Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWorld Health Organization
IN THE NEWS

World Health Organization

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 23, 2006
Dr. Lee Jong Wook, director-general of the World Health Organization and the driving force in that agency's effort to expand AIDS treatment to the developing world, died yesterday in Geneva after surgery to remove a blood clot from his brain. The first Korean to head a United Nations agency, Dr. Lee was 61. A 23-year veteran of WHO, Dr. Lee played a key role in eliminating polio from the Western Pacific and organizing the battle against tuberculosis before taking the agency's reins in the aftermath of the SARS epidemic and amid the initial signs of the avian flu crisis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2014
President Barack Obama announced today that he will send up to 3,000 health workers and military personnel to Liberia to help stem the outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa that has paralyzed the health system there and threatened the lives of millions of people in the region. It's about time. The epidemic represents a crisis of global dimensions, and the fight against it requires the U.S. to take a leadership role if the effort is to succeed. We can only wonder how many lives could have been saved if the Obama administration had taken these steps - and more - weeks ago. The World Health Organization estimates that as many as 20,000 people could be infected by the Ebola virus in the coming months, which would make it the largest outbreak in history.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 2003
The World Health Organization removed Toronto from its SARS watch list yesterday, leaving Taiwan as the only place the organization says the virus has evaded full control. Toronto received the all-clear from the World Health Organization after 20 days had passed without a new case of the respiratory illness, which has infected more than 8,400 people worldwide and killed more than 800 since it first emerged in southern China late last year. "This is a great achievement for public health in what we hope is the final phase of the global emergency," said David Heymann, WHO executive director for communicable diseases.
HEALTH
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
As the Ebola virus ravages West Africa, two American health workers who contracted the disease in Liberia were airlifted back to the United States to be treated with an experimental drug. They have since recovered. But colleagues of a doctor in Sierra Leone, stricken as he led his country's fight against the virus, decided against giving him the same medicine. He has since died. The worst Ebola outbreak in history, combined with the existence, in small amounts, of untested drugs that might prove effective in combating it, is raising questions about the ethics of fighting an epidemic.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 19, 1995
The smallpox virus got an unexpected stay of execution yesterday from the governing board of the World Health Organization.The last known stocks of the deadly virus were to be destroyed in June, but the latest decision puts off its demise for at least a year, and perhaps indefinitely.In 1980, after a worldwide vaccination program, the World Health Organization declared the eradication of natural smallpox, one of the biggest killers in history. But samples of the virus have been kept frozen in laboratories in the United States and Russia.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 2, 2004
JAKARTA, Indonesia - The World Health Organization said yesterday that two sisters who died in Vietnam's Thai Binh province last week were victims of avian influenza and might have contracted the disease from their brother. If confirmed, the sisters' deaths would represent the first human-to-human transmission of the illness. Until now, health officials had concluded that human victims in Vietnam and Thailand were contracting the virus through direct contact with infected fowl. The deaths of the two women bring to 10 the number of confirmed bird flu deaths in Vietnam.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 2003
SINGAPORE - The Singapore Health Ministry said yesterday that it had confirmed a new case of SARS in a 27-year-old postdoctoral researcher who worked in two of the city's medical laboratories. The case is the first since the World Health Organization said in July that the highly contagious disease had been contained worldwide. The acting minister of health, Dr. Khaw Boon Wan, said at a news conference here that the man's case represented a "low public health risk." He was confident that the case did not represent a new outbreak of SARS because the patient's symptoms had been "picked up early" and he had been "isolated early," he said.
NEWS
April 12, 1995
William Terry Wells, 75, inventor of the fireplace furnace, died Friday at his home in rural Arizona. His invention, known as a Wells fireplace, used outside air for combustion and directed heated air through ducts for warming. His company, Wells Fireplaces, has manufactured the devices since 1976.Dr. Irvin M. Lourie, 78, who overcame a quota system that kept Jews out of U.S. medical schools to become a pioneer physician of the World Health Organization, died April 4 of heart failure in San Diego.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 2006
Because detecting avian flu with standard tests is so difficult and time-consuming, waiting for laboratory confirmation of an outbreak would cause dangerous treatment delays, according to new studies of two flu outbreaks. The studies, published Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine, were of family clusters of flu cases in Turkey and Indonesia. Rapid tests on nose and throat swabs failed every time, and in Turkey, so did all follow-up tests known as Elisas. The only tests that consistently worked were polymerase chain reaction tests, or PCRs, which can be performed only in advanced laboratories and which take several hours.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 2003
GENEVA, Switzerland - It took until mid-March - nearly four months after the first outbreak - for the world to learn of SARS. Yet a look at the early days of the epidemic, and at the earliest warnings given to the World Health Organization, leaves little doubt that the agency acted as swiftly as it could. Some opportunities were missed along the way, and the WHO was led astray by assumptions that later proved wrong. But public health experts say that the WHO's investigators are only as powerful as the information they have to work with.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit that officially opened today in Washington is as notable for what isn't on the agenda as for what is. The meeting between President Barack Obama and more than 40 African heads of state has been billed as forum for talks on security issues, foreign investment and economic development on the continent. But so far, at least, the recent outbreak of deadly Ebola virus in three African nations has remained absent from the official agenda. Mr. Obama needs to take this opportunity to strengthen cooperation between the U.S. and its African partners in efforts to bring the epidemic under control and provide the resources needed to prevent its spread.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
NEWS
January 2, 2014
Last Friday, I appeared on the Marc Steiner show to discuss marijuana policy.  Also on the panel were state Sens. Jamie Raskin Bobby Zirkin (Democrats from Montgomery and Baltimore counties, respectively). You can listen to a podcast of the show by clicking here . Needless to say, I was the only person in the discussion, including the host, who did not favor the full legalization of marijuana.  As you listen, here are a couple of tidbits that I added to the discussion in addition to my December op-ed in the Baltimore Sun and my piece on this blog discussing the harms of marijuana use.  First, I shared the results of a recent University of Michigan survey which found that 60 percent of high school seniors believe that marijuana use is harmless.
NEWS
October 30, 2013
Officials at the World Health Organization warned this week that a recent outbreak of polio among children in Syria potentially could threaten the entire region unless urgent steps are taken to halt its spread. The United Nations reported that the two-and-a half-year Syrian civil war has devastated the country's health-care system, disrupted vaccination programs and left millions of families living in squalid refugee camps whose unsanitary conditions make them ideal breeding grounds for diseases like polio.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Dr. Richard Harold Morrow Jr., a physician and Johns Hopkins public health official and who had worked in Ghana and Uganda, died of pancreatic cancer Aug. 17 at his home in the Bare Hills section of Baltimore County. He was 81. Hopkins colleagues described him as a pioneer in international public health. He was the recipient of a 2006 Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Public Health Association's International Health Section. "He was a man of both humility and brilliance," said Dr. Adnan A. Hyder, a Hopkins professor of international health, who lives in Lutherville.
NEWS
By Henry I. Miller | April 22, 2010
—Last June, the United Nations' World Health Organization, responding to an outbreak of the H1N1 virus, or swine flu, boosted the pandemic alert to the highest level, Phase 6, meaning that a pandemic was under way. It was the first time in 41 years that the organization had taken that declared step. But the outbreak appears to have ended less like the rogue wild boar that WHO bureaucrats predicted and more like a roasted pork tenderloin with apples and sage. In fact, the WHO repeatedly violated Sherlock Holmes' warning, "It is a capital mistake to theorize before you have all the evidence."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
World leaders in public health joined scientists and politicians in signing a declaration of "health rights" yesterday at festivities commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.Officials signed a 10-foot parchment scroll that declares health care a "human right." It stresses the need to prevent childhood illness and ensure dignity and a high quality of life for the elderly -- "not merely extend life.""Health care is a human right: It is not a privilege reserved for those with power, money or social access," says the first of nine "rights" enumerated in the declaration.
NEWS
June 6, 1998
LOOKING toward the 21st century, the World Health Organization projects significant gains in health benefits. But troubling gaps remain between affluent and developing countries.In the industrialized world, the support and care of an aging population will be an increasingly urgent concern. Consider that France, which in 1950 had about 200 people who reached the age of 100, is projected to have 150,000 centenarians by 2050.In poor countries, fewer people will live to see old age. But the longevity gap is closing, as more children are vaccinated against common childhood diseases and more people have access to clean water and adequate sanitation facilities.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
Jennifer Debnam cringes every time she hears a television report or reads a newspaper article about the H1N1 flu pandemic and - inevitably - comes to the part where the disease is called "swine flu." Debnam raises 12,000 hogs a year on her family's Kent County farm and she, like others in the industry, is losing megabucks this year - which they attribute to the misperception that you can catch flu from eating pork chops or a plate of ribs. Exports (and prices) are down sharply as Russia and China have put major restrictions on American pork products after questioning the health of the nation's hog population, experts said.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Thomas H. Maugh II and Tracy Wilkinson and Thomas H. Maugh II,Tribune Newspapers | April 26, 2009
MEXICO CITY - International officials declared the swine flu outbreak in Mexico and the U.S. a "public health emergency" Saturday as new cases were reported north and south of the border and fears grew of a global epidemic. The Mexican government indicated Saturday that the outbreak was more severe than originally acknowledged, announcing that more than 1,300 people are believed to have been infected. The virus, which the top official of the World Health Organization said had "pandemic potential," is now suspected in the deaths of 81 people here, Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.