Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWorld Music
IN THE NEWS

World Music

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 21, 1998
Walk into a Tower Records anywhere in the world, and you'll find promotional displays that look essentially the same as the ones at home. Nor is there much difference in the CD bins, where you'll find international superstars like Celine Dion, U2 or Janet Jackson.Some things, though, are quite different. Take the world-music section. Here in America, we think of world music as being foreign and exotic, performed in incomprehensible languages by singers with unpronounceable names. It's Oum Kalthoum and Marta Sebestyen, Fela Anikulapo Kuti and the late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Tim Gregory is fond of telling schoolchildren that his music career began while playing his mother's pots and pans with pencils as a kid. It's a testament to his credo that "everything is a potential instrument. " Gregory not only encourages playing with sticks and spoons, he shows how people from foreign lands have made them art forms. He teaches welcoming songs and games from abroad, particularly East Africa. And he encourages children to see similarities between conventional musical instruments and the didgeridoo from Australia, the thumb piano from Tanzania, the kemenche — a Turkish bow instrument that he's learning to play — and others.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Tim Gregory is fond of telling schoolchildren that his music career began while playing his mother's pots and pans with pencils as a kid. It's a testament to his credo that "everything is a potential instrument. " Gregory not only encourages playing with sticks and spoons, he shows how people from foreign lands have made them art forms. He teaches welcoming songs and games from abroad, particularly East Africa. And he encourages children to see similarities between conventional musical instruments and the didgeridoo from Australia, the thumb piano from Tanzania, the kemenche — a Turkish bow instrument that he's learning to play — and others.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2010
Nelson William Knode, a trumpeter who led a swing orchestra and was known as the music man of Catonsville, died of respiratory failure Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 88 and lived in Relay. Born in Baltimore and raised on Fulton Avenue, he credited his parents with getting him into a life of music. "I'll tell you what kind of people they were," he said in a 1982 Sun article. "My dad was laid off by the B&O Railroad when I was 8 or 9 years old. It was right around Christmastime, and we didn't have two pennies to rub together.
NEWS
February 14, 1996
A visit to any large record store suggests "world music" and "world beat" discs and cassettes are big sellers. So long, American isolationism.At a time when U.S. pop music has conquered the world as never before, Americans in unprecedented numbers have discovered foreign pop and folk music. This is different from the weekend polka or bouzouki jamborees on ethnic radio stations. "World music" listeners typically have no ethnic connection to the music they want to hear."World music" is authentic ethnic music from foreign countries; "world beat" is crossover music like Brazilian bossa nova or certain types of rhythmic and harmonic creations based on West African highlife music.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | November 25, 2007
Students crowd around music teacher Nellie Hill and hold out their hands, telling her that their fingers still are vibrating after spending 45 minutes pounding on drums. That's one of the sensations students experience as part of Lime Kiln Middle School's World Music Drumming group. "I feel more like I'm playing when I'm using my hands, not sticks," said eighth-grader Paul Del Riego, who is participating in the group for the first time. "I feel like I'm more in the music. The sound that it makes is just really cool."
NEWS
September 12, 2004
John Edward Gorozdos, a local musician and sales representative for a classical and world music distributor, drowned Monday at his Phoenix home. He was 40. Born in Washington and raised in Silver Spring and Burtonsville, he was a 1981 graduate of Paint Branch High School. He received an aerospace engineering degree from the University of Maryland in 1986. Although Mr. Gorozdos' academic background was in the sciences, his career followed an artistic path. About 20 years ago, he began working at the House of Musical Traditions, a Takoma Park music store and soon started performing.
NEWS
November 30, 2000
Western Maryland College's "Taste of Islam" will feature a traditional Ramadan dinner and a concert of Arabic music today. The program, sponsored by the Multicultural Student Association, begins at 6 p.m. with dinner in Englar Dining Hall, and concludes with a 7:30 p.m. concert featuring Palestinian star Simon Shaheen in McDaniel Lounge. Dinner tickets are $15 and concert admission is $10. A combination ticket is $20. Although the program is open to the public, seating for dinner is available on a first-come, first-served basis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
Surely they're not bored yet. Summer's just begun. They're free of school. They should be rejoicing, filling their time with summertime reading and visits to the pool, playing outside and noodling on the computer. Yep, they've done all that, you say. And still the kids are bored. You can keep them occupied, at least for a little while, Thursdays through Aug. 12 at the Carroll Arts Center in Westminster at the second annual Summer Concert Series for Kids, which features pantomime, dancing, world music, physical comedy, drumming and juggling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2005
When the teenage members of the Village Harmony World Music Youth Choir open their mouths, what comes out is rarely typical: bright, rich melodies from South Africa; dark, dissonant sounds from Georgia; catchy, offbeat Balkan rhythms. The 23 members of the Marshfield, Vt.-based group aim to create music from around the world that sounds as if it were being performed in its native country. By immersing themselves in the language and culture of each region, they attempt to capture musical nuances from inflection to beat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | December 13, 2007
When Ken Kolodner first entered the realm of traditional world music, he had no aspirations to play in public. His only goal, he said, was to one day play with other people. Now, about 30 years later, Kolodner, 53, a Baltimore resident since birth, is viewed as one of the most influential players of the hammered dulcimer, a string instrument, in the country. Also a dulcimer teacher, fiddler and hammered mbira player, the self-taught musician has released several recordings and books and performed for nearly two decades as one-third of the Baltimore-based world folk-music trio Helicon.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | November 25, 2007
Students crowd around music teacher Nellie Hill and hold out their hands, telling her that their fingers still are vibrating after spending 45 minutes pounding on drums. That's one of the sensations students experience as part of Lime Kiln Middle School's World Music Drumming group. "I feel more like I'm playing when I'm using my hands, not sticks," said eighth-grader Paul Del Riego, who is participating in the group for the first time. "I feel like I'm more in the music. The sound that it makes is just really cool."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
Mickey Hart considers himself to be in the transportation business. The purpose of his music was not to entertain during his 25 years or so as the Grateful Dead's drummer, nor is it now, he says. Instead, the percussionist said his album, Global Drum Project, is meant to transcend consciousness and transport people to positive planes of existence. "It's about moving into another state of mind," Hart said. "You think differently. It's the neurology of rhythm, and we're master `trancers.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 31, 2006
Jeffrey Sharkey, the No. 2 administrator at the Cleveland Institute of Music, has been named to the No. 1 post at the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University. The Delaware-born Sharkey will start work as Peabody director Oct. 1, succeeding Robert Sirota. Sirota resigned last June to become president of the Manhattan School of Music, where Sharkey earned his undergraduate degree. "Bob Sirota left the school in really good shape," Mark Katz, a Peabody faculty member who served on the search committee for a new director, said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | October 13, 2005
Like father, like daughter? Legendary sitar player Ravi Shankar will appear in Baltimore and Bethesda next week with an ensemble of Indian musicians and singers for an evening of ragas. Joining them will be 24-year-old Anoushka Shankar, who will conduct the ensemble during the first half of the performance and play the sitar with her father during the second half. "This is the first time I've toured with other musicians," the elder Shankar, 85, said. "I've done that in other parts of the world but not in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kim Hart and Kim Hart,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2005
When the teenage members of the Village Harmony World Music Youth Choir open their mouths, what comes out is rarely typical: bright, rich melodies from South Africa; dark, dissonant sounds from Georgia; catchy, offbeat Balkan rhythms. The 23 members of the Marshfield, Vt.-based group aim to create music from around the world that sounds as if it were being performed in its native country. By immersing themselves in the language and culture of each region, they attempt to capture musical nuances from inflection to beat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 14, 1995
BOHEMEDeep Forest (550 Music/Epic 67115)What's the difference between worldbeat and world music? Simple. World music is pure in its exoticism, staying true to the culture and traditions that created it. Worldbeat, on the other hand, is cosmopolitan and eclectic, drawing from world music but tailoring its source material to meet more modern needs. That may make the music seem cheap and artificial, but not always; at its best, worldbeat can sound as fresh and exciting as the music on Deep Forest's new album, "Boheme."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | December 13, 2007
When Ken Kolodner first entered the realm of traditional world music, he had no aspirations to play in public. His only goal, he said, was to one day play with other people. Now, about 30 years later, Kolodner, 53, a Baltimore resident since birth, is viewed as one of the most influential players of the hammered dulcimer, a string instrument, in the country. Also a dulcimer teacher, fiddler and hammered mbira player, the self-taught musician has released several recordings and books and performed for nearly two decades as one-third of the Baltimore-based world folk-music trio Helicon.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 21, 2004
Vastly different countries and cultures often can't play well together, but vastly different musical styles can be amazingly accommodating and welcoming. Cross-pollination of melodic, harmonic and rhythmic idioms goes on all the time, from folk music forays by Brahms and Dvorak to jazzy explorations by Copland and Bernstein, not to mention stabs at musical classicism by the likes of Billy Joel and Elvis Costello. A gradual breakdown in the once-formidable divides between Western and Eastern styles has been particularly fruitful over the years.
NEWS
September 12, 2004
John Edward Gorozdos, a local musician and sales representative for a classical and world music distributor, drowned Monday at his Phoenix home. He was 40. Born in Washington and raised in Silver Spring and Burtonsville, he was a 1981 graduate of Paint Branch High School. He received an aerospace engineering degree from the University of Maryland in 1986. Although Mr. Gorozdos' academic background was in the sciences, his career followed an artistic path. About 20 years ago, he began working at the House of Musical Traditions, a Takoma Park music store and soon started performing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.