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By Ellen Handler Spitz and Ellen Handler Spitz,Special to the Sun | October 21, 2001
Seeing art is at its best a private and mysterious affair -- read about it later. Why should we bother to read anything about art? Why not simply experience it for ourselves? Why not rely on our own clear eyes to discover its pleasures? Why depend on someone else to extract its meanings for us? But we do. We wrap up works of art in wads of wordy gauze, stick them with labels, gird them with explanatory texts, smother them in narrative, subordinate them to academic disquisitions, brochures, artists' statements, catalogue essays and critical tomes.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Glen Burnie High School art teacher Allison Butler recalled once winning a Kindle during a teacher development session, and last year she secured a $500 grant to purchase cameras for her class. That was the extent of her prize earnings before Wednesday, when she sat before students, faculty and Anne Arundel school officials to receive a $2,000 grant as part of a national Unsung Heroes Awards Competition sponsored by the company ING. Actually, make that a $27,000 grant. Butler sat stunned, then burst into tears when company officials announced that, in addition to the $2,000 grant, she also won the overall 2013 Unsung Heroes $25,000 first-place award, beating out 1,300 applicants nationwide.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
Jim McFarland sees beauty in the ordinary.A mound of dirt with brown grass, a mountain pass on an overcast day or a wasp's nest on a post become ideas for compelling sculptures.They have simple names like "Nest" (1994), "Watch" (1991) and "Perch" (1991). They're made of such materials as concrete, metal, rocks, bamboo and wood."I think of myself as a constructionist sculptor. . . . I put pieces of material together to form artworks," says the bearded sculptor, who is an art instructor at Harford Community College.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Dignity Players' current production of "Art" is a near-flawless effort - a must-see work for everyone who values friendship and realizes what art contributes to life. Yasmina Reza's 1998 Tony Award-winning play depicts how our perception of and reaction to art can test friendships and opinions, yet shows how we can learn from one another in confrontational situations. Dignity's production raises the standard of excellence for acting in local theater, as three actors portray characters who are confident, threatened and pacifistic.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | May 26, 1995
That huge sigh of relief you may have heard recently came from the art world.Following a depressed period, the sales and values of high-quality artwork have suddenly picked up in 1995.It's not really a boom because it doesn't yet cover all segments of the art market. However, prospects are promising for the first time since a price collapse four years ago prompted by the flight of Japanese speculators.More than $270 million in impressionist, modern and contemporary art were sold at recent Sotheby's and Christie's auctions in New York City.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | February 7, 1996
NEW YORK -- Three works of art worth $15 million, including two Picassos, that were stolen from John F. Kennedy Airport were recovered late yesterday and law enforcement sources said an arrest "was imminent."The sources declined to reveal details pending a news conference today. Port Authority detectives, FBI agents and investigators from the U.S. Customs Service were all involved. Earlier yesterday, a special agent in charge of investigations at the airport for the U.S. Customs Service, Thomas Smith, said the investigation was focusing on airport employees.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | February 11, 2007
Trapped in a life-and-death struggle, a huge African elephant cast in bronze rises on its haunches as hunters perched on its back slash with swords and spears at two powerful tigers that are attacking their party. UNTAMED: THE ART OF ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE / / Through May 6 / / The Walters Art Museum / / 410-547-9000 or thewalters.org
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 16, 2009
The men and women featured in Harrod Blank's Automorphosi s, driving cars that look straight out of some avant-garde artist's imagination, must be the happiest, quirkiest, most approachable bunch of exhibitionists ever. Several of them will be at Artscape this weekend to prove it. Blank's documentary, which gets a free screening at the American Visionary Art Museum today, features scores of art cars, automobiles adorned, adapted and otherwise added-to by artists holding to no rules but their own (and maybe just a few having to do with traffic safety)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 16, 1992
Jerry Sherman gets excited about art. He can talk about it for hours at a time. He sometimes gets so excited it's counterproductive.One of his favorite artists is the Italian Mimmo Paladino, and recently at a Chicago art fair he saw a 1989 collage called "Cherubini" by Paladino. "I thought it was fabulous. I went wild. I jumped all over the place like a kid in a candy store. I thought later the price probably went up $5,000 then and there." He bought it subsequently from the same dealer at an art fair in Basel, Switzerland, "after crazy types of negotiations," and it became the fifth Paladino in his collection.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2005
The young girl's gaze seems to teeter on the verge of emotion, like a summer afternoon that might suddenly erupt in thunder. It's a face that haunts artist Shane McCallum so much that he's already painted it five times. "I think her appeal is based on the honesty of the innocent, or perhaps the neutral," he writes in his artist's statement. "The longer I look, the more I imagine. ... What will be her next expression? A smile? A grimace? Will she pardon or condemn?" The 47-year-old artist writes, and paints, from his cell at the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Next Saturday, the Baker family home will be full of light. On the first night of Hanukkah, the Bakers - Liz, Steve, and 7-year-old Matthew - will celebrate by lighting several menorahs in their home and in the Hampden studio where Steve Baker creates artwork, including menorahs, out of glass. "My son will light one," says Liz Baker. "I'll light one, and we'll walk down to my husband's studio, where Steve keeps menorahs in the window, and we'll light them as well. " Like many members of the Baltimore Jewish community, the Bakers have amassed a small collection of menorahs that's growing over time.
NEWS
February 5, 2011
Google, the giant Internet search engine, wants to put the world's great art museums and their artworks online. This week, the company announced the launch of its Google Art Project, which presents virtual tours of 17 of the world's most prominent museums using the "street view" technology developed for its online maps. Not only can site visitors stroll through the galleries of New York's Museum of Modern Art, Amsterdam's Van Gogh Museum, London's National Gallery or the Uffizi in Florence, they can also call up high-resolution images that display selected works in such minute detail that every brush stroke, scrape mark and paint dab of the artist's hand leaps out at you. You'd need a magnifying glass to see the nuts and bolts of the painter's art so clearly on a work hung on the walls of a museum — if the guards let you get close enough to try. But, of course, they never would.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Paul Weller is seated beside his work, colorful fused-glass art pieces that display his feel for texture and design. They're the kinds of pieces that would rival any church's stained glass and are a testament to the talents of a man born with physical and mental challenges. Weller hopes that his artwork can help others with similar challenges. Jean Weller has enrolled her son in an entrepreneurship program at Howard Community College to assist him in forming a nonprofit that offers financial assistance to help the disabled enroll in creative arts programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Abdi Farah enjoys being the sole survivor. When Bravo's "Work of Art" premiered June 9, two men and one woman with Baltimore connections were among the 14 artists competing for the show's grand prize of $100,000 and an exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. In the weeks since, however, Jaclyn Santos and John Parot, both of whom studied at the Maryland Institute College of Art , have packed their easels and gone home. With the contestants whittled down to three and the final competition set to air Wednesday, only Farah remains.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2010
Stephanie and Jerry Weiss are such prolific world travelers — they even lived abroad for a time — that when it came time to consider a place to spend retirement, they were in a quandary. "We looked in Panama, Costa Rica, Italy, Holland, Florida [and] we couldn't make up our minds," said Stephanie Weiss, a 70-year old retired art teacher. "'For all of our looking, nothing fit the bill." It was soon after an extended stay in the historic international arts town of San Miguel de Allende in Mexico, that the couple happened upon a spacious corner residence in the Charlestown retirement community, where Jerry Weiss, 80, a retired Protestant minister, had many friends who were also retired clergymen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 16, 2009
The men and women featured in Harrod Blank's Automorphosi s, driving cars that look straight out of some avant-garde artist's imagination, must be the happiest, quirkiest, most approachable bunch of exhibitionists ever. Several of them will be at Artscape this weekend to prove it. Blank's documentary, which gets a free screening at the American Visionary Art Museum today, features scores of art cars, automobiles adorned, adapted and otherwise added-to by artists holding to no rules but their own (and maybe just a few having to do with traffic safety)
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2003
Richard Rist often asks visitors whether they feel as if they're in the city when offering tours of his 1 1/4 -acre back yard of old and exquisite landscaping. In the Hamilton area of Northeast Baltimore, the former owners of Rist's home nurtured boxwood, magnolia trees and holly bushes bursting with bright red berries. The expansive front lawn is dressed in old trees but sports a major man-made addition: a life-size bronze sculpture of a year-old horse. "This is The Yearling by P.J. Mene," says Richard Rist, 42, who owns a software company and works out of his home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | October 14, 2001
Although its collection enjoys a stellar reputation, the Walters Art Museum hasn't always presented it as well as it should. Its largest building was a maze of disorienting spaces, plagued with mechanical defects. Galleries were filled with priceless art, but visitors largely had to make sense of it on their own. Many left without ever doing so. After seven years of design and construction, the Walters finally has a physical plant worthy of the collection it houses. That's the lasting achievement of the $24 million renovation and reconfiguration of the 1974 Centre Street Building, which reopens Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts | March 19, 2009
Baltimore's Contemporary Museum at 100 W. Centre St. will be transformed into an environmental think tank and laboratory when the Futurefarmers art collective from San Francisco opens The Reverse Ark: In the Wake, an exhibit exploring the social, historical and environmental history of the city's mills and textile industry, running March 26 to Aug. 22. Using the concept of an "ark" as a place of preservation and exploration, Futurefarmers will work with...
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | March 7, 2009
The state budget crunch hit the arts hard this year, especially in Baltimore, where four of the state's largest arts institutions are located. Officials at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Walters Art Museum and Center Stage are struggling with a triple whammy of double-digit declines in endowment income, falling ticket sales and a 36 percent cut in funding for the state arts council, which supports arts groups across...
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