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By RICHARD O'MARA | November 7, 1993
Everywhere you look, the ins are being thrown out; the outs are coming in.In the Canadian elections of Oct. 25, the ruling Progressive Conservatives were virtually wiped out as a significant political force by the more leftist Liberal Party; their parliamentary representation was reduced from 155 seats to two.Two weeks earlier, in Greece, the Conservative government of Constantine Mitsotakis was singed by the fading fire of Andreas Papandreou as it lost...
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
With about a month to go before Election Day, I know it won't be long before the commercials get even more ominous. Any day now, I'm sure I'll see one that starts, in that scary-movie-trailer voice, "In a world in which …" I can even provide the rest of the ad copy: For the vote-yes-on-Question-7 set: "In a world in which gambling isn't expanded in Maryland, unemployment will rise to new heights and those out of work will sink to new lows....
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NEWS
By Daniel Berger | September 14, 1996
HAVE PITY ON countries that must deal with this one in an election year. They put up with U.S. policy-making that sees foreign policy only as domestic voting issues, for one whole year in every four.President Clinton's domestic policy gestures are widely seen as savvy if cynical election ploys, to be corrected after election if necessary. His signature on the welfare-reform bill is typical.But his foreign policy is equally prioritized by the departed Dick Morris. It isn't what's right, but what will take away the opportunity for Republicans to attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
"VEEP" is the kind of series that separates HBO from almost every other channel or network making television these days. It takes great risks, dares to break new ground, includes some of the most imaginative artists working in the arts and aims for nothing less than absolute cultural relevance. Oh, yeah: It is also very, very funny in its snarky, off-beat, highly profane, single-camera way. That sensibility might take a little getting used to for some viewers. But give it a chance, and you will come to love the way it's used here to illuminate the darkness at the heart of our partisan-crazed, gridlocked and bleak national political life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 15, 2011
Please allow me (or "myself" as Mike Myers famously said ) to introduce myself. Those of you who have been reading Baltimore-area newspapers for the past decade might (or might not) recognize my byline (I've written articles for The Sun, The Examiner, the Howard County Times, etc.) but this is my first attempt at a regular blog. We're calling it the Ridiculous Report and, on it, I plan to show on a frequent basis how common sense is often lost in our discussions of politics, government and the news in general.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 24, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- These were the Winter Olympics of politics and pressure. You could barely take a step without bumping into an athlete whose story was somehow intertwined with a country rising, falling or merging. And everywhere, as much a constant as snow in the mountains, there was pressure.The Olympics are always about pressure, of course. These athletes practice four years for defining moments that often last less than a minute. It's twisted logic impossible to reconcile, and it can shatter when joined by the burden of expectation.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
With about a month to go before Election Day, I know it won't be long before the commercials get even more ominous. Any day now, I'm sure I'll see one that starts, in that scary-movie-trailer voice, "In a world in which …" I can even provide the rest of the ad copy: For the vote-yes-on-Question-7 set: "In a world in which gambling isn't expanded in Maryland, unemployment will rise to new heights and those out of work will sink to new lows....
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
1992 Summer Olympics A to ZAlbania. Kept home for 20 years by a communist regime bent on repression, Albania returns to the Summer Games with an eight-athlete team that includes Frank Leskaj, 23, a swimmer from Miami who holds dual citizenship.Bubka. Born in Ukraine, a resident of Berlin, once a cog in the old Soviet sports machine, Sergei Bubka calls himself a "citizen of the world." While other athletes are grounded, Bubka flies, setting world records in the pole vault nearly every time he competes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
"VEEP" is the kind of series that separates HBO from almost every other channel or network making television these days. It takes great risks, dares to break new ground, includes some of the most imaginative artists working in the arts and aims for nothing less than absolute cultural relevance. Oh, yeah: It is also very, very funny in its snarky, off-beat, highly profane, single-camera way. That sensibility might take a little getting used to for some viewers. But give it a chance, and you will come to love the way it's used here to illuminate the darkness at the heart of our partisan-crazed, gridlocked and bleak national political life.
FEATURES
By Tim Blangger and Tim Blangger,The Allentown Morning Call | January 30, 1992
THINGS change, geographically speaking.Countries change their own names, or have their names adjusted, usually but not always by force. Countries appropriate sections of other countries, or witness parts of their own country being appropriated by others. Forces quieter and far more subtle than invading armies can alter a border or make a carefully detailed map obsolete over time. Rivers move boundaries. Sand shifts with the wind.But few periods in world history have seen as many changes, geographically speaking, as in the past two years, geographers say. In that time, East and West Germany have became one country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 15, 2011
Please allow me (or "myself" as Mike Myers famously said ) to introduce myself. Those of you who have been reading Baltimore-area newspapers for the past decade might (or might not) recognize my byline (I've written articles for The Sun, The Examiner, the Howard County Times, etc.) but this is my first attempt at a regular blog. We're calling it the Ridiculous Report and, on it, I plan to show on a frequent basis how common sense is often lost in our discussions of politics, government and the news in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Gary Dorsey | October 7, 2001
Of the past, they could still recall how their football team crushed Parkville 48-12 in the season opener and how a brilliant blue sky prevailed all morning and how Britney Spears writhed with a python on the MTV Video Music Awards. Of the immediate future, they could still have faith. At Catonsville High School, auditions for the fall play, Up The Down Staircase, would soon begin. At Montgomery Blair High School, students would again record the most National Merit Scholarship semi-finalists in the state - for the sixth year in a row. But that Tuesday morning, the anchored past and constant future severed.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2000
It wasn't just MSNBC talk-show host Chris Matthews who was playing "Hardball." When the presidential election went into the postseason - or extra innings or overtime - pundits and politicians commenting on the race for the White House took their use of sports metaphors to a new level. Really stepped it up. Indeed, the marathon that Al Gore and George W. Bush began running so many years ago had turned into a sprint with the candidates pushing well past the usual finish line 26.2 miles away.
NEWS
By Daniel Berger | September 14, 1996
HAVE PITY ON countries that must deal with this one in an election year. They put up with U.S. policy-making that sees foreign policy only as domestic voting issues, for one whole year in every four.President Clinton's domestic policy gestures are widely seen as savvy if cynical election ploys, to be corrected after election if necessary. His signature on the welfare-reform bill is typical.But his foreign policy is equally prioritized by the departed Dick Morris. It isn't what's right, but what will take away the opportunity for Republicans to attack.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
He is, according to one of his biographers, the Energizer Bunny of world politics.Fidel Castro, 69, still bearded and seemingly in robust health, moves right along, beating his drum for world socialism and the Cuban Revolution, and against the United States' economic embargo of his country.These are the themes that he will probably speak upon, and probably at great length, in New York during the festivities next ,, week marking the 50th anniversary of the United Nations.Mr. Castro has been Cuba's leader for almost 37 years and the enduring nemesis of the world's remaining superpower.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | November 7, 1993
Everywhere you look, the ins are being thrown out; the outs are coming in.In the Canadian elections of Oct. 25, the ruling Progressive Conservatives were virtually wiped out as a significant political force by the more leftist Liberal Party; their parliamentary representation was reduced from 155 seats to two.Two weeks earlier, in Greece, the Conservative government of Constantine Mitsotakis was singed by the fading fire of Andreas Papandreou as it lost...
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
He is, according to one of his biographers, the Energizer Bunny of world politics.Fidel Castro, 69, still bearded and seemingly in robust health, moves right along, beating his drum for world socialism and the Cuban Revolution, and against the United States' economic embargo of his country.These are the themes that he will probably speak upon, and probably at great length, in New York during the festivities next ,, week marking the 50th anniversary of the United Nations.Mr. Castro has been Cuba's leader for almost 37 years and the enduring nemesis of the world's remaining superpower.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Gary Dorsey | October 7, 2001
Of the past, they could still recall how their football team crushed Parkville 48-12 in the season opener and how a brilliant blue sky prevailed all morning and how Britney Spears writhed with a python on the MTV Video Music Awards. Of the immediate future, they could still have faith. At Catonsville High School, auditions for the fall play, Up The Down Staircase, would soon begin. At Montgomery Blair High School, students would again record the most National Merit Scholarship semi-finalists in the state - for the sixth year in a row. But that Tuesday morning, the anchored past and constant future severed.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
1992 Summer Olympics A to ZAlbania. Kept home for 20 years by a communist regime bent on repression, Albania returns to the Summer Games with an eight-athlete team that includes Frank Leskaj, 23, a swimmer from Miami who holds dual citizenship.Bubka. Born in Ukraine, a resident of Berlin, once a cog in the old Soviet sports machine, Sergei Bubka calls himself a "citizen of the world." While other athletes are grounded, Bubka flies, setting world records in the pole vault nearly every time he competes.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | February 24, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- These were the Winter Olympics of politics and pressure. You could barely take a step without bumping into an athlete whose story was somehow intertwined with a country rising, falling or merging. And everywhere, as much a constant as snow in the mountains, there was pressure.The Olympics are always about pressure, of course. These athletes practice four years for defining moments that often last less than a minute. It's twisted logic impossible to reconcile, and it can shatter when joined by the burden of expectation.
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