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NEWS
August 26, 1992
With the exception of Eleanor Roosevelt, no wife of a president or presidential candidate has been the target of the kind of political attacks the Republican Party is now aiming at Hillary Clinton. But then, no candidate's wife has compiled the high-visibility resume that distinguishes Ms. Clinton's career as a corporate lawyer and a national advocate for children and their ,, welfare.In Houston last week, the GOP devoted an unprecedented amount of prime time exposure to the wives of their candidates.
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NEWS
Susan Cochran | August 25, 2014
On Aug. 26, 1920, Congress certified passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing all women citizens the right to vote. The jubilant day - since proclaimed "Women's Equality Day" - climaxed a long persistent half-century campaign for women's suffrage and led to the creation that year of the League of Women Voters. But equality did not automatically come along with the right to vote. And today, nearly a century later, there is still much work to be done. While significant progress has been made through legislation and court action in reversing laws and practices detrimental to women - including those by banks and lenders denying women mortgages on homes and care loans - inequities remain.
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FEATURES
June 2, 1993
A nationwide survey of working women reveals that, in a reversal of a decades-old trend, the majority of women said they did not prefer male bosses.The Working Woman magazine survey, "What Women Think of Women Bosses," appears in the June issue."
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 9, 2014
The working population is heading toward retirement like lemmings to the edge of the cliff - about 10,000 Americans turn 65 every day. And although that age is no longer the hard and fast stop date it was in the past, it is certainly a watershed moment. At 65, there is no denying the end of working life is approaching. If we baby boomers have rewritten the books at every life stage, we will certainly add to that book in retirement. And women may get a chapter all their own. The women who entered the workforce in such numbers in the late 1960s and 1970s are approaching retirement now, but their resumes don't look much like their male counterpart's, and it is likely to affect their retirement decisions.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 21, 1994
Sharon Prost is a high-powered, type-A, Washington lawyer who's got herself a big-time job as Sen. Orrin Hatch's legalcounsel.She thought she had it all, as having it all gets defined these days for women. She had a husband, two kids and a career.Now, she has a career.Well, technically she still has kids, but she just lost custody of them in a divorce case. She didn't beat her kids. She didn't abuse them. She lost them because . . . she works too hard.The judge wrote, as reported in the New York Times, that Prost was "more devoted to and absorbed by her work and her career than anything else in her life, including her health, her children and her family."
BUSINESS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and the U.S. Department of Labor kicked off a project yesterday that honors local employers for taking steps to help working women.A dozen companies and institutions -- ranging from a recycling firm to a hotel -- now are part of the Labor Department's "Working Women Count Honor Roll." The companies pledged to aid working women by offering flexible working schedules, extended maternity leave, improved health benefits or job training and advancement."I would like to formally challenge Baltimore companies to follow the lead of these companies," said Mayor Schmoke before about 50 working women at City Hall.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | February 3, 1992
There are lists of the best- and worst-dressed women, the most respected women, the sexiest women, top companies to work for and the most "family-friendly" businesses.But an important list is missing: The top non-profit agencies that help women succeed -- and survive -- on the job.They do exist and are concerned about equal rights, flexible hours, pay equity, job sharing, pension rights, older women's employment and career guidance and training.Though there are hundreds of local organizations throughout the country, the following list is of national organizations only:Equal Rights Advocates: Provides legal advice and representation on employment issues such as sexual harassment and pay discrimination.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 18, 2002
Last weekend, the Baltimore Playwrights Festival premiered plays by two of its veteran writers. The Whispers of Saints is Mark Scharf's 10th festival production, Amanda's Line is Kathleen Barber's eighth. Neither play is its author's best work. Both, however, display flashes of talent and are well cast. And, coincidentally, both concern relationships between women. Scharf focuses on the troubled bond between a mother and her grown daughter. Each of these women is dealing with a crisis stemming from a relationship with a man. Reeling from the unexpected news that her husband wants a divorce, Laura (the daughter)
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Jill Rosen and Hanah Cho and Jill Rosen and,hanah.cho@baltsun.com and jill.rosen@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
Even when Claudia Morrell's three daughters were small, she logged 60-hour workweeks, nights and weekends included, as a technology executive. Not feeling "perpetually guilty" was her biggest challenge. But never once did she consider herself an unfit mother. "My kids always knew I loved them, what I was doing was important and would help their futures and that mothers need to have lives, too," says Morrell, who lives in Perry Hall. "My kids turned out OK, and I think I'm a role model for them."
BUSINESS
By Norimitsu Onishi and Norimitsu Onishi,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 10, 1992
Dearborn, Mich.Back in 1980 Jackie McLure adopted a 3-month-old daughter and took a leave of absence from her job as an administrative assistant at a hospital. But, she soon grew restless for something else to do.So Ms. McLure accepted some projects from her former employer. And several months later, the computer novice decided to start a desktop publishing business in her home."I had to look in a dictionary and see what RAM meant," said the 45-year-old Ms. McLure, founder and owner of Jacque Consulting, in Dearborn.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | September 2, 2013
I was in the waiting room of my doctor's office the other day when I overheard a conversation between three women behind the desk. "I've been too busy to take my break," complained a receptionist sitting at a computer. "Thank God it's Friday!" said another young woman carrying a stack of folders. A third, who had been scheduling appointments, put down the receiver and said, "I dread week-ends - cleaning, laundry, shopping, soccer games ... " And that's when I heard something so funny, I had to raise my magazine so as not to be seen laughing.
NEWS
June 6, 2012
If Maryland's resident pit bull, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, has demonstrated anything in her several decades in Congress and as dean of Senate women, it's a willingness to stand up for the less powerful in society, and she was at it again this week advocating for the Paycheck Fairness Act and the rights of women to secure equal pay for equal work. To the surprise of no one, Senate Republicans were unmoved by the cause and blocked the much-needed legislation from floor debate as it fell eight votes short of the 60 required.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Women make considerably less money than men in Maryland: 83 cents to the dollar, according to a study released last week. Windsor Mill resident Alison Assanah-Carroll was not surprised by the finding from the National Partnership for Women & Families, which showed that nearly a half-century after the federal Equal Pay Act was enacted, women are still paid less than men, not only in Maryland but nationwide. "It's not just a grave disparity, it's a travesty," said Assanah-Carroll, a former assistant regional census manager, who said that she earned less than her male counterparts even though she had better educational credentials and, in some cases, more experience.
NEWS
By Mary Rizzo | December 21, 2010
Hampden has become center stage — again — for debate about the image of Baltimore. In 2009 we had "flamingo-gate," and now, in the waning days of 2010, everyone is talking about the Hon trademark controversy. Denise Whiting, owner of CafĂ© Hon and the HonBar and creator of Hampden's annual HonFest, has decided to trademark the word "Hon," to limit and control its public, commercial use. Many people are angry, feeling that Ms. Whiting is laying claim to something that she has no right to own. (Others argue that while "hon" is a popular term in Baltimore, it's hardly unique to Charm City.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Jill Rosen and Hanah Cho and Jill Rosen and,hanah.cho@baltsun.com and jill.rosen@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
Even when Claudia Morrell's three daughters were small, she logged 60-hour workweeks, nights and weekends included, as a technology executive. Not feeling "perpetually guilty" was her biggest challenge. But never once did she consider herself an unfit mother. "My kids always knew I loved them, what I was doing was important and would help their futures and that mothers need to have lives, too," says Morrell, who lives in Perry Hall. "My kids turned out OK, and I think I'm a role model for them."
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
It's a common side effect of many antidepressants: decreased sexual function. For years, doctors have known that men with the problem can get help from Viagra. Now a study confirms that the little blue pill may also help women. The research, which appears in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, found that women who took Viagra reported increased levels of sexual functioning, compared with those who took a placebo. "It worked well for this group, not quite as strong as the men, but better than any other medicine [for sexual dysfunction]
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | September 2, 2013
I was in the waiting room of my doctor's office the other day when I overheard a conversation between three women behind the desk. "I've been too busy to take my break," complained a receptionist sitting at a computer. "Thank God it's Friday!" said another young woman carrying a stack of folders. A third, who had been scheduling appointments, put down the receiver and said, "I dread week-ends - cleaning, laundry, shopping, soccer games ... " And that's when I heard something so funny, I had to raise my magazine so as not to be seen laughing.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
When women decided to go to work en masse in the 1970s and had nothing to wear, Ellen Tracy came to the rescue. Ellen Tracy is no super-feminist, symbol of women's rights - or even a real person. It's the label of a fashion house that was savvy enough to realize that being a career woman didn't necessarily have to mean dressing like a man. To many, Tracy became their best friend - albeit a pricey one. And if they looked behind the labels of those well-cut jackets and skirts, they'd find a fellow working woman named Linda Allard.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | February 24, 2008
As chairwoman of the Harford County Commission for Women, Lisa Tittle is brimming with ideas on how to improve the lives of women. Why not start a halfway house with training programs for women leaving prison, she asked. How about opening a school for young mothers, who want to return to class but cannot overcome hurdles like child care and transportation? Maybe the commission should lend its support to the Homecoming Project, an association that helps women recovering from substance abuse.
NEWS
October 17, 2007
The Howard County Commission for Women and Howard Community College will co-sponsor a workshop, "Getting the Pay You Deserve: Women Negotiating Better Salaries," on Oct. 27 at the college. Evelyn Murphy, founder and president of the Wage Project and author of Getting Even: Why Women Don't Get Paid Like Men and What To Do About It, will speak. Breakfast will be served from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Two workshops - "Start Smart" for women in college and "Get What You're Worth, Get What You Want" for women in or returning to the workplace - will be held from 10:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration is required.
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