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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 15, 1999
NAIROBI, Kenya -- NATO's decision to use military force in Kosovo has reinforced the view among many Africans that the world community is less inclined to intervene to halt conflicts in Africa than it is in many other regions.Coming as East Africa marks the fifth anniversary of a three-month ethnic rampage in Rwanda that killed an estimated 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutus, the intervention in Yugoslavia has sparked a debate about when and for whom world powers are willing to take action.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 2, 2014
In keeping with his determination to get America off "a perpetual wartime footing" after more than a decade of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, President Obama's commencement address at West Point was a sobering preview of what lies ahead for the graduates. Before an audience of the newly minted military officers, he sought at length to make the case for a selective response to global and regional challenges. He argued that this country must make hard choices about when and where the nation's might can be exerted as the leading partner in the world community.
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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHMOOKLER | January 25, 1993
A number of those who question our sending American troops to help save 2 million Somalis from starvation ask: How does this crisis on the Horn of Africa concern our national interest? This is the wrong question.It may have been right in the old world order of international anarchy. But this habitual way of thinking is now the greatest impediment to our creating a new, far better kind of world.For the past year -- as thousands have perished from the rule of the gun in Somalia and in the former Yugoslavia -- the world community, including the United States, has committed on a global scale the same sin that three decades ago this country contemplated with horror in the matter of Kitty Genovese.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 2, 2012
One of the more intriguing aspects of Campaign 2012 is the impact of Obama administration rhetoric and policies on the Jewish vote. Obama supporters dismiss any thought of discord among this vital Democratic constituency. They point to sustained Jewish support for Democratic presidential candidates in every presidential election cycle. Indeed, it is a rare occasion when the Democratic nominee fails to garner 65 percent of the Jewish vote. And this year's Republican ticket fits their preferred narrative to a T. In Mitt Romney, they see a conservative Mormon businessman with a tea party favorite as his running mate.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
ANARCHY in Sierra Leone is a threat to larger Africa. By taking hundreds of United Nations peacekeeping troops hostage, ragtag rebels supporting Foday Sankoh have undermined the chief tool the world community and African leaders have devised for dispute resolution on the continent. Peacekeepers come in after peace is agreed, to maintain its terms and create confidence. Mr. Sankoh agreed last July to quit insurrection and join the elected government of Ahmad Tejan Kabbah. He just didn't mean it. The troops sent to police the accord, mostly Zambians, were lightly trained and not expecting war. Mr. Sankoh's followers had little difficulty disarming many, stealing their vehicles and mowing down protesting civilians.
NEWS
October 7, 1995
NIGERIA WILL be more isolated in the world community than ever. Hopes had been raised that its dictator, Gen. Sani Abacha, would use the 35th anniversary of independence on Oct. 1 to grant reforms leading to democracy. He used the occasion, instead, to stonewall.Rather than implement the 1993 election by bringing Chief Moshood K. O. Abiola out of prison as interim president; rather than institute speedy and fair new elections; rather than hand over to caretakers, General Abacha claimed power for three more years.
NEWS
By ANDREW BARD SCHMOOKLER | May 6, 1993
Silver Spring -- Unless the carnage in Bosnia now stops, the world community should bring force to bear: a U.N.-sanctioned, multi- national use of air power.Some object that air power alone will not work. By ''work'' they mean compel the Serbs to cease their aggression and atrocities and to abide by the Vance-Owen plan. Whether air strikes will force Serbian compliance is an open question (although the way the Serbs have moderated their position every time the threat of international force has become more credible -- as in last weekend's signing of the peace accords -- affords some grounds for hope)
NEWS
By Andrew B. Schmookler | November 25, 1990
Silver Spring. SHOULD the United States go to war in the Persian Gulf in the next few months? One cannot envy President Bush having to make this extremely difficult decision. Some, however, fear that the president has effectively taken the power of choice out of his own hands, that he has painted himself into a corner from which he can only proceed to war.Is this true? Once the military build-up is complete, is an ignominious embarrassment the only alternative to attacking Iraq? No, there is a graceful -- even a constructive -- way to back off.Imagine that the international community has refused to give its blessing -- in the U.N. -- to the American use of military power that the president is obviously contemplating.
NEWS
By Andrew B. Schmookler | September 29, 1990
Silver Spring.---OK. LET'S SAY the ''optimistic'' scenario plays out. The weight of international opinion and the pinch of the embargo compel Saddam Hussein to meet our terms. He pulls his troops out of Kuwait and lets our people go. A successful resolution of the crisis? I think not.The status quo ante is not good enough. Even before the invasion of Kuwait, some observers called Saddam Hussein ''the most dangerous man in the world.'' Even before this crisis, the world stood on the threshold of a new era still awaiting definition: Would the world, freed of the bonds of the Cold War, slide backward into the chaos of global fragmentation or forward toward a more secure and just world order?
NEWS
April 23, 2006
A breakthrough is possible soon in resolving the bloody, 3-year-old ethnic conflict in Darfur, but only if the world community rises up and demands it. Reignited peace talks between the Sudanese Islamist regime in Khartoum and the Darfur rebels are believed to be on the verge of success or collapse by the end of this month. Their fate will likely determine whether displaced black Muslim tribal villagers from Darfur can return home in the foreseeable future or whether the expanding conflict rages on - inflicting rape, robbery and murder on millions of innocents.
NEWS
December 7, 2008
The desperate plight of civilians caught between warring militias in the Democratic Republic of Congo was underscored last week by three Congolese church leaders who visited Baltimore to deliver an urgent appeal for help. The two bishops, accompanied by a nun, spoke at the Catholic Relief Services headquarters in downtown Baltimore, where they related the havoc wrought by militia groups and bandits who have raped and massacred thousands of innocent civilians and driven a quarter-million refuges from their homes since fighting flared up again in August.
NEWS
April 23, 2006
A breakthrough is possible soon in resolving the bloody, 3-year-old ethnic conflict in Darfur, but only if the world community rises up and demands it. Reignited peace talks between the Sudanese Islamist regime in Khartoum and the Darfur rebels are believed to be on the verge of success or collapse by the end of this month. Their fate will likely determine whether displaced black Muslim tribal villagers from Darfur can return home in the foreseeable future or whether the expanding conflict rages on - inflicting rape, robbery and murder on millions of innocents.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick and Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 24, 2004
BEIJING - This week's explosion of rail cars in North Korea killed more than 100 people and injured 1,249, aid groups said yesterday, figures sharply lower than initial reports. The new numbers came as the North Korean government finally acknowledged the accident and formally requested aid from the international community. Aid groups said the numbers would likely rise as more bodies were pulled from the rubble, although initial South Korean media reports of 3,000 casualties appear to be an exaggeration, though hundreds of houses were believed to have been damaged.
NEWS
November 6, 2003
Church Women United in Carroll County will sponsor worship services tomorrow in honor of World Community Day. The theme of the worship will be "Circles of Love." World Community Day brings together Christian women of different denominations in a worship experience that focuses on peace and justice issues. Services will be held at 11 a.m. at Johnsville United Methodist Church, 1124 Johnsville Road, Eldersburg; at 7 p.m. Strawbridge United Methodist Church, 2901 Wakefield Valley Road, New Windsor; and 7 p.m. at Greenmount United Methodist Church, 2001 Hanover Pike.
NEWS
By Thomas Belton | September 7, 2003
WHAT PROPELS us into September is often hard to define. September doesn't even have a god's name such as Juno or Mars to guide us with its intent - just a simple statement that it's the seventh month in the old Roman calendar. The 11th of September, now, has a psychic reverberation, not just for Americans but for the world community as well. Nine-one-one - a set of numbers and a date that will persist in historical annals as the bellwether of a new millennia's consciousness, an enigmatic reminder that evil lurks in the hearts of some men. What usually propels us into September is a slight sense of melancholy; the end of summer and the beginning of fall; putting down baseball mitts and picking up school books; looking to winterize the old homestead for the gray skies ahead.
NEWS
November 15, 2001
Church Women United will hold its annual World Community Day Celebration at 7 p.m. tomorrow at Uniontown United Methodist Church. The speaker will be Pat Kennedy from Human Services Programs of Carroll County. The church is at 3405 Uniontown Road. Information: 410-848- 6940. Union Bridge firefighters to hold bingo banquet Union Bridge Volunteer Fire Company will hold a bingo banquet starting at 6 p.m. Saturday in the fire hall. A buffet will be served at 6 p.m. Tickets are $22.50 and include a card package.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick and Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 24, 2004
BEIJING - This week's explosion of rail cars in North Korea killed more than 100 people and injured 1,249, aid groups said yesterday, figures sharply lower than initial reports. The new numbers came as the North Korean government finally acknowledged the accident and formally requested aid from the international community. Aid groups said the numbers would likely rise as more bodies were pulled from the rubble, although initial South Korean media reports of 3,000 casualties appear to be an exaggeration, though hundreds of houses were believed to have been damaged.
NEWS
By Catherine O'Neill | August 1, 1994
IN THE world of humanitarian relief, the law of unintended consequences of good intentions is becoming ever more important.More than 1 million Rwandan people, most of them members of the Hutu clan, have been led out of Rwanda at the instigation of their own leaders. The Hutu faction had mercilessly slaughtered an estimated 500,000 Tutsis while the world community passively watched, cluck-clucking about man's continuing inhumanity to man but lifting nary a finger to stop the slaughter of the innocent children whose dying faces stared out at us for more than two months on evening news programs.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
ANARCHY in Sierra Leone is a threat to larger Africa. By taking hundreds of United Nations peacekeeping troops hostage, ragtag rebels supporting Foday Sankoh have undermined the chief tool the world community and African leaders have devised for dispute resolution on the continent. Peacekeepers come in after peace is agreed, to maintain its terms and create confidence. Mr. Sankoh agreed last July to quit insurrection and join the elected government of Ahmad Tejan Kabbah. He just didn't mean it. The troops sent to police the accord, mostly Zambians, were lightly trained and not expecting war. Mr. Sankoh's followers had little difficulty disarming many, stealing their vehicles and mowing down protesting civilians.
NEWS
February 10, 2000
CHINA'S rulers are not making it easier for Congress to authorize permanent normal trading relations or to welcome the country into the World Trade Organization. Their latest paranoid fantasy is a set of tough regulations over what people may post on the Internet. "State secrets," which might include anything not authorized to be said, are banned. As an experiment into whether censorship of e-mail and chat rooms is feasible, Beijing is performing a service for the police forces of the world.
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