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By Abby Karpand Randi Henderson | January 8, 1991
For many working parents, winter storms follow a pattern as simple as one . . . two . . . arrggh!First, it snows.Next, schools close.Finally, parents must leave work to pick up their children, either taking the rest of the day off to baby-sit or hauling them to the "Aww, Ma, there's nothing to do there" office.Betty Kavanagh's day fit that pattern yesterday.Leaving in the morning for her job at Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland, she stopped on the way to drop her daughter, April Kavanagh Ballard, at school.
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NEWS
By Katie V. Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Lisa Schlossnagle is accustomed to giving her time to Fulton Elementary School. As a parent and volunteer, she spends time aiding teachers in her daughters' classrooms, representing the school as its PTA delegate, and attending countywide meetings report on issues facing the school system. She has taken roles at the classroom level, including as a tutor for the A-OK (Assist Our Kids) program, and at the systemwide level as a representative on the committee that worked on redistricting proposals last year.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | December 13, 2006
Michelle Stone worries about her two children once they leave school even though they are enrolled in an after-school program. Working parents like Stone should not be the only ones concerned about what their children are doing after school. A new study calls on employers to care, and to implement programs and policies to alleviate such parental anxiety among workers. Catalyst, a nonprofit research organization that works to expand opportunities for women at work, and the Women's Studies Research Center at Brandeis University, examined what they have coined PCAST, or parental concern about after-school time.
NEWS
February 17, 2008
The majority of children witness 100,000 acts of violence before they leave elementary school, according to a recent study. Children are exposed to violence from myriad sources including movies and video games. The impact on children's minds hasn't been determined, but we might be seeing the results in teen violence on the streets and in the schools. But when police were called to quell fights at four Anne Arundel County high schools during the 2006-2007 school year, the Anne Arundel County government, the county public schools and Anne Arundel Community College decided to collaborate to come up with creative solutions to help families and communities.
NEWS
By JANE WALDFOGEL | June 22, 2006
This month all across America, working parents will face the familiar challenges of summer - most important, keeping their children safe and occupied during the long school break. Schools, after all, are the major provider of care for children of working parents. And when schools close for the summer, parents must scramble. Two-thirds of American children live with two working parents or a single working parent. Yet most schools are open only 30 hours a week, 180 days a year, and they usually don't serve children under age 5. In fact, between the birth of a child and the child's 18th birthday, schools cover only one-third of the hours that a parent working full-time is at work or commuting.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
Maryland's children are less likely than ever to live with both their parents -- and when they do, the parents usually must juggle child-rearing and work, according to a study being released today.Only 22 percent of Maryland children in 1990 lived in the "traditional family of breadwinner dad and homemaker mom" where one parent works and the other stays home, says the national report by the Center for the Study of Social Policy, a Washington think tank. In only eight U.S. states did a smaller percentage of children live in traditional families.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 2, 1996
A GREAT MANY social ills have been laid like kindling at the feet of the single parent. Her hands are tied (it is most often a mother) to the stake of public opinion as she waits for someone to strike a match.Poverty, difficulty at school, early experimentation with sex, drugs and alcohol, petty crime and delinquency. Social scientists confidently predict these things for the children of the woman who tries to raise them without a man around the house. She is blamed for every blemish on society from the disintegration of the family dinner hour to the epidemic of coldhearted teen-age criminals.
NEWS
By Cindy Krischer Goodman and Cindy Krischer Goodman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 11, 2004
We finally get our work-family routine under control, and then summer hits. Sure, there are no lunches to pack, soccer practices or homework to review, but we have a bigger concern: adjusting to our kids' summer schedules. For some of us, that could mean reshifting our hours, negotiating vacation time or trying to create new boundaries for a home-based business. It's often a guilt-producing, time-consuming feat that can have you driving miles out of your way or can become quite expensive.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 1999
PETERBOROUGH, N.H. -- Touching on an anxiety that troubles many working parents -- the difficulty of raising children while also having a fulfilling work life -- former Sen. Bill Bradley proposed yesterday that federal dollars and streamlined state programs be used to ease the strain.Lamenting that "the global economy just doesn't care about the 6: 30 dinner hour," the Democratic presidential hopeful suggested ways that his administration would improve the lives of working parents.He proposed allocating $2.6 billion for various programs, including money to improve child care, an expansion of the popular Family and Medical Leave Act to cover more businesses and provide longer leaves, and $400 million more a year for community colleges.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
Whenever meteorologists begin their feverish snow forecasts, working parents can feel their blood pressure rise.For many households, the snow emergency route of the '90s leads directly to child care. All week, working couples and single parents often spent as much time setting up baby sitters as they did shoveling out their cars.Some working parents forged creative relationships among various friends, relatives, sitters and four-wheel drives. Others schlepped the kids -- heavily laden with snacks, toys and other distractions -- to the office.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | January 18, 2008
Rosalind Abankwah of Ellicott City has never taken her two elementary-school-age children to work with her on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day, always the fourth Thursday in April. "I didn't want to take them out of school for the day," said Abankwah, who works for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. But this year, the Howard County school system has scheduled a professional work day for April 24, specifically to accommodate the 15-year-old program. That means Abankwah's children, Naomi and Nathan, won't have school that day. "It just got to be such a problem in some of the schools, we decided, let's take the opportunity to have a professional work day," said Patti Caplan, the school spokeswoman and chairwoman of the school calendar committee.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | December 30, 2007
The recent graduation ceremony for the fourth class in the Howard County schools' International Parent Leadership Program was bittersweet, because it also marked the departure of its coordinator, Young-chan Han. Han -- who has accepted a job as parent-involvement specialist with the Program Improvement and Family Support Branch of the Maryland State Department of Education -- will work with families in Maryland's Title I schools, which serve large numbers...
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | December 13, 2006
Michelle Stone worries about her two children once they leave school even though they are enrolled in an after-school program. Working parents like Stone should not be the only ones concerned about what their children are doing after school. A new study calls on employers to care, and to implement programs and policies to alleviate such parental anxiety among workers. Catalyst, a nonprofit research organization that works to expand opportunities for women at work, and the Women's Studies Research Center at Brandeis University, examined what they have coined PCAST, or parental concern about after-school time.
NEWS
By JANE WALDFOGEL | June 22, 2006
This month all across America, working parents will face the familiar challenges of summer - most important, keeping their children safe and occupied during the long school break. Schools, after all, are the major provider of care for children of working parents. And when schools close for the summer, parents must scramble. Two-thirds of American children live with two working parents or a single working parent. Yet most schools are open only 30 hours a week, 180 days a year, and they usually don't serve children under age 5. In fact, between the birth of a child and the child's 18th birthday, schools cover only one-third of the hours that a parent working full-time is at work or commuting.
NEWS
January 18, 2006
Paid leave laws aid working families The Sun's article "A parental choice in workplace" (Jan. 11) describes the challenges presented when a child gets sick. But strangely, it focuses on upper-income, two-parent families. While sick children present complications for parents of all income levels, at least in the cases presented the family has two parents to share the load, the financial wherewithal to purchase help when it is available and benevolent employers who provide paid leave and flexible working conditions to make things much easier.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH HEUBECK and ELIZABETH HEUBECK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2006
A child's sniffle can send working parents into a panic. So can a weather forecast predicting snow. But at least they offer warnings. The dreaded call at the office does not. Investment broker Sean Murphy of Bel Air sums up the all-too-typical scenario: "My wife is in a meeting. I have an appointment. The day care calls and says my son just threw up. We're both an hour away from the day care center." When Murphy and his wife, Erin, both employees of Ferris Baker Watts in Baltimore, get such a call, they have to act fast.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
For Chris and Susan Helmrath, there wasn't a single moment it became clear that one of them should stop working to be with their children.It was the accumulation of small moments, some that occurred when their children were in child care. "When you heard things like `your son started walking today,' " said Chris Helmrath, a corporate finance consultant for Clifton Gunderson, a large accounting firm. "I remember that one the greatest."So, after working through the toddlerhoods of their two elder children, the Helmraths decided six years ago they would do with less so Susan could leave her job as a recruiter and paralegal for a law firm and stay home with their children, now 11, 9 and 6. For the Helmraths, who live in Ellicott City, the switch by no means meant poverty.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | June 23, 1991
Some things are harder about raising children when we're working parents; some are easier. But for most of us, discipline is the most difficult part of being a parent. Here are some of the tricks the smart working parents I know use when it's time to set rules for their children, then enforce them:* They give themselves time to shift gears. No parent should make decisions about discipline when he or she first walks through the door after a day in the rat race. We're entirely too likely to overreact.
TOPIC
By Rosa Brooks and Rosa Brooks,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 26, 2005
Summer's here, and for most American children, school's out. But it's still appropriate to administer a painless little diagnostic quiz. Here goes: 1. When I contemplate the prospect of a 10-week school vacation, I feel: A. Joy. B. Panic. If you answered "A," chances are that you're a little kid. Give yourself 10 points for precocity (you're reading the newspaper!) and another 10 just for being a little kid. If you answered "B," you're probably a parent. Deduct 10 points. If that strikes you as unfair, you're right, but if you're a parent, you really ought to be used to unfairness by now. For parents, lengthy school "vacations" are no kind of vacation at all. That tenuous stability achieved during the rest of the year - when, barring the usual illnesses and "weather events," you had child care for the better part of each day - is gone, gone, gone.
NEWS
By Cindy Krischer Goodman and Cindy Krischer Goodman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 11, 2004
We finally get our work-family routine under control, and then summer hits. Sure, there are no lunches to pack, soccer practices or homework to review, but we have a bigger concern: adjusting to our kids' summer schedules. For some of us, that could mean reshifting our hours, negotiating vacation time or trying to create new boundaries for a home-based business. It's often a guilt-producing, time-consuming feat that can have you driving miles out of your way or can become quite expensive.
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