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NEWS
June 10, 2010
In a world confronted by political, economic and social unrest, Peter Morici offers some sobering realities worthy of further discussion. ("Is sun setting on democratic capitalism?" June 8). Bring him back for future articles on any of the many provocative subjects raised in his article. For starters: How to preserve democratic capitalism while reigning in some of its more egregious excesses. How to define the proper role of government and the public sector which is now sucking vitality from the private sector.
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NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | October 17, 2013
I've spent the last two weeks in Latin America - where they know something about defaulting on public debts. As part of a bipartisan group of former U.S. ambassadors, I met with business leaders, central bankers, government officials and ordinary citizens. They all asked: what is going on in the U.S. Congress? Is the U.S. really going to default on its debt because of the political game playing? Along with my traveling companions, Republicans as well as Democrats, I repeatedly reassured them that we were confident that cooler heads would prevail and default would be avoided.
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NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | September 27, 1992
Could it be that the first rays of real hope are beginning t shine through the enduring gloom of the longest global economic downturn in recent memory?This may seem a strange observation with the world's currency markets in turmoil, European union in limbo and the Bush re-election campaign in trouble.But though we may not be at the new dawn just yet, we could now be witnessing the early signs of better times ahead, probably starting next year.There are immense problems still at home and abroad.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
One of the world's largest container companies chose Baltimore over other East Coast cities as its first U.S. stop for direct shipping from Northern Europe after a long courtship by Maryland officials and private business leaders. The service by Hapag-Lloyd AG, which starts in February, will boost container traffic at the port of Baltimore by roughly 10 percent, increasing the number of waterfront jobs and further raising the region's profile within the maritime industry, state officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 1999
TOKYO -- After a dazzling century in which Japan emerged on the globe first as a feared military power and then as a formidable economic one, its influence may be on the wane.The problem is not the economic crisis that dominates the headlines, but a pair of intertwined long-run concerns: The work force is shrinking fast, and Japan undermines its economy's productivity by squandering money on life support for moribund industries and backward regions.In the next few decades, unless Japan manages to arrest current trends, it may find that its share of global economic output has shrunk considerably.
NEWS
June 13, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Corriere della Sera, of Milan, Italy, which was published Wednesday.AFTER nine years of economic expansion, the United States continues to be the economic motor of the world. But what will happen if Wall Street suddenly gives in?According to International Monetary Fund economists, the growth of the U.S. economy would stop, and the euro's value would strengthen with respect to the dollar. But with minimal growth and a less competitive exchange rate, the European economy would slow down.
NEWS
By FRANZ SCHURMANN | July 11, 1993
Even if the agreements reached at the G-7 Tokyo economic summitshould fall apart, NAFTA not pass Congress and GATT founder on European resistance, there is no way the world economy can be undone -- unless the world gives up on economic growth. And because the ineradicable flip side of the world economy is global migration, there also is no way it can be stopped.As these twin dynamics gain ground, the vision of European unity fades, along with giant regional economies in Europe, East Asia and North America.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Saying that traditional measure underestimate the economies in developing countries, the International Monetary Fund has concluded that China's economy is more than four times bigger than previously measured. That makes it the third largest, behind the United States and Japan.In a study to be released next week, the IMF also greatly increases estimates of the economies of India, Indonesia, Mexico, Brazil and other developing countries.Until now, most studies have measured each country's output by valuing its goods and services in dollars, using international exchange rates.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
Until now, the United States has been strong in the face of enormous weakness in the global economy, but three local business leaders said yesterday that expectations need to be moderated.George A. Roche, chairman and president of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc., told a business outlook conference that he expects a slowdown in the second half of 1999.His fellow panelists -- Abraham Gulkowitz, chief global strategist and director of economics and strategy for BT Alex. Brown, and Raymond A. Mason, Legg Mason Inc.'s chairman and chief executive -- agreed.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | July 9, 1992
MUNICH, Germany -- Intentions, suggestions and recommendations abounded. But the "J" word was missing from the economic summit.Jobs, the mantra that the U.S. administration repeats in hopes of obtaining re-election, was mentioned in every U.S. briefing, every photo opportunity and even in the Group of Seven's economic declaration. But concrete plans to create them were missing as the summit ended yesterday.Not only was economic help lacking, but President Bush himself seemed invisible during the three days of negotiations.
NEWS
June 10, 2010
In a world confronted by political, economic and social unrest, Peter Morici offers some sobering realities worthy of further discussion. ("Is sun setting on democratic capitalism?" June 8). Bring him back for future articles on any of the many provocative subjects raised in his article. For starters: How to preserve democratic capitalism while reigning in some of its more egregious excesses. How to define the proper role of government and the public sector which is now sucking vitality from the private sector.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff | April 10, 2005
The World Is Flat By Thomas L. Friedman. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 488 pages. $26. When Thomas Edison invented the light bulb in 1879, electric lights did not immediately go on throughout the United States. That may seem a small insight in 2005, but the electrification of the country is a meaningful pointer to the profound technological and social changes about to engulf us. Edison and his co-workers, after their successful experiments in 1879, tested some 6,000 materials for use as filaments, and electrification on a significant scale remained decades in the future.
NEWS
September 7, 2003
GIVEN THE ISLAMIC world's role in President Bush's first term, it's hard to believe any other part of the globe could end up a key factor in his re-election bid next year. But look out for China. The rising behemoth's growing integration with the U.S. economy is causing plenty of trouble for Mr. Bush -- under whom America has been losing 80,000 jobs a month, many in manufacturing and many to Chinese factories. Politicking over Labor Day, the president finally cast jobs, not tax cuts, as domestic Job 1. He didn't directly cite China, but even as he spoke, Treasury Secretary John W. Snow was Beijing-bound to lean on China to strengthen its controlled currency.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 9, 2003
President Bush says the conflict with Iraq is not about oil. The aftermath of a war, however, could be all about oil. The duration and success of any military action - and whether Saddam Hussein sabotages his oil fields as he did a decade ago in Kuwait - could determine oil prices for months or years and, in turn, affect the health of economies around the world, analysts say. As oil prices spiked to a two-year high of $35 a barrel on Friday, reflecting war...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 27, 2002
VIENNA - OPEC ministers agreed yesterday to keep production quotas at an 11-year low to maintain oil prices at about $25 a barrel at a time of slowing world demand. Members said they want to increase output after their September meeting, choosing for now to wait for world economies to rebound. Concern about possible disruptions to oil supplies because of violence in the Middle East has contributed to a 26 percent jump in prices this year to $25.24 a barrel in London. "The current price is reasonable," said Saudi Arabia's oil minister, Ali al-Naimi.
TOPIC
September 24, 2000
THE WORLD is having a good year: The International Monetary Fund's annual report, released last week, forecasts 4.7 percent growth in the global economy this year, up from 3.3 percent last year and the most in more than a decade. Almost every part of the world is sharing in the gain. Asian countries and Russia, economic crisis points in 1997 and 1998, are recovering. Japan seems to be emerging from a decade of stagnation. The European Union and the United States are prosperous. Much of Latin America is doing well.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 5, 1992
Tokyo -- Even the businessmen who tear up the world's electronics and automobile markets don't always get it right.Last summer and fall, economists here say, the men who head some of this country's top corporations got it so wrong that they sharply steepened and deepened the Japanese economic downturn now sending ripples through the world economy.Now, some economists say, Japan's economy may not recover until 1994."When a balloon breaks, you can't make it start expanding again just by blowing more air into it," Tetsuo Tsukimura, chief economist for Smith Barney, Harris Upham Japan, said last week.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
How far will the dollar drop against the yen? Only three months ago, eyes rolled when for the first time the greenback bought less than 100 yen. Since then its course has been down, down, down, dropping below 80 yen to the dollar momentarily in trading Wednesday. Some market speculators see nothing in sight to stop the free-fall other than fleeting upward blips.Is this ground for concern? President Clinton and Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin talk piously about a strong dollar being good for the U.S. economy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 1999
TOKYO -- After a dazzling century in which Japan emerged on the globe first as a feared military power and then as a formidable economic one, its influence may be on the wane.The problem is not the economic crisis that dominates the headlines, but a pair of intertwined long-run concerns: The work force is shrinking fast, and Japan undermines its economy's productivity by squandering money on life support for moribund industries and backward regions.In the next few decades, unless Japan manages to arrest current trends, it may find that its share of global economic output has shrunk considerably.
NEWS
June 13, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Corriere della Sera, of Milan, Italy, which was published Wednesday.AFTER nine years of economic expansion, the United States continues to be the economic motor of the world. But what will happen if Wall Street suddenly gives in?According to International Monetary Fund economists, the growth of the U.S. economy would stop, and the euro's value would strengthen with respect to the dollar. But with minimal growth and a less competitive exchange rate, the European economy would slow down.
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