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By Knight-Ridder | October 17, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Station WXPN-FM's (88.5) "World Cafe" is making its way into the world.Actually, it only goes to five other public radio stations, in such far-flung outposts as Duluth, Minn., Laramie, Wyo., and Spindale, N.C. Even so, public radio executives from here to Hawaii are watching response to the program, which began national broadcast on Monday.The reason is simple. If "World Cafe," with host David Dye and his eclectic mix of rhythm and blues, acoustic rock and just-out-of-the-box pop, takes hold outside Philadelphia, it could sow the seed of the biggest boon to public radio in years.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
At a crowded table in the cafe room at the Wegman's in Columbia, Ekaterina Pyankova greets people with the Russian word for hello: "privet. " A few feet away, Nadja Todt offers a German greeting: "Hallo. " And in the center of the room, Girija Duraiswami says "namaste," a Hindi word and gesture given for both greeting and bidding farewell. While uttering the word, she places her palms together before her chest and bends slightly forward. " 'Namaste' means, 'My soul is saluting the soul in you,'" said Duraiswami, a Columbia resident who grew up in India.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 11, 1994
One World CafeWhere: 904 S. Charles St.Hours: Monday to Thursday 6:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Friday 6:30 a.m.to 3 a.m.; Saturday 8 a.m. to 3 a.m.; Sunday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.Credit cards accepted: No.Features: Vegetarian fare, desserts.Non-smoking section? Yes.Call: (410) 234-0235.Prices: Around $5.***5/8 The One World Cafe looks like a hundred other places that have opened up recently -- the low-key and sometimes amateurish coffee bars and cafes. The ones where you can sit and read the paper and make a cup of cappuccino last indefinitely.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | July 22, 2013
Once a month, the cafe at the Wegmans in Columbia becomes a hub of international languages. At one table, you may find a group of people speaking Spanish. At the next table? Arabic. Sponsored and hosted by the Columbia Association, the monthly World Languages Cafe meetings provide a fun and free evening of “conversation, food and culture,” according to Laura Smit, CA's program manager for international exchange and multicultural programs. Smit, who started the cafe in March 2013, came across the idea in an article on a linguistic cafe in Leipzig, Germany, a few years ago. “The idea is to have a cafe, somewhere people could practice different languages either because they were learning a new language or they wanted to travel there,” says Smit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 22, 2001
Even the regulars thought that Sean Bolan's at 1236 S. Light St. would be serving wings and burgers when the pub opened its dining room a couple of weeks ago, says owner Ken Krucenski. Instead, the kitchen produces five Irish specialties: fish and chips, shepherd's pie, Irish stew, bangers and mash (sausage and mashed potatoes) and seafood chowder, each for $8.95. On Friday nights, things get a little fancier, with specials like salmon with a toasted walnut and dill sauce for $13.95. Sean Bolan's specializes in high-end beers, with 17 drafts on tap. The dining room is open for dinner only Monday through Friday, for lunch and dinner Saturday, and is closed Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2005
What is it about vegetarian restaurants and ponytails? Nearly every patron (and most of the servers) at One World Cafe on a recent weekday seemed to sport a ponytail. Some were shiny and bouncy, others gray and thin, springing from nearly bald heads, but ponytails were definitely the accessory du jour. Ponytails seem to represent a certain kind of still-in-the-'60s college sensibility, and One World Cafe is a certain kind of still-in-the-'60s vegetarian restaurant. Every college town seems to have one, and Baltimore is lucky to have one as fine and friendly as One World Cafe, across the street from the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
The One World Cafe has one big advantage for artists over museums like the Louvre and the Walters Art Gallery: You don't have to be dead to have your work shown there.You don't even have to be a great artist. Not in the burgeoning coffeehouse culture in Baltimore, where cafe art and cafe artists have become a vibrant part of the local art scene.Artists, who have complained for generations about the lack of gallery space in Baltimore, now find themselves with more and more wall space to cover.
FEATURES
By GARY DORSEY and GARY DORSEY,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - It was a bright, happy afternoon outside the WXPN radio studios. Madison Smartt Bell, author of often dark, disturbing stories, suddenly looked nervous about taking a seat in front of the microphone. He couldn't have made this up: Not just anybody goes to XPN studios to be recorded; even fewer not-just-anybodies perform with the legendary bassist and record producer Don Dixon. So while two technicians calibrated audio pickups for Bell's first recording on the World Cafe radio show and Dixon-the-legend detached an E string and let it hang from his acoustic guitar - the tap of a dangling string sounded ominously against the moody chord he'd just tuned - the author nervously fingered opening licks to "Layla" on his black Les Paul electric.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 21, 2002
After a little less than a year on the job, Michael Rork has left the Polo Grill (4 W. University Parkway) and gone back to the Eastern Shore. He had been functioning as the Polo Grill's executive chef while running his own restaurant, Michael Rork's Town Dock, in St. Michaels. "The original intent wasn't permanent," he says. "I'm the type of guy who likes to do more and more and more, and I can do more and more and more at my own little restaurant here. My focus is here, and my family is here."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 11, 1997
In the restaurant business, a sign that says "closed for renovations" too often means the place is closed for good. Not so with Stella's (1009 W. 36th St., 410-243-0051), the Italian restaurant owned by Cafe Hon's Denise Whiting. It was closed for much of the summer and fall, but has now reopened with a new awning, seating for 40 upstairs and a "somewhat abbreviated menu," says Whiting. Most noticeably, the pizza has disappeared.This is the kind of food that needs to be eaten with a glass of wine, but Stella's doesn't have a liquor license.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2011
From the outside, One World Cafe looks like it could be a small coffee joint housed in a one-story addition to a much taller brick building on the cusp of the Johns Hopkins' Homewood campus. In fact, if you walk past the few tables up front and the full service bar, you'll find it has a largish dining room with seating to accommodate, by my rough guesstimate, easily 40 to 50 diners. Its interior is not the only way the cafe offers more than meets the eye. 12:58 We entered very much looking forward to eating in a reliably vegetarian restaurant and specifically not seeking vegetarian renditions of meat-centric recipes — except for a veggie burger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | June 22, 2006
Whether you go to get juiced before a bar tour or just camp out for conversation, coffeehouses are ideal down-tempo destinations for a TV-less evening. (Laptops are OK, though.) A few cafes around town are open late enough to serve as post-dinner hangouts. All four of these have wireless Internet access. Though its kitchen closes at 10:30 p.m., One World Cafe (100 W. University Parkway, 410-235-5777) serves coffee, tea and other drinks 8 a.m.-2 a.m. Mondays-Saturdays. It's open Sundays, too, just not as late: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. The walls are deep yellow, and the crowd -- a lot of Johns Hopkins University students and staff -- is friendly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 20, 2005
What is it about vegetarian restaurants and ponytails? Nearly every patron (and most of the servers) at One World Cafe on a recent weekday seemed to sport a ponytail. Some were shiny and bouncy, others gray and thin, springing from nearly bald heads, but ponytails were definitely the accessory du jour. Ponytails seem to represent a certain kind of still-in-the-'60s college sensibility, and One World Cafe is a certain kind of still-in-the-'60s vegetarian restaurant. Every college town seems to have one, and Baltimore is lucky to have one as fine and friendly as One World Cafe, across the street from the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
By GARY DORSEY and GARY DORSEY,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - It was a bright, happy afternoon outside the WXPN radio studios. Madison Smartt Bell, author of often dark, disturbing stories, suddenly looked nervous about taking a seat in front of the microphone. He couldn't have made this up: Not just anybody goes to XPN studios to be recorded; even fewer not-just-anybodies perform with the legendary bassist and record producer Don Dixon. So while two technicians calibrated audio pickups for Bell's first recording on the World Cafe radio show and Dixon-the-legend detached an E string and let it hang from his acoustic guitar - the tap of a dangling string sounded ominously against the moody chord he'd just tuned - the author nervously fingered opening licks to "Layla" on his black Les Paul electric.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | March 21, 2002
After a little less than a year on the job, Michael Rork has left the Polo Grill (4 W. University Parkway) and gone back to the Eastern Shore. He had been functioning as the Polo Grill's executive chef while running his own restaurant, Michael Rork's Town Dock, in St. Michaels. "The original intent wasn't permanent," he says. "I'm the type of guy who likes to do more and more and more, and I can do more and more and more at my own little restaurant here. My focus is here, and my family is here."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 22, 2001
Even the regulars thought that Sean Bolan's at 1236 S. Light St. would be serving wings and burgers when the pub opened its dining room a couple of weeks ago, says owner Ken Krucenski. Instead, the kitchen produces five Irish specialties: fish and chips, shepherd's pie, Irish stew, bangers and mash (sausage and mashed potatoes) and seafood chowder, each for $8.95. On Friday nights, things get a little fancier, with specials like salmon with a toasted walnut and dill sauce for $13.95. Sean Bolan's specializes in high-end beers, with 17 drafts on tap. The dining room is open for dinner only Monday through Friday, for lunch and dinner Saturday, and is closed Sunday.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2001
Cafe art surrounds us these days, whether we're doing coffee at Donna's, lunch at Sascha's 527, martinis at the Ruby Lounge, dinner at Sobo or dessert at the One World Cafe. Cafes are full of art, but it's too diverse to be called a movement or even a school. At the City Cafe, Sandy Wexler just showed her abstract expressionist oils, including a nostalgic Homage to Franz Kline. At the One World Cafe, Dan Brown shows big paintings of women who look as if they've just stepped out of a 1940s film noir.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2001
The Book Market, a discount bookseller based in Knoxville, Tenn., will open four temporary stores in Maryland this fall, including two in former Bibelot bookstores. The privately held chain, which runs stores around the country on a short-term basis, will open Nov. 1 in former Bibelot bookstores in Canton and Pikesville, where they will operate at least through January, David Hinkle, president of the chain, said yesterday. Temporary stores also will open in Bel Air by the middle of next month and in Gaithersburg on Oct. 25. The chain, which takes temporary space as it is and sells books off flat tables at discounts of up to 80 percent, usually leases space for 90 days with an option to extend the time.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2001
The Book Market, a discount bookseller based in Knoxville, Tenn., will open four temporary stores in Maryland this fall, including two in former Bibelot bookstores. The privately held chain, which runs stores around the country on a short-term basis, will open Nov. 1 in former Bibelot bookstores in Canton and Pikesville, where they will operate at least through January, David Hinkle, president of the chain, said yesterday. Temporary stores also will open in Bel Air by the middle of next month and in Gaithersburg on Oct. 25. The chain, which takes temporary space as it is and sells books off flat tables at discounts of up to 80 percent, usually leases space for 90 days with an option to extend the time.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2001
Cafe art surrounds us these days, whether we're doing coffee at Donna's, lunch at Sascha's 527, martinis at the Ruby Lounge, dinner at Sobo or dessert at the One World Cafe. Cafes are full of art, but it's too diverse to be called a movement or even a school. At the City Cafe, Sandy Wexler just showed her abstract expressionist oils, including a nostalgic Homage to Franz Kline. At the One World Cafe, Dan Brown shows big paintings of women who look as if they've just stepped out of a 1940s film noir.
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