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By Karen Hosler and Mark Matthews and Karen Hosler and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | March 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush returned to the foreign affairs arena yesterday -- a place he has not visited much during the political campaign in the face of criticism that he wasn't paying enough attention to domestic issues.But buoyed by Super Tuesday's primaries that all but assured his nomination, the president appeared yesterday to be more willing to talk again in global terms.He started by endorsing for the first time an internationally financed effort to help Russia stabilize the ruble and make it convertible to international currencies, signaling that he may be ready to announce U.S. participation later this spring.
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NEWS
March 14, 2013
Newly elected Pope Francis represents change in many respects. He is the first pope from the New World (and the first from outside of Europe in 1,200 years), the first Jesuit and the first Francis. But for American Catholics, who in poll after poll in recent weeks have expressed disagreement with the church's stances on the ordination of women or the requirement of celibacy for priests, he may seem like more of the same. Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, is a doctrinaire conservative in those matters, as were Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II before him. Given the views of the College of Cardinals - all of whom were appointed by John Paul or Benedict - it could hardly have been otherwise.
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NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Although voters might not know it from the campaign so far, the next president will face issues beyond tax cuts, health insurance and Bob Jones University. Global terrorism, for example. A swelling trade deficit. A brooding, strengthening China. A desperate Russia. An unstable, war-torn Africa. Yet in keeping with other post-Cold War presidential campaigns, foreign policy has been largely blotted out by domestic issues in the election of 2000. While all four leading candidates "are hovered around the center" on foreign policy, according to James Goldgeier, a professor at George Washington University, their positions differ enough to have generated a vigorous debate.
NEWS
November 3, 2012
Before voting for president next week, I hope intelligent people will ask themselves a few questions, such as: Who will continue the sound, steady progress being made by the economy after saving it from the brink of a complete collapse? Who will continue to effectively use skilled diplomacy and the pressure of America's strength and influence to work with allies and the international community when dealing with world affairs? Who will continue to responsibly lead our country based on a respect for God, the rights and human dignity of all people and the protection of the health of our planet?
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | September 6, 1992
A woman I know named Linda is deeply concerned about world affairs. Often, when a major development occurs, Linda will phone my wife to break the news.continue to be obsessed with them in molecular detail. Although all fairness, I should point out that I made up the part at the beginning about Charles' waxing his legs. He was waxing Prince Andrew's legs. Linda, call Beth.
NEWS
November 3, 2012
Before voting for president next week, I hope intelligent people will ask themselves a few questions, such as: Who will continue the sound, steady progress being made by the economy after saving it from the brink of a complete collapse? Who will continue to effectively use skilled diplomacy and the pressure of America's strength and influence to work with allies and the international community when dealing with world affairs? Who will continue to responsibly lead our country based on a respect for God, the rights and human dignity of all people and the protection of the health of our planet?
NEWS
January 20, 1991
At the precise midpoint of his White House term, George Bush is where he wants to be in defining his presidency. He is commander-in-chief, protector and architect of his nation's destiny in world affairs, the ultimate internationalist working with foreign leaders in running to ground the kind of despot he learned to loathe at an early age.The firmness of purpose he brings to the war against Iraq's Saddam Hussein may, in the end, be his greatest asset --...
NEWS
November 10, 1991
After a year of extraordinary triumphs in world affairs, President Bush is returning from the NATO summit to an economy in the doldrums, angry fellow citizens and his re-election suddenly in doubt. What a turnabout! His victory in the Persian Gulf war, his diplomacy in arranging a Middle East peace conference, his initiatives to lower the nuclear threat, his steady assumption of world leadership -- all these achievements fade in the harsh glare of recession politics.Just ten months ago, Democrats seemed to have squandered whatever chances they had in 1992 by opposing the use of force against Iraq.
NEWS
March 24, 2007
Maryland's Board of Public Works has approved $264,500 for lighting improvements at the General John Stricker Middle School Recreation Center in Dundalk as part of the state's Project Open Space program. The project was among $1.49 million in Open Space program funding approved at the Wednesday meeting of the board, which is composed of Gov. Martin O'Malley, Comptroller Peter Franchot and Treasurer Nancy Kopp. Baltimore County is also seeking $850,000 through bond bills for improvements to light and modernize fields at Stricker and two other schools, said Ellen Kobler, a county spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 9, 2012
Watching the Olympic Games, I find one phenomenon particularly striking. After an event, athletes who literally seconds before had been attempting to trounce one another in competition suddenly start hugging each other. An outsider might wonder about this coexistence of competition and affection. As a former elite-level swimmer, I can tell you: While it's every athlete's goal to win, athletes realize that their competitors are largely responsible for pushing them to their best performances.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 9, 2012
Watching the Olympic Games, I find one phenomenon particularly striking. After an event, athletes who literally seconds before had been attempting to trounce one another in competition suddenly start hugging each other. An outsider might wonder about this coexistence of competition and affection. As a former elite-level swimmer, I can tell you: While it's every athlete's goal to win, athletes realize that their competitors are largely responsible for pushing them to their best performances.
NEWS
By Willilam S. Reese | March 8, 2012
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently delivered a speech in Tunisia that focused on the historic role young people are playing to promote freedom, opportunity and human dignity in their countries. Speaking at a youth forum in Tunis, she also took questions from the youth leaders, students and young entrepreneurs who had packed the room to hear what she had to say. Secretary Clinton's powerful message, that "the needs and concerns of young people have been marginalized too long," was also aimed at a global audience.
NEWS
By James M. Lindsay | December 17, 2009
As President Barack Obama moves ahead with his plan to send more U.S. troops to Afghanistan, his overall approach to foreign policy looks to be losing favor with the American public. Mr. Obama campaigned on a pledge to renew American global leadership by emphasizing diplomacy and working with other countries to solve common problems. However, Americans today are less convinced of the need for U.S. leadership and the wisdom of multilateralism. That, at least, is the conclusion that emerges from a new poll of public opinion conducted by the Pew Research Center and the Council on Foreign Relations.
NEWS
March 24, 2007
Maryland's Board of Public Works has approved $264,500 for lighting improvements at the General John Stricker Middle School Recreation Center in Dundalk as part of the state's Project Open Space program. The project was among $1.49 million in Open Space program funding approved at the Wednesday meeting of the board, which is composed of Gov. Martin O'Malley, Comptroller Peter Franchot and Treasurer Nancy Kopp. Baltimore County is also seeking $850,000 through bond bills for improvements to light and modernize fields at Stricker and two other schools, said Ellen Kobler, a county spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 4, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Although voters might not know it from the campaign so far, the next president will face issues beyond tax cuts, health insurance and Bob Jones University. Global terrorism, for example. A swelling trade deficit. A brooding, strengthening China. A desperate Russia. An unstable, war-torn Africa. Yet in keeping with other post-Cold War presidential campaigns, foreign policy has been largely blotted out by domestic issues in the election of 2000. While all four leading candidates "are hovered around the center" on foreign policy, according to James Goldgeier, a professor at George Washington University, their positions differ enough to have generated a vigorous debate.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1999
William H. Keeler, archbishop of Baltimore, one of seven U.S. cardinals, trusted adviser to Pope John Paul II and an internationally respected leader in interfaith dialogue, begins each weekday much like any parish priest. As most of the city awakes, Keeler stands behind the altar of the Roman Catholic Basilica of the Assumption in downtown Baltimore, celebrating the daily Mass for anyone who enters: workers stopping before going to the office, members of his staff and the occasional homeless person wandering in from the weather.
NEWS
March 13, 1993
Of all the leaders of the seven largest industrial democracies, President Clinton is the only one who is politically secure at home. The rest are in such deep trouble that their ability to contribute to world stability is seriously at risk. The Group of Seven, once a proud organization capable of dealing with global economic problems, is on a losing streak of four years of failure in world trade reform and three years of fumbling on aid to Russia.Look at the sorry lineup: France's Francois Mitterrand, facing a setback for his Socialist Party in parliamentary elections later this month; Germany's Helmut Kohl, on the defensive before an extremist right-wing surge; Britain's John Major, sinking in opinion polls as his nation's economy sinks; Japan's Kiichi Miyazawa, beset by horrific scandals in his Liberal Democratic Party; Italy's Giuliano Amato, leader of a four-party coalition teetering from its connection to mob-associated corruption; Canada's Brian Mulroney, already on his way out in a bid to save his Conservative Party.
NEWS
By James Reston | November 29, 1991
Washington -- WITH THE Cold War over and with fears of another Pearl Harbor at rest, it's hard to remember a Thanksgiving weekend when there were more reasons for the U.S. to give thanks than in this second year of the last decade of the century. But somehow there is little rejoicing. We seem to be at peace with everybody but ourselves.How could this be? For 50 years since the invention of atomic weapons, we have lived in fear of a third world war. In the first two world wars, 70 million people were killed.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- For Strobe Talbott, who has spent the past six weeks shuttling from Washington to Moscow and European capitals trying to end the Kosovo war, more is at stake in his mission than peace in the Balkans.Since his old friend Bill Clinton tapped him as an adviser on the former Soviet Union in 1993, Talbott has been a consistent -- and at times lonely -- proponent of the idea that Russia can be a responsible U.S. partner in world affairs.Now, with Serbian troops poised to pull out of Kosovo after 11 weeks of NATO airstrikes, Talbott's idea is gaining renewed respect.
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