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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 5, 1999
BOSTON -- Oh not again, not another Page 1 story on work, mothers and children. Haven't we been there, done this? Do we have to stay there, doing this?This week's news bulletin was the latest in a series of similar studies showing that "mothers who work outside the home are not harming their children." And while I hate to complain about good news, even the author found that "the most shocking result of the study was the overwhelming response."On Monday, Elizabeth Harvey's voice mail at the University of Massachusetts was stuffed with so many calls from reporters that she stopped counting at around 100. "I knew it was a hot issue and people felt strongly about it," says the psychologist, who is pregnant with her first child, "but this really brought it into my own world."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
Rosalie A. "Rosie" Fonner, a registered nurse who had worked for several decades in the mother-baby unit at University of Maryland Medical Center, where she relished her role as an advocate, died Feb. 3 of cancer at her Halethorpe home. She was 62. "Rosie was an incredible advocate for moms who were disadvantaged by addiction or their social situation. She would encourage them that they could be good moms," said the Rev. David Harness, a Church of God pastor who is one of the medical center's chaplains.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 6, 2000
Radio talk show host Dr. Laura wants me to introduce myself this way: "Hi. My name is Susan, and I'm my kids' mom." That's what she expects from her women callers. We're supposed to let the world know right off that our children come first and that we define ourselves in terms of our relationship to them. If we have trouble getting the words out, we can go online to drlaura.com and buy a T-shirt or a sweatshirt that will announce it for us. And if we have trouble understanding why this should be so, we can read all about our selfish and neglectful selves in her new book, "Parenthood by Proxy: Don't Have Them If You Won't Raise Them," a mean-spirited indictment of working mothers.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
On her second try for the title, a Harford County wife and working mother was crowned Mrs. Maryland and will represent the state in the national pageant this summer. Heather Ziehl of Bel Air, who founded the community service and networking group True Housewives, was crowned Mrs. Maryland 2013 this weekend, beating out four other contenders at Baltimore's Crowne Plaza. Ziehl, a 34-year-old who runs marketing and events for Arc of the Northern Chesapeake, who competed as Mrs. Northern Chesapeake, had been first runner-up last year, the first time she ever entered a pageant.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | May 24, 1993
Just as Katherine Wyse Goldman was getting into the car that would take her to the airport from her suburban Philadelphia home, her 5-year-old daughter, Molly, ran up to her, sobbing. The girl had fallen in the mud, and her clothes were dirty, and she needed Mommy, no one else, just Mommy, to help her change.So Ms. Goldman ran inside, the baby sitter beside her, and picked out a clean outfit for her daughter, stayed long enough to soothe the tears and elicit a smile, then ran downstairs to catch the ride to the airport, where a jet would take her to Boston to promote her new book, her first book, entitled "My Mother Worked and I Turned Out Okay."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 23, 1998
YOU ARE DOING just fine, you haven't made a big mistake, don't blame yourself for everything, the kids will be OK.Those words of encouragement are as necessary as air for the working mother who is gasping for breath as she rushes between her job and home. But she hears them so seldomly that her dark certainty that she is doing neither task well feeds on itself and grows.Working mothers are blamed for everything from the rise of adolescent killers to the decline of the family dinner hour, and they wear that blame like a hair shirt, their penance for daring to live beyond the boundaries that confined their mothers or grandmothers.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As if working mothers didn't have enough to worry about, now comes word that their sons are more likely to lose their virginity at a younger age than teens whose mothers don't work.A new study estimates that the sons of mothers who worked full-time were 45 percent more likely to have sex at an earlier age than those whose mothers were not working. The odds were 25 percent higher if the mothers worked part-time.Among blacks, the correlation was even greater: sons of mothers with full-time jobs while they were growing up were 90 percent more likely to have sex earlier than boys of stay-at-home mothers and 55 percent more likely if their mothers worked part-time.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 2000
WASHINGTON - For the first time in over a decade, single mothers are more likely than married mothers to be employed, new government statistics show. The figures also show a large increase in the proportion of single mothers who are working, with explosive growth in work by low-wage women with children born out of wedlock. Economists also say there is a large increase in the number of working single mothers who have never been married. In 1993, 44 percent of them were employed. The figure shot up to 65 percent last year.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 31, 1992
NEW YORK -- Milagros Reyes took her baby boy to the hospital for a hernia operation, but had to rush away a few hours after surgery to get back to work. Her 6-month-old son, bandaged and scared, was crying as she left, but she feared that a missed day might get her fired from her $7.79-an-hour factory job.The same anxiety has also driven Ms. Reyes to ignore the advice of her baby's pediatrician who says she should quit her job. Her son, Juan Carlos, cared for by a series of poorly paid sitters, is severely underweight, the doctor told her. But Ms. Reyes feels she cannot afford to stop working.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 18, 1998
BOSTON -- Forgive me for sounding a tad ungrateful. After all, the citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts have just been granted a Small Necessities Leave. I should be part of the cheering squad.Under the terms of the law that went into effect this month, any worker can get time off to deal with some family matter. Not a big matter like cancer or childbirth. A small matter, like a doctor's appointment or a school meeting.How much time you ask? Well, here's where I hold those huzzahs.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | November 11, 2010
My mother was a legal secretary back in the day, and when she left for work, her purse matched her shoes and she wore a hat and gloves. She was a legal secretary in the mold of Della Street, for those of you who remember the Perry Mason show, but she gave up all of that when she married and started having children. Years later, when I was a young reporter for the Associated Press, my boss at the time demanded that I carry a gun when I worked the night shift. I refused. And when he declared that he would send me to an assignment where I could be murdered but not to one where I could be raped, I was too stunned to ask whether I had a choice.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Laura Marsico and girlfriends Cheryl Bernard-Smith and Laura Durington didn't give a second thought to leaving their children with their husbands for a weekend of couture, celebrities and the overall fabulousness that is New York Fashion Week. The three attended the Rebecca Taylor fashion show Sunday in Lincoln Center. It was the first time the trio had taken an overnight excursion together sans children in the past six years. It was also an opportunity for the working mothers to let their collective hair down while revisiting their big-city roots.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | October 3, 2007
I love making lists, mostly of the endless things I need to get done. So do companies and organizations. There are dozens of lists for practically everything from food to movies to fill in your choice here. Every year, Working Mother magazine compiles a list of the Top 100 best employers for working mothers. Companies are recognized for family-friendly programs, including flextime and leave policies. This year's list features many Fortune 500 companies that have been past recipients.
NEWS
By Lori Sokol | April 26, 2007
Today, on Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day, I am again keeping my children at home. Why? Because the "typical" work environment is now atypical - no longer wholly housed within a company cubicle's four walls. Employees are stepping out by staying at home, teleworking from fully equipped home-based offices, as I have been doing for the past 17 years. But today's teenagers - dubbed the "I-Generation" for their addiction to everything digital, from iPods to IM (instant messaging) - are receiving mixed messages about how, when and where they can expect to effectively balance their future careers and family lives.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
Her new bedroom is still under construction, but Jewelle Thomas already knows how she'll decorate it. She plans to hang beads from the door, arrange her doll collection on a shelf over her bed, and stash everything else in the closet. Having a room of her own is a big deal for the 11-year-old. For the past year-and-a-half, Jewelle shared a bedroom in a cramped three-bedroom Glen Burnie apartment where she lived with her mother, Natosha, and two brothers. Before that, the family lived in a one-bedroom apartment.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | April 30, 2006
FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO have a tough time keeping warring factions straight -- Hutus and Tutsis, Serbs and Croats, Sunnis and Shiites; Irish Protestants and Irish Catholics -- let me add another battling duo to the list: rich stay-at-home mothers and rich working mothers. It is the burdens of privilege that separate these factions from their sisters, the women who have to work to keep food on the table and the women who have to work two jobs to keep food on the table. Sandra Tsing Loh, a performer famous for her one-woman shows and a new contributor to The Atlantic Monthly , introduces us to this battling pair in her scathing review of Mommy Wars: Stay-At-Home and Career Moms Face Off on Their Choices, Their Lives, Their Families (Random House)
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | February 25, 1992
Children are left with relatives more often than at day careMore working mothers leave their children with grandparents, fathers and other relatives than in day care centers or in the care of non-family members, according to recent findings by the U.S. Department of Labor.About 41 percent of working mothers left their children 5 and under with relatives, according to data from National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience. About 28 percent of the mothers surveyed used non-relatives to care for their children and 23 percent left them in organized day care centers, nursery or preschools.
NEWS
April 28, 1993
Too often for comfort, parents and teachers notice disturbing phenomenon among girls when they reach adolescence. While many boys seem to blossom, equally energetic, self-confident girls lose their ambition and, it seems, a good bit of their self-esteem. No longer do they dream of becoming anything they want. More often, their main concerns are fitting in, finding acceptance, not standing out in the crowd. The result is that too many girls settle for too little as women.That is not good news for the American economy.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 29, 2005
THE NAME of the group was something like Professional Moms at Home, and I was sitting among them waiting to give a speech when I overheard one of the professional moms huffily complain. "I mean, how many grapes are there in a serving? Is it six or 12 or what? I asked my pediatrician, and he just looked at me. I mean, how are we supposed to know what makes a serving of grapes if the pediatrician doesn't know?" I wanted to turn around and say to this exasperated mother of a toddler, "Trust me. It doesn't matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Barbara Rose and Barbara Rose,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 14, 2004
Kelly Kalmes can recall a time when a secretary sat outside her corporate office. These days, her right hand is based on another continent. Kalmes, a corporate trainer and consultant, works from home in Evanston, Ill. Her assistant, Carolyn Moncel, works from home in Paris. They collaborate using e-mail, shared computer files and an Internet telephone service. "All of my clients know who Carolyn is," Kalmes said. "If I'm not around, she speaks for me." Moncel is a "virtual assistant," a personalized extension of Kalmes' business.
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