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World Aids Day

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HEALTH
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
Imploring residents to "talk, test and treat," local and state leaders and health officials gathered in the city Wednesday to mark World AIDS Day, remember past victims of HIV/AIDS and honor those living with the disease. The event, held at the Central Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, featured song, dance and poetry interspersed with the presentation of statistics: For instance, about 30,000 Marylanders are living with HIV/AIDS and are aware of it, and an additional 6,000-9,000 are unaware that they are HIV-positive.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 1, 2013
On Monday, Dec. 2, in support of World AIDS Day, the Harford County Health Department will offer free walk-in confidential or anonymous HIV testing at 1 N. Main Street in Bel Air, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Since 1988, World AIDS Day is observed annually on Dec. 1 by the National Centers for Disease Control along with public health partners locally and worldwide. According to the Harford Health Department, this year's theme, "Working Together for an AIDS-Free Generation," highlights the promise of new research and prevention efforts to help stop the spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, also known as HIV. Since the beginning of the epidemic, approximately 70 million people have been infected with HIV and more than 35 million people have died from the virus, making it one of the most destructive pandemics in history, the health department notes in a news release.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 1, 2013
On Monday, Dec. 2, in support of World AIDS Day, the Harford County Health Department will offer free walk-in confidential or anonymous HIV testing at 1 N. Main Street in Bel Air, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Since 1988, World AIDS Day is observed annually on Dec. 1 by the National Centers for Disease Control along with public health partners locally and worldwide. According to the Harford Health Department, this year's theme, "Working Together for an AIDS-Free Generation," highlights the promise of new research and prevention efforts to help stop the spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, also known as HIV. Since the beginning of the epidemic, approximately 70 million people have been infected with HIV and more than 35 million people have died from the virus, making it one of the most destructive pandemics in history, the health department notes in a news release.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
A small service and a moment of silence under a glowing-red Washington Monument commemorated World AIDS Day in Mount Vernon Sunday evening. The Rev. Joseph Muth of St. Matthew Catholic Church on Loch Raven Boulevard told the roughly two dozen gathered in Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church before the monument lighting that the city's goal is to "get to zero. " "When we were in school, zero was a failure," Muth said. "Now we're in a different school. " He looks forward, he said, to the day when the city can report "zero new infected, zero deaths and zero discrimination of those who are infected" with HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
Baltimore will join cities across the nation today and deck a signature landmark in red lights to observe World AIDS Day. The Monumental City has chosen the Washington Monument in Mount Vernon Place and will turn the nearly 200-foot tower crimson at 7 p.m. Ten American cities are participating in the observance to raise awareness and funds to fight the AIDS epidemic in Africa, where it's reported that 22 million people are coping with the disease...
NEWS
November 23, 1992
Western Maryland College will observe World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, with several events to promote knowledge of the deadly disease.World AIDS Day is an international response to the global spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome crisis. A Western Maryland senior organized the campus events for a class project.The campus observance will include "Day Without Art," in which sheets will be placed over many works of art at the college, and "Night Without Light," in which the steeple lights on Baker Memorial Chapel will be turned off for a few minutes.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
With a candlelight vigil tonight and a countywide conference tomorrow, Howard County health officials and members of the interfaith community will join HIV carriers and their families to commemorate World AIDS Day, which is tomorrow.The events will focus on the rights and treatment of those who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), also called the AIDS virus."This is not just a health issue," said the Rev. Douglas Hunt, pastor of Columbia United Christian Church, which is the host for tonight's vigil at the Oakland Mills Meeting House at 5885 Robert Oliver Place.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 3, 1993
We had World AIDS Day on Wednesday. And as world days go, it was a wild success.It was the only world day on which you could see a giant pink condom encase a 75-foot obelisk in Paris while, an ocean away, the president of the United States calmly listens to a heckler accuse him of hiding behind AIDS quilts.Certainly, there was great theater. The White House dimmed its lights to honor the dying. Liza Minnelli sang at the United Nations. Around the world, there were speeches and parades and street-corner condom handouts.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
In recognition of World AIDS Day, which formally took place Wednesday, Howard County residents can see panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt and attend lectures on the illness today and tomorrow at Howard Community College.This is the first time parts of the quilt have appeared in Howard County.The free two-day event marks the county's biggest commemoration of World AIDS Day, begun six years ago by the World Health Organization to promote education about the disease."In the past, efforts have been sort of scattered," said Kathy Jones, an event organizer who works in Howard Community College's Office of Continuing Education.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | November 28, 1993
Carroll Community College will mark World AIDS Day with somber reminders and factual displays during a three-hour exhibit Wednesday in the Great Hall."
HEALTH
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2010
Imploring residents to "talk, test and treat," local and state leaders and health officials gathered in the city Wednesday to mark World AIDS Day, remember past victims of HIV/AIDS and honor those living with the disease. The event, held at the Central Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, featured song, dance and poetry interspersed with the presentation of statistics: For instance, about 30,000 Marylanders are living with HIV/AIDS and are aware of it, and an additional 6,000-9,000 are unaware that they are HIV-positive.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
Body found in Back Creek might be that of houseboater 2 A body found Monday morning in Back Creek in Annapolis was believed to be that of a man who lived on a nearby houseboat. The body's sighting was reported to police about 9 a.m., according to Annapolis police spokesman Ray Weaver. Officers went to the area, near Bert Jabin's Yacht Yard, and turned the investigation over to Maryland Natural Resources Police. Last Tuesday, police took a report that Heino Hans Gerard Hopp, 62, was missing and his dinghy found adrift in Back Creek, said NRP Sgt. Art Windemuth.
NEWS
By Ken Hackett | December 1, 2008
In remote villages throughout Africa, most people appear far removed from the financial crisis rolling through much of the world. The economy these villagers encounter is unconcerned with complex financial instruments and liquidity on Wall Street. But millions of these men, women and children will suffer the consequences of this crisis unless the new administration and Congress refuse to let the poorest of the poor suffer due to the mistakes of the richest of the rich. Many expect an Obama administration to be very friendly toward Africa; it is not every day that the United States gets a president with a Kenyan father and a Swahili name.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | December 3, 2007
A Towson University graduate who contracted the disease from a drug-abusing boyfriend who pressured her to have unprotected sex. A Parkville phone company employee who thought her relationship was monogamous. A University of Maryland horticulture student diagnosed with the disease just years after college. All three of these victims of HIV/AIDS are Jewish Pikesville natives. One - College Park graduate Steven Kaufman - is dead. But his memory lives on through the organization his family founded after his death in 1990, and it was honored at a World AIDS Day event the group co-sponsored yesterday with the Towson University Athletic Department.
NEWS
November 30, 2004
Ballots due Dec. 6 in local election for Farm Service Agency The Carroll County Farm Service Agency reminds farmers, ranchers and other eligible voters to cast ballots in the local county committee election before the Dec. 6 deadline. Ballots were mailed to eligible voters this month. Eligible producers who did not receive ballots should contact the local farm service agency office at 410-848-2780. Ballots must be returned to agency offices or postmarked by Dec. 6. All ballots will be counted publicly by Dec. 20. Elections may be challenged by nominees within 15 days after results are posted.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2003
A year after Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley declared a state of emergency in the battle against AIDS, health officials say they're worried that a drop in AIDS cases could lead to public complacency. "While AIDS is becoming more and more a chronic disease and less of a fatal disease, we want to avoid media fatigue from setting in and an attitude where people feel they can ignore what's still a very serious threat," said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, city health commissioner. The number of city residents dying of AIDS has dropped steadily over the past decade, from 959 in 1993 to 93 last year, he said.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Maryland AIDS Administration; U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; World Health OrganizationSun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
By 9:35 on a typical morning at a downtown Baltimore AIDS clinic, nearly a dozen HIV-positive children already wait impatiently to see the doctor. Some read or color with crayons; others stare straight ahead -- they are too sick to play.The children are brought to this University of Maryland clinic by their HIV-positive mothers or by whatever adult remains in their lives in the wake of the AIDS epidemic: grandmothers, aunts, the occasional father, a foster parent.Families like these are the focus today of the seventh annual World AIDS Day, an observance begun by the United Nations to call attention to the estimated 14 million people worldwide who are living with the virus that causes AIDS or who already have the disease.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
With a quilt display today and a candlelight vigil this evening, health officials and medical professionals will join people infected with AIDS and the human immunodeficiency virus and their families to commemorate World AIDS Day at area colleges and medical centers.In Baltimore, an estimated 14,000 people are living with AIDS, and roughly half are not receiving care for the disease, according to officials at University of Maryland Medical Center.The medical center, at 22 S. Greene St. in downtown Baltimore, is holding a series of events to increase awareness of the magnitude of the HIV/AIDS epidemic -- including a presentation by Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the clinical program for the Institute of Human Virology.
NEWS
December 2, 2003
ON WORLD AIDS Day, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao yesterday visited and shook hands with three AIDS patients at a Beijing hospital. Along with China's recent decision to begin distributing free anti-retroviral drugs to some HIV-positive citizens, the unprecedented, highly symbolic visit was another sign that the world's largest nation may finally be getting serious about one of the world's fastest-growing AIDS problems. If so, it's a desperately needed switch from the Chinese leadership's years of unconscionable denials in the face of spreading AIDS problems on the mainland.
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