Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWorkplace Violence
IN THE NEWS

Workplace Violence

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 22, 2010
"How does this happen to an educator on state property?" a Baltimore County legislator was quoted as asking about Hannah Wheeler, Maryland's latest victim of workplace violence ("Cheltenham death inquiry involves teen," Feb. 20). The data on workplace violence, which is defined as being threatened or assaulted while at work, are crystal clear. Compared to those in other occupations, social services workers, including teachers of troubled youth and with those who work in professions such as mental health and health care, are disproportionately hurt by violence and assault from their students or patients.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The panels on the stand-up display feature the words of a dozen women who survived domestic violence, telling why they stayed and how they left. Growing out of a larger effort to tackle domestic abuse - or intimate partner violence - as an issue affecting health and safety in the workplace, Kaiser Permanente sends the display, featuring the stories of its employees, around to its medical centers. The project aims to "to open up a conversation, to let employees and members know they're not the only one who may be experiencing domestic violence," said Ann Jordan, program manager for women's health at Kaiser, which offers domestic violence prevention programs to employees, including on-site services, referrals to community services such as shelters and training to recognize signs of abuse.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 25, 2010
We agree with workplace researchers Kathleen M. McPhaul, Jane Lipscomb and Matthew London and George Myers of the Maryland Professional Employees Council (Readers respond, Feb. 22 and Feb. 23) that we must do all we can to prevent workplace violence wherever it occurs. This is why Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), in conjunction with federal agencies, has been proactive in assessing risks at public agencies and assisting them in developing prevention programs. While we cannot discuss MOSH's ongoing investigation of the homicide that occurred on the grounds of the Cheltenham youth detention center, we are fully aware of the significant risk of job-related violence faced by health care and social service workers.
NEWS
By Jane Lipscomb | April 25, 2013
Workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard in hospitals and other health care facilities, a fact that has escaped an unsuspecting public. Nationally, nursing assistants employed by nursing homes have the highest incidence of workplace assault among all workers, according to federal data. For women who work in nursing homes, social services and hospitals, the likelihood of being harmed on the job is like that of women working the late-night shift in convenience stores. To draw attention to these and other hidden risks, the Alliance Against Workplace Violence has designated April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
A former employee at a Baltimore County automotive repair shop lurked nearby in the days after his firing last year, watching the comings and goings from across the street. Employees feared that he was plotting revenge. What the ex-employee didn't know was that he, too, was being watched. Philip Deming, a consultant in workplace violence prevention, had set up a "counter surveillance" operation. Deming had been called by the small company's president to intervene after spotting the man outside and being told by employees that he had been out there for days.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Bernice Troy, a geriatric nursing assistant in Baltimore for the past 20 years, has been spat on and cursed, scratched and punched on the job. A patient once slammed Jo Samrow, a nurse in Southern Maryland, into a wall so violently that she developed a large hematoma on the back of her head. In recent weeks, these nurses and other health care workers have shared their stories before lawmakers in Annapolis with one goal in mind — reducing assaults in Maryland health care facilities.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1994
The workplace used to be considered a safe fortress, protected from the violent crime of the streets.No longer, as daily headlines show.Early this week an angry ex-airman in Spokane, Wash., shot the psychiatrist who recommended his discharge and killed at least three bystanders.And locally, a real estate agent was shot last December by a purported customer. A few months earlier, a PHH FleetAmerica employee was killed by a fellow worker who was distraught over the breakup of their romance.
NEWS
By Jane Lipscomb | April 25, 2013
Workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard in hospitals and other health care facilities, a fact that has escaped an unsuspecting public. Nationally, nursing assistants employed by nursing homes have the highest incidence of workplace assault among all workers, according to federal data. For women who work in nursing homes, social services and hospitals, the likelihood of being harmed on the job is like that of women working the late-night shift in convenience stores. To draw attention to these and other hidden risks, the Alliance Against Workplace Violence has designated April as Workplace Violence Awareness Month.
NEWS
August 24, 2010
The report from Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), this state's workplace safety enforcement agency, cites the Department of Juvenile Services for five serious safety violations in the aftermath of Ms. Hannah Wheeling's murder at the hand of one of her students ("Employees broke safety protocol the day teacher was killed," Aug. 21). Yet the recommendations to DJS might as well be stamped "Keep Up Business as Usual". The MOSH report cites the Department of Juvenile Services' existing safety protocols as sufficient to prevent future homicides of staff by residents when they are followed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Legislation to strengthen violence prevention standards at health care facilities across the state has been withdrawn in the Senate - ending its chances for passage in Annapolis this session. Sen. Katherine Klausmeier, a Baltimore County Democrat and the bill's sponsor, said she submitted a withdrawal letter to the finance committee Monday after stakeholders representing nursing homes and assisted living facilities expressed concerns that it would not leave room for individualized approaches to dealing with violence in varying clinical environments.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Legislation to strengthen violence prevention standards at health care facilities across the state has been withdrawn in the Senate - ending its chances for passage in Annapolis this session. Sen. Katherine Klausmeier, a Baltimore County Democrat and the bill's sponsor, said she submitted a withdrawal letter to the finance committee Monday after stakeholders representing nursing homes and assisted living facilities expressed concerns that it would not leave room for individualized approaches to dealing with violence in varying clinical environments.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Bernice Troy, a geriatric nursing assistant in Baltimore for the past 20 years, has been spat on and cursed, scratched and punched on the job. A patient once slammed Jo Samrow, a nurse in Southern Maryland, into a wall so violently that she developed a large hematoma on the back of her head. In recent weeks, these nurses and other health care workers have shared their stories before lawmakers in Annapolis with one goal in mind — reducing assaults in Maryland health care facilities.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | November 4, 2012
My initial impression of the murderous attack on our consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was probably similar to yours. A horrific incident. A security failure. Another example of radical Islamic overreaction to the most tepid of incidents - in this case, an amateurish, offensive video about Islam. I believed Ambassador Susan Rice as she peddled the video story during her Sunday TV appearances on Sept. 16. I believed Secretary of State Hillary Clinton as she repeatedly cited the video as the incendiary element behind the "spontaneous demonstration," going so far as to condemn the video on a paid ad broadcast to the Muslim world.
NEWS
By Bonnita Spikes | April 12, 2011
This is National Crime Victims' Rights Week -- a time for the nation and our state to ask about the meaning of justice, both present and future, for those harmed by crime. Our theme this year, "Reshaping the Future, Honoring the Past," calls on us to not only reflect, but also to act. Our first duty is to never forget the impact of crime. I am a crime victim. My husband, Michael, was murdered in a convenience store robbery in 1994. I was left to raise our four boys on my own. I'm happy to report that they have all become wonderful, productive adult men despite what they lost that day. But, even now, the anniversary of that day can bring us to our knees.
NEWS
August 24, 2010
The report from Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), this state's workplace safety enforcement agency, cites the Department of Juvenile Services for five serious safety violations in the aftermath of Ms. Hannah Wheeling's murder at the hand of one of her students ("Employees broke safety protocol the day teacher was killed," Aug. 21). Yet the recommendations to DJS might as well be stamped "Keep Up Business as Usual". The MOSH report cites the Department of Juvenile Services' existing safety protocols as sufficient to prevent future homicides of staff by residents when they are followed.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
A former employee at a Baltimore County automotive repair shop lurked nearby in the days after his firing last year, watching the comings and goings from across the street. Employees feared that he was plotting revenge. What the ex-employee didn't know was that he, too, was being watched. Philip Deming, a consultant in workplace violence prevention, had set up a "counter surveillance" operation. Deming had been called by the small company's president to intervene after spotting the man outside and being told by employees that he had been out there for days.
NEWS
February 25, 2010
We agree with workplace researchers Kathleen M. McPhaul, Jane Lipscomb and Matthew London and George Myers of the Maryland Professional Employees Council (Readers respond, Feb. 22 and Feb. 23) that we must do all we can to prevent workplace violence wherever it occurs. This is why Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), in conjunction with federal agencies, has been proactive in assessing risks at public agencies and assisting them in developing prevention programs. While we cannot discuss MOSH's ongoing investigation of the homicide that occurred on the grounds of the Cheltenham youth detention center, we are fully aware of the significant risk of job-related violence faced by health care and social service workers.
NEWS
February 23, 2010
The brutal murder of Hannah Wheeling, a teacher and counselor at the Cheltenham Youth Facility, is a very real tragedy, for her family, her co-workers, her students and clients, and for our entire community. It is a loss that deeply disturbs us as a union of professionals in state government because Ms. Wheeling's violent death occurred at her workplace. Hannah Wheeling was a dedicated teacher and public servant. According to co-workers and family, she worked long hours on lesson plans.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.