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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
Employees at Carefirst BlueCross BlueShield, the region's largest insurer, can work from home several days a week. Hunt Valley-based McCormick & Co. lets some full-time spice plant employees work four-day weeks. And in the "flexible workplace" of Harris-Kupfer Architects in Baltimore, employees' kids can tag along to the office, where they curl up on the lounge couch to play video games on snow days. However they define it, more companies in Maryland and beyond have adopted flexible workplace policies.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The panels on the stand-up display feature the words of a dozen women who survived domestic violence, telling why they stayed and how they left. Growing out of a larger effort to tackle domestic abuse - or intimate partner violence - as an issue affecting health and safety in the workplace, Kaiser Permanente sends the display, featuring the stories of its employees, around to its medical centers. The project aims to "to open up a conversation, to let employees and members know they're not the only one who may be experiencing domestic violence," said Ann Jordan, program manager for women's health at Kaiser, which offers domestic violence prevention programs to employees, including on-site services, referrals to community services such as shelters and training to recognize signs of abuse.
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FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
As lottery promoters will tell you, you have to play to win. But when it comes to playing with other people's money, experts have another saying to keep in mind: Trust but verify. After a rash of high-profile lawsuits alleging lottery-ticket fraud among groups of coworkers, some fun-loving players are getting serious about the precautions they take to ensure fair play when it comes to pooling ticket money with colleagues. And some in the human-resources field say workplace pools should be banned outright.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
We hereby call upon the editor of The Sun op-ed page to suspend Susan Reimer two weeks for violating the rules of rational thinking ( "Ray Rice decision appears to prompt new NFL policy," Aug. 17). She is worried that the NFL "seeks to punish not only behavior that affects play on the field but behavior not even found criminal under the law. " Her first example: "Bullying in the locker room, for example. " As a former sportswriter, Ms. Reimer should know that what happens in the locker room most definitely does affect play on the field, including when it leads a bullied player to quit the team.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Weeks after Baltimore County agreed pay about $500,000 to settle a workplace discrimination suit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, a former county police lieutenant and two former firefighters have filed federal lawsuits claiming that they were illegally forced off their jobs. Each of the suits filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore demands $2.3 million in damages and compensation for violations of rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act, which bars workplace and hiring discrimination based on medical conditions.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2013
Let's say the CEO of your company is retiring, but he's going to keep an office at headquarters and the services of the same secretary as the new guy. Awkward! Or how about working at a company where the boss just decided you can no longer work from home, a godsend once you had kids, even as she brings her baby to the nursery she built for him next to her office. Meow! This past week was a veritable schadenfreude-fest for those of us who love nothing more than complaining about our work — unless it's discovering how delightfully awful someone else's office must be. So, the Vatican: On top of the usual workplace issues that must plague the Roman Catholic Church's corporate offices — there's that impenetrable glass ceiling for any women employees, for one thing — this past week brought word of a leadership transition from, um, hell.
NEWS
November 14, 1993
The Supreme Court last week struck another blow for women's rights -- but one whose impreciseness will require it to try again in the future to give employers and courts clearer guidelines as to what is illegal.The case before the court was very clear. A woman's boss at an equipment rental company in Tennessee continually made demeaning and insulting comments of a sexual nature to her in the presence of others. He expressed surprise when she told him she was offended. He apologized and promised to stop.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
A year ago, Washington marketing associate Tara Miller felt lucky just to have a job in her field. So while she wanted to work in Baltimore — where she could be closer to her boyfriend — Miller stayed put at her job in D.C. But by March of this year, she was feeling antsy. "I was poking around and ended up seeing some openings," including an account executive position at Himmelrich PR in Baltimore, Miller said. "I threw in my resume and ended up getting it," she said.
NEWS
December 16, 1993
Judged on the merits, a proposal to ban smoking in Maryland workplaces would be adopted without delay -- and without dissent. Unfortunately, when it comes to tobacco, political factors can play as big a role in policy decisions as scientific evidence.In Frederick today, the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health Advisory Board is hearing testimony in the second of two public hearings on the smoking ban proposed by William A. Fogle Jr., the state's secretary of licensing and regulation. The board is expected to vote on the proposal in January.
EXPLORE
January 31, 2012
The Baltimore Washington Corridor Chamber will hold its Women in Business breakfast Friday, Feb. 10 from 9:15 to 11:30 a.m. at Homewood Suites by Hilton, 8320 Benson Drive, in Columbia. Topic is fitness and the workplace. Cost is $25 prepaid members, $45 members not prepaid and non-members. Register online, http://www.baltwashchamber.org/eventsdetail.aspx?EventID=926. A 48-hour notice is required on all cancellations, 301-725-4000.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2014
The deadline is Friday for people to nominate their favorite employers for The Baltimore Sun's fourth annual list of the region's top workplaces. Last year, 100 companies were recognized as Top Workplaces in the Baltimore region. Cybersecurity firm KEYW Corp. topped last year's list for large employers, unseating two-time winner FutureCare, which operates skilled nursing centers. The McDonogh School ranked No. 1 among midsize employers, and IntelliGenesis, a Columbia-based software developer for national security applications, rose to the top of the small-business list.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Business author Richie Frieman has studied fine arts at the University of Maryland, launched a music-focused Internet magazine, written children's books, invented a device that keeps shirt collars crisp and created a pop culture-inspired children's clothing line - Charm City Babies. He even toured the Mid-Atlantic as a professional wrestler, retiring in 2008. So what does all of that have to do with good manners? Frieman, author of workplace etiquette book "Reply All … And Other Ways to Tank Your Career," considers himself an artist first and foremost.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2014
When people talk about the top places to work, the same words pop up again and again - purpose, flexibility, collaboration, respect, challenging and rewarding. Does that describe your company? Do you enjoy going to work? Does it feel more like a team, or even a family? The Baltimore Sun is seeking nominations for its fourth annual list of the region's top workplaces. Last year, 100 companies were recognized as Top Workplaces in the Baltimore region. Cybersecurity firm KEYW Corp.
NEWS
By Ann Kirschner | April 28, 2014
As we enter graduation season, students across the country will be worrying less about final exams and more about jobs. What will make them stand out to employers? Working, studying or volunteering away from the United States is one key strategy. Ask a recent graduate about the best experience they had in college, and I bet that you will hear "study abroad" as often as any other answer. It is ironic, but not surprising, that the most transformative college experience is often the one that happened far away from college.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
I've been following the debate over the Carroll County commissioners opening their meetings with Christian prayer ( "Carroll commissioners vote to halt sectarian prayers," April 8). For some reason, there are people who can't seem to get down to business without invoking their religious beliefs. I have worked for the federal government for more than 30 years, and before that I taught in a public school for nine years. I have been to thousands of meetings and never once has anyone felt the need to open or close those meetings with a prayer.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
As a government and politics major at the University of Maryland, Joe Chapman knew he might end up working for the federal government. "It was not always at the top of my list for a career, but it was among the places that I knew I was going to shoot for," the Bowie man said. Chapman said plenty of students at the university, on the edge of the nation's capital and a Metro ride away from many of its federal agencies, felt the same way. But now, as a 26-year-old program analyst for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Chapman said he is "one of a very few 20-somethings" in his office.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
The panels on the stand-up display feature the words of a dozen women who survived domestic violence, telling why they stayed and how they left. Growing out of a larger effort to tackle domestic abuse - or intimate partner violence - as an issue affecting health and safety in the workplace, Kaiser Permanente sends the display, featuring the stories of its employees, around to its medical centers. The project aims to "to open up a conversation, to let employees and members know they're not the only one who may be experiencing domestic violence," said Ann Jordan, program manager for women's health at Kaiser, which offers domestic violence prevention programs to employees, including on-site services, referrals to community services such as shelters and training to recognize signs of abuse.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Two decades before Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg wrote the best-seller "Lean In," urging women to empower themselves at work, a handful of female leaders in Baltimore joined forces to do the same thing. Network 2000, a statewide nonprofit, was launched in 1993 with a mission to promote the advancement of women in executive and leadership positions, and provide them guidance to help them succeed. Over the years, the organization's ranks have grown to 84 members — mostly women — who are, among other things, CEOs, bank presidents, judges, heads of nonprofits and entrepreneurs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Janis Smith feels a lot healthier - and more confident - since shedding 65 pounds in six months, and that has helped in her job leading employee training for 1st Mariner Bank. "Being in front of a classroom of people … I don't feel like everyone is looking at me, they're listening to what I'm saying versus what I look like," said Smith, 55, a vice president and director for the Baltimore-based bank. "I just have a lot more energy. I have more stamina. I feel like I have a clearer mind.
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