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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff gHB | September 26, 1991
Enforcing workplace safety standards is expected to become more complicated and expensive in the coming months as fines for violations increase sevenfold and new regulations are issued covering risks such as motor vehicle accidents and AIDS, state experts say.Labor lawyers from the Baltimore firm of Shaw & Rosenthal and representatives from state and federal enforcement agencies told about 120 employers at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce seminar yesterday that...
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Legislation to strengthen violence prevention standards at health care facilities across the state has been withdrawn in the Senate - ending its chances for passage in Annapolis this session. Sen. Katherine Klausmeier, a Baltimore County Democrat and the bill's sponsor, said she submitted a withdrawal letter to the finance committee Monday after stakeholders representing nursing homes and assisted living facilities expressed concerns that it would not leave room for individualized approaches to dealing with violence in varying clinical environments.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2003
The Bush administration is to announce today policy changes that it says will give the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration more power to crack down on companies that persistently flout workplace safety rules. Under the new policies, OSHA officials will be directed to conduct more follow-up inspections of companies that commit safety violations of "the highest severity," according to a memorandum obtained by The New York Times. Companies that fail to correct violations will in some cases find themselves facing contempt-of-court orders from federal judges to force action.
NEWS
May 31, 2009
New stores at Arundel Mills Two new stores have opened at Arundel Mills, Timberland and Aldo. Timberland features outdoor apparel for all ages, while Aldo offers fashion footwear, leather goods and accessories. Rue 21, a trendy fashion shop, and Cyberion Ave, an accessory store for cell phones, iPods, MP3s and other electronics, have both reopened in new locations. Candy World has also moved to a new location in the mall. Call 410-540-5111 for more information. Tourism sales director The Annapolis & Anne Arundel County Conference and Visitors Bureau has hired Bill Adams as director of the sales department.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | December 26, 2007
Morris Lasover, an attorney of 47 years who until two weeks before his death continued to champion workplace safety, died of heart failure Saturday at Sinai Hospital. The Baltimore native was 84. Born in 1923, Mr. Lasover attended high school at City College, where he was on the basketball and track teams. After he graduated in 1941, he went on to work at the Bethlehem Steel shipyard, helping build ships for the Navy. In 1944, Mr. Lasover joined the Navy and spent two years in Jacksonville, Fla., training to be in a rescue squad.
NEWS
May 31, 2009
New stores at Arundel Mills Two new stores have opened at Arundel Mills, Timberland and Aldo. Timberland features outdoor apparel for all ages, while Aldo offers fashion footwear, leather goods and accessories. Rue 21, a trendy fashion shop, and Cyberion Ave, an accessory store for cell phones, iPods, MP3s and other electronics, have both reopened in new locations. Candy World has also moved to a new location in the mall. Call 410-540-5111 for more information. Tourism sales director The Annapolis & Anne Arundel County Conference and Visitors Bureau has hired Bill Adams as director of the sales department.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2002
Baltimore officials have hooked up showers and are close to hiring a laundry service for sewer workers, who have been concerned about taking germs home with them on their uniforms and skin. The steps come six months after workers filed a union grievance, complaining that a lack of showers and laundry service posed a health risk for them and their families. "This is one of those instances that the right thing was done," said Duane Baysmore, who represents water and wastewater workers for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME)
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
A 48-year-old Silver Spring man was rescued last night after being trapped for eight hours in a 14-foot-deep trench that collapsed on him in southern Howard County.Frank Giddings appeared unhurt when he was pulled from the trench about 7:30 p.m. He was flown by MedEvac helicopter to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore for tests and observation.Rescue workers, called to the accident scene at a house in the 9000 block of Dumhart Road about 11:30 a.m., found Mr. Giddings buried up to his shoulders in dirt in the caved-in trench.
NEWS
May 31, 1994
The $7.5 million fine assessed last month against the Dayton Tire plant in Oklahoma City for dangerous working conditions that killed one employee and injured two others won't make a dent in the earnings of the Japanese owner, Bridgestone Corp. It also hasn't made a dent in the firm's callous view of worker safety; the U.S. Labor Department says the cited violations continue.That is why the government sought a court order for "imminent danger" to force the Oklahoma plant to follow safety rules or restrict operations, a restraining order that stayed in force only one day. While the lengthy appeals process continues, the 1,600-worker plant is operating as usual.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Legislation to strengthen violence prevention standards at health care facilities across the state has been withdrawn in the Senate - ending its chances for passage in Annapolis this session. Sen. Katherine Klausmeier, a Baltimore County Democrat and the bill's sponsor, said she submitted a withdrawal letter to the finance committee Monday after stakeholders representing nursing homes and assisted living facilities expressed concerns that it would not leave room for individualized approaches to dealing with violence in varying clinical environments.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun Reporter | December 26, 2007
Morris Lasover, an attorney of 47 years who until two weeks before his death continued to champion workplace safety, died of heart failure Saturday at Sinai Hospital. The Baltimore native was 84. Born in 1923, Mr. Lasover attended high school at City College, where he was on the basketball and track teams. After he graduated in 1941, he went on to work at the Bethlehem Steel shipyard, helping build ships for the Navy. In 1944, Mr. Lasover joined the Navy and spent two years in Jacksonville, Fla., training to be in a rescue squad.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2003
The Bush administration is to announce today policy changes that it says will give the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration more power to crack down on companies that persistently flout workplace safety rules. Under the new policies, OSHA officials will be directed to conduct more follow-up inspections of companies that commit safety violations of "the highest severity," according to a memorandum obtained by The New York Times. Companies that fail to correct violations will in some cases find themselves facing contempt-of-court orders from federal judges to force action.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2002
Baltimore officials have hooked up showers and are close to hiring a laundry service for sewer workers, who have been concerned about taking germs home with them on their uniforms and skin. The steps come six months after workers filed a union grievance, complaining that a lack of showers and laundry service posed a health risk for them and their families. "This is one of those instances that the right thing was done," said Duane Baysmore, who represents water and wastewater workers for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME)
NEWS
May 31, 1994
The $7.5 million fine assessed last month against the Dayton Tire plant in Oklahoma City for dangerous working conditions that killed one employee and injured two others won't make a dent in the earnings of the Japanese owner, Bridgestone Corp. It also hasn't made a dent in the firm's callous view of worker safety; the U.S. Labor Department says the cited violations continue.That is why the government sought a court order for "imminent danger" to force the Oklahoma plant to follow safety rules or restrict operations, a restraining order that stayed in force only one day. While the lengthy appeals process continues, the 1,600-worker plant is operating as usual.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
A 48-year-old Silver Spring man was rescued last night after being trapped for eight hours in a 14-foot-deep trench that collapsed on him in southern Howard County.Frank Giddings appeared unhurt when he was pulled from the trench about 7:30 p.m. He was flown by MedEvac helicopter to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore for tests and observation.Rescue workers, called to the accident scene at a house in the 9000 block of Dumhart Road about 11:30 a.m., found Mr. Giddings buried up to his shoulders in dirt in the caved-in trench.
NEWS
September 30, 1992
Children not society's most precious assetWhat is our most precious asset? Most people would give the textbook answer: "Our children." But don't you believe it.Do your paramedics have training in pediatric care? Are your childrens' school buses equipped with seat belts? Why are are the most violent shows on TV cartoons?Summer films feature machine-gunning, car-bombing, human meltdowns, sordid Arnold exposing "family values" by killing policemen and so on. Children must be supporting these films since they are money-makers.
NEWS
September 30, 1992
Children not society's most precious assetWhat is our most precious asset? Most people would give the textbook answer: "Our children." But don't you believe it.Do your paramedics have training in pediatric care? Are your childrens' school buses equipped with seat belts? Why are are the most violent shows on TV cartoons?Summer films feature machine-gunning, car-bombing, human meltdowns, sordid Arnold exposing "family values" by killing policemen and so on. Children must be supporting these films since they are money-makers.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Staff Writer | March 21, 1992
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- "We have got to get schedules!" Jerry Brown's press aide shouted over the phone to campaign headquarters in California.Mark Nykanen was exasperated. His boss was finally attracting major media attention in the wake of Paul E. Tsongas' departure from the presidential race, but the press could not find out where the candidate would be.The incident helps illustrate the difficulties Mr. Brown's loosely organized campaign faces now that he is the only remaining Democrat challenging front-runner Bill Clinton.
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