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Editorial from The Record | May 9, 2013
Havre de Grace was able to pull together a respectable version of its Lafayette Trail, just in time for the bicentennial celebration of a British sacking of the city during the War of 1812. The trail is named for Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Motie, a French military advisor sent by the French crown, who became a hero of the American Revolution, then returned to his native land and became a hero of the French Revolution. Possibly because his name is a bit a mouthful, he is better known by his title, the Marquis de Lafayette.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Baltimore, home to the first received telegraph message (Samuel Morse, 1844, sent from Washington), the first umbrella factory in America (1828), the first Ouija board (1892) and - to note what really matters - the first baseball player to win MVP awards in both leagues (Frank Robinson, 1966) and the first Olympian to win eight gold medals in a single games ( Michael Phelps , 2008). As if that doesn't engender enough civic pride for any municipality, it seems Charm City, according to the Maryland Historical Society, can add another first to its list: birthplace of the American bicycle.
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By William Rice and William Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2002
Of all the ingredients used in cooking, none, I believe, is taken more for granted than salt. A recipe will instruct us to add it "to taste." No exact quantity is given, nor are we told what type of salt to use. Many cooks underplay the salt anyway, knowing that at table family and guests (sometimes even food writers) will reach for the salt before tasting the food. Dietary revisionists lobby to restrict its use, even though salt is essential to human life. It is true, also, in this era of the home cook as keen tracer of ingredients, that salts of different sizes, colors and origins are in demand.
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Editorial from The Record | May 9, 2013
Havre de Grace was able to pull together a respectable version of its Lafayette Trail, just in time for the bicentennial celebration of a British sacking of the city during the War of 1812. The trail is named for Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Motie, a French military advisor sent by the French crown, who became a hero of the American Revolution, then returned to his native land and became a hero of the French Revolution. Possibly because his name is a bit a mouthful, he is better known by his title, the Marquis de Lafayette.
NEWS
March 31, 1992
THE FOLLOWING excerpt from an article by Jeffrey Thomas, based on a 1989-1990 survey by the National Endowment for the Humanities of 481 schoolteacher, appears in the March/April issue of the NEH publication Humanities:High school teachers of U.S. history are spending more classroom time teaching the twentieth century than the early history of the nation, running counter to the oft-stated complaint that teachers run out of teaching time at the end of...
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By THOMAS V. DiBACCO | February 12, 1995
The Smithsonian Institution's decision to scrap much of the Enola Gay exhibit should teach Americans that controversy is the inherent price of rewriting history.Rather than adhere to the original plan of providing viewers with a 10,000-square-foot exhibit and a 600-page script that, in part, was critical of American decisions, museum officials decided to present only the fuselage of the famous plane.History will be limited to a small plaque delineating essential facts of the bombing.For years the prevalent interpretation of President Harry S. Truman's decision to use atomic weaponry was that it was the only alternative.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Barbara Ann Gordon, a retired city public school educator who taught history and social studies and in retirement was a library volunteer, died Feb. 5 of breast cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 65. Born in Baltimore and raised in Parkville, Ms. Gordon was a 1963 graduate of Parkville High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1967 from Wake Forest University, she began teaching social studies at Southern High School. From 1974 to retiring in 1997, she taught world history and U.S. history at Lake Clifton-Eastern High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Crivello and By Donna Crivello,Special to the Sun | January 6, 2002
Salt: A World History, by Mark Kurlansky. Walker & Company. 484 pages. $28. Do we really know about salt? There it sits rather meekly on the dining table sharing a position with pepper. We reach for it to make our food taste better, even though we're cautioned against it, and some of us have recently found new respect for its pure form: fleur de sel. Perhaps some our sketchy memory of history might bring up the salt wars, or even Gandhi's salt marches. From earliest recorded history, salt was at the center of the world economy.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 24, 2012
A geographical blessing we in Maryland share is our proximity to our nation's capital. Regardless of politics,Washington, D.C., is a majestic city whose stature in national and world history is on par with the likes of London, Rome, Tokyo, Madrid, Alexandria and Constantinople. A key reason for its standing, in addition to the moral and economic strength of the nation behind it, is that it serves as more than a political capital. It also is home to a repositories of publicly-accessible documents and artifacts that are arguably the greatest collection of human knowledge ever compiled.
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By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A large segment of Americans think the Holocaust could happen again, according to a new survey, which found 42 percent believe it likely that the Jewish people will face a similar threat in coming years.Of that number, 17 percent said they considered another Holocaust"very likely" to occur somewhere in the world, and 25 percent rated it as "somewhat likely."The survey of attitudes toward the Holocaust -- in which an estimated 6 million European Jews perished -- also found that younger Americans tend to be significantly less informed.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 24, 2012
A geographical blessing we in Maryland share is our proximity to our nation's capital. Regardless of politics,Washington, D.C., is a majestic city whose stature in national and world history is on par with the likes of London, Rome, Tokyo, Madrid, Alexandria and Constantinople. A key reason for its standing, in addition to the moral and economic strength of the nation behind it, is that it serves as more than a political capital. It also is home to a repositories of publicly-accessible documents and artifacts that are arguably the greatest collection of human knowledge ever compiled.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Barbara Ann Gordon, a retired city public school educator who taught history and social studies and in retirement was a library volunteer, died Feb. 5 of breast cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 65. Born in Baltimore and raised in Parkville, Ms. Gordon was a 1963 graduate of Parkville High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1967 from Wake Forest University, she began teaching social studies at Southern High School. From 1974 to retiring in 1997, she taught world history and U.S. history at Lake Clifton-Eastern High School.
NEWS
August 31, 2008
The Glenwood library, 2350 Route 97, Cooksville, will sponsor a talk by Fred Glueckstein, author of The '27 Yankees and Mickey Mantle: Rookie in Pinstripes, on the history of the World Series. The talk, which includes a display of photographs of the series' greatest players, will be held at 2 p.m. Sept. 13. Information: 410-313-5577. A Web master needed A volunteer Web master is needed to update the Western Howard County Relay for Life Web site. The site uses a user-friendly template, and little experience is necessary.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 18, 2007
They just don't make 'em like Gelo anymore. Always dapper, always the consummate gentlemen, always prattling on about this horse and that jockey, this owner and that trainer. Always here, an 80-year-old man whose slow walk is almost a strut as he ambles around the Pimlico Race Course, hollers of "Gelo" (pronounced Jello) trailing him every step of the way. "Thank you, gentlemen, thanks a lot," the man with the top hat and tweed sports jacket says, nodding to the patrons parked in front of Simulcast screens as he walks by. "See you later, Gelo," they shout back.
TRAVEL
By Robert Cross | December 24, 2006
HAMILTON, BERMUDA -- I'm skeptical about beaches with big reputations. The ones billed as having pure white sand usually prove to be slightly beige. And pink beaches, the advertised draw of Bermuda, typically appear, to my eye at least, just ... sandy. "Some beaches along the South Shore are very pink," an employee of the 9 Beaches Bermuda resort insisted after I had pretty much given up the search. All nine beaches at 9 Beaches -- which is not on the South Shore -- were as pale and tan as cafe au lait.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 30, 2006
Jeff Miller might look like your everyday historical re-enactor when he dresses as a medic from the War of 1812. But that look is downright contemporary compared with some of the other characters and periods of history Miller portrays. Sometimes the 49-year-old Havre de Grace resident dons armor worn by Irish soldiers from the 17th century. At other times, he puts on chain mail and portrays a 16th-century Scottish mercenary. And sometimes he reaches way back and sports a tunic like those worn in A.D. 780 by warriors in Dal Riada, the Gaelic kingdom that became Scotland.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2005
Sixty-one years ago today, armed with a rifle, Lester Lease was part of one of the most significant military invasions in world history, and what he remembers of D-Day would sober any man. The blood in the frigid waters, the screams of dying men, the all-enveloping smoke of a massive beach bombardment - all was the stuff of nightmares for a 20-year-old platoon sergeant. "We did what we had to do," Lease, a lifelong Baltimorean, says of June 6, 1944, the day that marked the beginning of the liberation of Europe in World War II. "I'd do it again.
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