Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWorking Poor
IN THE NEWS

Working Poor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 5, 1995
Gerald Ford put it into law. Ronald Reagan extolled it as "the best anti-poverty, the best pro-family, the best job-creation measure to come out of Congress." George Bush expanded the program still more. Called the Earned Income Tax Credit, it fulfills Republican objectives in rewarding work, drawing people off welfare and raising up the working poor above the poverty level without increasing minimum wages.So why are some of the gung-ho conservatives on Capitol Hill intent on slashing away at a popular, bipartisan federal initiative that helps 14 million low-income Americans make ends meet?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 5, 2014
House of Delegates can take an important step toward lifting the prospects of Maryland's working poor this week when it votes on a measure to gradually increase the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. But amendments the House made to Gov. Martin O'Malley's legislation will dampen its impact and all but ensure that whatever gains low-wage workers make will be temporary. To be sure, the legislation as amended would still represent an important advance. Setting the rate at $10.10 an hour effectively restores the minimum wage's purchasing power to what it was in the 1960s, and the House Economic Matters Committee beat back the idea of setting a lower wage tier in the state's rural counties.
Advertisement
NEWS
By June Kurtz and June Kurtz,Contributing writer | August 14, 1991
Twenty-seven-year-old Zoa V. Wilson of Westminster worked as a waitress until she landed a higher-paying job in telephone sales at RandomHouse Inc.But Wilson was forced to quit the sales job at the Westminster company because her increased income disqualified her from child care aid for her 4-year-old son, she said."
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 11, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will stand in for Gov. Martin O'Malley in making the administration's case to a House committee Tuesday for raising Maryland's minimum wage. O'Malley had been scheduled to testify before the House Economic Matters Committee , in one of his last appearances before the General Assembly.  But he will instead attend the funeral of Baltimore construction magnate and philanthropist Willard Hackerman , who died Monday at age 95. The House panel will hear from a bevy of supporters and opponents of increasing the state's lowest hourly pay rate in stages to $10.10 an hour by 2016.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 19, 2003
BOSTON - And now for some news from the stalled economy: Scorn is trending a wee bit up. Not that long ago, scorn and its handmaidens - disdain and neglect - were pretty much reserved for the welfare poor. The working poor, by comparison, were publicly praised as Americans who "played by the rules." They were folks who warranted a helping hand. But now the rules have officially changed. The line between the deserving and the undeserving poor has moved up a couple of notches on the socioeconomic scale.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2000
TWO YEARS AGO, the home of a Lothian woman and her nine children burned to the ground days before Christmas. The southern Anne Arundel family lost everything it owned. When word of the tragedy reached Arnold resident John T. Brewer, he quickly stepped in to save the family's Christmas. His heart must be at least 10 times regular size. Brewer has been making such rescues for a decade, arriving on Christmas Eve morning in his red and white costume, looking so authentic that children might glance roofward, expecting to see reindeer.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 12, 2000
WASHINGTON - Ending a long-running dispute, federal officials agreed this week to give Maryland $24 million to help fund a health insurance program for children of the working poor. Maryland health officials said the money would help pay for the initiative and make it easier to add children once the program expands in July 2001. "People have been working very hard" to obtain the money, said Dr. Georges Benjamin, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. "This will help us expand our coverage," Benjamin said.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2000
Settling into his metal-frame bunk bed each night, in a room crowded with 23 other homeless men, Ervin Rogers imagines his future, one filled, he says, with brightness, hope and a little brick duplex on a quiet street in the suburbs. "I'm going to have my own place, and it's going to be away from all the madness of downtown Baltimore," says Rogers, 39, a quiet man with penetrating eyes framed by wire-rimmed glasses. "Glen Burnie would be nice." Rogers, a recovering crack addict, has lived at the bustling Helping Up Mission on East Baltimore Street for two years.
NEWS
By Cyril T. Zaneski and Cyril T. Zaneski,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2003
Reflecting an ailing economy, a record number of children are seeking toys, clothing and food in the Salvation Army of Greater Baltimore's annual holiday gift program. And the organization - like many other charities - is expecting a struggle for donations to meet the rising need. Parents and grandparents have registered 11,129 children in the Angel Tree Program, up 20 percent from the 8,894 who received gifts a year ago, Salvation Army officials said. Unlike past years, when most seeking help from the Salvation Army were unemployed and on welfare, people requesting help this year are minimum-wage workers who cannot afford to buy presents and still afford rent and food, said Peggy Vick, the organization's director of family services.
NEWS
June 3, 1998
WHEN the U.S. Senate begins consideration next week of the president's proposed budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development, one aspect worth noting is its attempt to expand housing alternatives for the working poor.Without those options, a growing number of suburban households will find themselves priced out of the booming rental market. In addition, welfare to work is little more than an illusion without more units of affordable housing, convenient to suburban job growth.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Regarding your editorial against Baltimore County blocking affordable housing in Rosedale, my son has some college, works as an electrical journeyman and has held the same job for 10 years, has a credit score in the high 700s and owns his own car ( "Just saying no isn't good enough," Nov. 20). He also has two disabilities - narcolepsy and epilepsy. He lives in a cramped, two-bedroom apartment with his wife and three kids and is on a waiting list for a three-bedroom apartment which they may not be able to afford.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 11, 2013
While all eyes are on Syria and on America's response, the real economy in which most Americans live is sputtering. More than four years after the recession officially ended, 11.5 million Americans are unemployed, many of them for years. Nearly 4 million have given up looking for work altogether. If they were actively looking, today's unemployment rate would be 9.5 percent instead of 7.3 percent. The share of the population working or seeking a job is the lowest in 35 years. The unemployment rate among high-school dropouts is 11 percent; for blacks, 13 percent.
NEWS
By David Stoll | July 8, 2013
After many ups and downs, Congressional passage of comprehensive immigration reform now looks possible. In exchange for tighter border controls, an estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants will receive a path to citizenship. The biggest players in the U.S. immigration debate will get more legal immigrants, more family reunification, more guest workers and more sophisticated enforcement. So will the rest of us — including the 22 million Americans who, according to the Labor Department, are unemployed, underemployed or too discouraged to even look for work.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
I must take issue with letter writer Stanley Glinka's assertion that it was "the policy of forcing banks to give loans to people who could not afford them" that led to our current financial mess ("Stop blaming Bush," May 1). First of all, we need to remember that the bad loans that crashed the economy were in the trillions of dollars, and low-income Americans obviously did not receive trillions of dollars in loans in the years up to the crash. There is legislation called the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA)
NEWS
October 1, 2011
I empathize with Peter French's letter about the difficulties teachers in poor communities face ("Even without No Child Left Behind, teaching is debased," Sept. 29). My family arrived in America penniless in 1969 and we lived in the slums of Brooklyn, where I trudged through broken glass and filth to get to school every day. So I know a little about the poverty of which he speaks, and the mentality that makes children growing up in its midst difficult to teach. Too many parents behave as if they don't want to have anything to do with their children's education.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2010
City schools CEO Andrés Alonso has vowed to begin new initiatives to combat student truancy after the city's performance on state tests showed an average achievement gap of 25 percentage points between elementary and middle school students who are repeatedly absent and those who attend regularly. The superintendent said he would focus on student attendance, even if it means deploying central office staff to knock on the doors of students who are chronically absent — which means they miss more than 20 days of school a year.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
Maryland suffered some of the biggest employment losses in the nation last month, shedding 13,800 jobs between January and February. Given the state's recession-driven economic woes, the last thing lawmakers should be considering is to make it more difficult for low-income people to get to work. But that's exactly what a major increase in the fares charged by the Maryland Transit Administration would do -- make it that much tougher to match the unemployed with jobs. Just as legislators are rightly reluctant to raise taxes in the midst of a recession, raising fares by a staggering 30 percent or more is a tax that hits the poor hardest and a policy that can only hinder the recovery.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.