the disease, traced to a Canadian herd. A strain of avian flu discovered this month in Maryland - while no threat to humans - endangers the state's multimillion-dollar poultry industry.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2002
IT IS SUMMERTIME and the skies are angry, filled with smoke from forest fires, the greenhouse gases building up almost before your eyes, the fragile ozone layer barely protecting humanity from the sun's destructive rays. Soon, perhaps, a melting ice cap will put your favorite beach resort under water. Then, you will turn on your tap and no water will come out. The reservoirs will be dry. Since the environmental movement first gained strength 30 years ago, predictions of the demise of the world as we know it have been a staple.
NEWS
July 16, 2012
Regarding a recent Sun op-ed page, it's rare to see two commentaries side by side that perfectly cancel each other out. In one, John Seager notes that the Earth's population is growing at a rate of 80 million people a year ("An Unhappy World Population Day," July 11). In the other, Thomas F. Schaller exhorts us to welcome immigrants even when their "economic pressure forces those of us already here to work harder" ("Hostility toward recent immigrants a long U.S. tradition," July 11). It might occur to Mr. Schaller that today jobs are a precious commodity, and it's only natural to want them protected.
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Ron Smith is surely right when he writes, "There are now too many people to manage. " ("Population, debt problems so big, they defy solutions," July 15). But his assertion that global population is projected to increase by 50 percent by mid-century is a worst-case scenario, according to United Nations population projections. The UN offers three projections: low, medium, and high. The 50 percent increase mentioned by Mr. Smith, which would amount to a world population of 10.5 billion by 2050 (compared with our present 7 billion)
NEWS
September 10, 2001
FINALLY, China expects the World Trade Organization meeting in Geneva this week to decide on its admission to the global economy. Some tariff reductions and increases in trade have already begun, in anticipation of that happening in early 2002. This movement coincides with diplomatic activity. China's foreign minister is coming to Washington this month to help prepare a state visit there by President Bush in October. China does not agree to U.S. national missile defense, and the Bush administration has not accepted Chinese missile modernization, but each is willing to discuss the other's ideas.
NEWS
August 11, 2001
Pig racing isn't the real story of Carroll County fair The Sun sent a reporter to the Carroll County 4-H/pH Fair and came back with a front-page article on racing pigs ("Fair has squeal appeal," Aug. 1). Although this bit of entertainment is indeed enjoyable, it is far from the true joy of the fair. Stories The Sun might have found include: The time and effort put into projects by the children and their parents, proudly displayed with a willingness to be seen and judged by the community.
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