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By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2004
This is the time of year that city workers and motorists alike experience a rash of headaches - but not the kind requiring aspirin and some rest. Instead, they deal with water main breaks, often prompted by aging pipes and extremely cold temperatures. As of yesterday, city Department of Public Works crews were battling about 40 water main breaks, some trickier than others, said spokesman Kurt Kocher. That's not a particularly daunting number, especially given the recent frigid weather, but the breaks disrupt traffic and force workers to spend hours in the cold repairing them.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Mary B. "Wesi" Price, a social worker who helped establish the social work department at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died Saturday of dementia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at the Maples of Towson, an assisted-living facility. She was 88. She was born Mary Louise Baldwin into a prominent Baltimore County political family. Her father, H. Streett Baldwin, entered politics in 1928, "spurred by his disgust at the anti-Catholic venom directed against presidential candidate Al Smith," said Mrs. Price's daughter Barbara Percival of Washington.
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NEWS
January 13, 1997
WITH THE appearance last week of the first snowflakes of 1997, your Intrepidness resumed a fascination with the bunker mentality that invades all levels of the local scene. Witness a Wednesday evening run on a Northeast Baltimore grocery store where a frantic shopper piled her cart high with paper goods, junk food and an awesome four dozen eggs.The mood was also hyper Thursday at the city's Department of Public Works, where director George G. Balog was trying to atone for criticism of lax cleanup heaped on him and his crews after the mighty blizzard last year.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Two of the city's top three elected officials are criticizing what they believe is an over-reliance on consultants within city government. Both City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Comptroller Joan M. Pratt voted against a $27 million on-call consulting agreement with three firms and the city's Department of Public Works. The city's Board of Estimates, which is controlled by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, approved the deal by a 3-2 vote Wednesday.  "It appears that the city is continuing to outsource," Pratt said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 23, 1997
Baltimore public works officials this week released compromise guidelines for mountain biking on lands that border the city's reservoirs.The guidelines were developed by a task force made up of representatives of mountain bikers, the Public Works Department and environmentalists. A ban on the sport had been proposed because of concern that it damaged lands bordering the reservoirs.Under the guidelines, mountain biking will be limited to Woods Roads Biking Routes at the Loch Raven, Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs; the biking trails will be closed for 48 hours after a soaking rain; and signs will be placed to clearly mark trails.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
Health warnings against fishing or swimming are in effect for a stretch of the Wicomico River south of Salisbury after a sewage spill Aug. 10. An estimated 300,000-400,000 gallons of raw sewage poured into the river when a pumping station lost power during a heavy rainstorm, causing wastewater to overflow, said officials for the Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment. Sewage flowed into the river for about four hours until power was restored, according to a Salisbury Public Works Department report to the MDE. The Wicomico County Health Department has posted signs advising people not to swim or fish in the river from the treatment plant to the Green Hill Yacht Club, about six miles downstream from city limits.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson | February 7, 2008
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon named David E. Scott the city's new public works director yesterday. Scott, 47, public works commissioner in Atlanta, will replace George L. Winfield, who died late last year. Scott is to arrive in Baltimore in March. His appointment is expected to be voted on by the City Council at a hearing that has not been scheduled. "I look forward to joining the City Hall staff and the Dixon administration," Scott said after the mayor's announcement of his appointment at the weekly Board of Estimates meeting.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | November 2, 1990
Annapolis Public Works Director William Campbell will retire at the end of the year -- for the third time.Campbell, 69, has worked for the city for six years, the last four as head of public works. In a letter to Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins this week, Campbell said the job was one of the most enjoyable of his 46-year career.He said much the same in an interview yesterday."It's been an extremely enjoyable and rewarding tour of duty, and I attribute that to the city itself," Campbell said. "I've had good luck with the administrations and the councils I've worked for, and the troops have been pretty great."
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
An Anne Arundel County employee has been disciplined for giving confidential government information to businesses for whom he also was working, according to a consent order signed this week. The commission also found that John C. George III of the Public Works department and his non-government employers benefited financially from their arrangement. George, a geographical information systems technician for the Bureau of Engineering, worked for years for outside employers and made drawings for them that they submitted to other county departments for review and approval, according to the order.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 6, 2000
Over the objections of Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge, the three-member Board of County Commissioners yesterday forced the resignation of Carroll's Public Works director. J. Michael Evans, 57, resigned about 2:30 p.m. after a closed-door meeting with the board. He had been a county employee for 12 years and commanded a staff of 170. Public Works is the largest department in Carroll government. Neither Evans nor the commissioners would comment on their discussions, and Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Robin Bartlett Frazier refused to say why they asked for Evans' resignation.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
A Baltimore-based contracting company overbilled the city's Department of Public Works $26,492 last year, according to a report released by the city's inspector general Thursday. According to Baltimore Inspector General David McClintock, EBA Engineering billed the city between March and July of last year for 313 hours of labor that it did not provide. The company had been hired to do design and engineering work to improve the city's sewer system. Nanda Sen, president of EBA Engineering, acknowledged Thursday that his company had indeed overbilled the city and said the problem was caused by a computer coding error.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Overnight Tuesday, a wormlike apparatus with green plastic tentacles sending out electromagnetic waves was to wind its way through nearly six miles of a Baltimore water main, detecting potential trouble areas along the pipe. "This is better for pipes that can't be taken out of service" for manual checks, said Travis Wagner, a civil engineer with Pure Technologies, a company with offices in Columbia that owns the tool, called the PipeDiver. The device is being used to inspect the Southwest Transmission Main, a stretch of pipe that is more than four feet in diameter and runs from the Ashburton Water Filtration Plant in Northwest Baltimore into Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
The city of Annapolis has cut its overtime spending by nearly half in the first month of the new fiscal year, city officials announced. Overtime spending in July was 48 percent under budget. Of the $149,340 budgeted for overtime in July, city departments spent $77,050. Mayor Joshua J. Cohen pointed to the spending decrease as evidence of his management skills. Facing an unprecedented budget crisis, Cohen created a task force earlier this year to reduce overtime expenditures. "We are fostering a new culture of accountability at City Hall, and July's overtime numbers are a promising indicator of this administration's ability to manage within the new budget," said Cohen in a statement.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson | February 7, 2008
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon named David E. Scott the city's new public works director yesterday. Scott, 47, public works commissioner in Atlanta, will replace George L. Winfield, who died late last year. Scott is to arrive in Baltimore in March. His appointment is expected to be voted on by the City Council at a hearing that has not been scheduled. "I look forward to joining the City Hall staff and the Dixon administration," Scott said after the mayor's announcement of his appointment at the weekly Board of Estimates meeting.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | December 3, 2007
George L. Winfield, director of Baltimore's Department of Public Works and a veteran city employee who developed a reputation as a quiet, steady worker, died Saturday after suffering a stroke about three weeks ago. He was 64 and lived in Baltimore. Mr. Winfield, who served under five mayors in a career at City Hall that spanned three decades, led the city's largest department through deep budget cuts, droughts, massive snowstorms and a multimillion-dollar effort to upgrade its century-old sewer system.
NEWS
May 6, 2007
Work on a project to widen Great Star Drive at Route 108 in Clarksville is expected to begin this week, the Howard County Public Works Department said. A third lane will be added at Great Star Drive to help relieve congestion at the intersection. The project is expected to take about two months to complete. Great Star Drive will be open during the construction, but the right lane might be closed during non-rush-hour times. Signs will be posted. "The Department of Public Works understands that this project will inconvenience the driving public, but we ask them to bear with us while we widen Great Star Drive to ease the daily flow of traffic for the future," said James M. Irvin, public works director.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
City workers have ticketed the campaign of Democratic mayoral candidate Andrey Bundley 79 times for raising illegal signs, but cited Mayor Martin O'Malley only twice, prompting accusations of politically motivated enforcement. Officials say the city hands out citations - which carry fines of at least $100 each - based solely on the law. They point to a large number of Bundley stickers posted improperly on public utility poles. "It doesn't matter who it is. If a candidate or somebody else has an illegal sign up, the enforcement officers will write them up and take the signs down," said Kurt Kocher, Public Works Department spokesman.
NEWS
May 6, 2007
Work on a project to widen Great Star Drive at Route 108 in Clarksville is expected to begin this week, the Howard County Public Works Department said. A third lane will be added at Great Star Drive to help relieve congestion at the intersection. The project is expected to take about two months to complete. Great Star Drive will be open during the construction, but the right lane might be closed during non-rush-hour times. Signs will be posted. "The Department of Public Works understands that this project will inconvenience the driving public, but we ask them to bear with us while we widen Great Star Drive to ease the daily flow of traffic for the future," said James M. Irvin, public works director.
NEWS
September 11, 2005
County job fair set for Sept. 30; centers offer help Sixty companies are slated to attend the 17th annual Harford County Job Fair, to be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sept. 30 in the Richlin Ballroom in Edgewood. Organizations representing construction, business, health sciences, information technology, manufacturing, distribution and government have registered to participate. Some available positions may require a security clearance. County residents seeking employment, and those commuting out of the county, will have an opportunity to meet business representatives and share resumes.
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