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NEWS
October 6, 1992
Setting up a committee or a working group is a common method of avoiding responsibility and delaying hard decisions. Group dynamics often perversely work against the achievement of what should be common goals.In the absence of an alternative forum, however, it can promote dialogue among parties who haven't communicated well with each other or even understood the common problem. That's why we support the creation of a working group in Harford County of state and county officials and private citizens to address thorny environmental problems.
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NEWS
January 28, 2013
The road to meaningful U.S. immigration reform will no doubt prove rocky and difficult, but at least Washington has taken its first big step on the most critical part of the route - down the so-called "path to citizenship" that now has bipartisan support in the Senate. That's quite a change since 2010 when so many in the GOP invoked the term "amnesty" as a dirty word. That's not to suggest that the findings of an eight-person work group have provided the definitive answer for the nation's dysfunctional immigration policy, but getting four prominent Republican senators to sign off on a path to citizenship is a notable accomplishment.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - The CIA is refusing to provide hundreds of thousands of pages of documents sought by a government working group under a 1998 law that requires full disclosure of classified records related to Nazi war criminals, say congressional officials from both parties. Under the law, the CIA has already provided more than 1.2 million pages of documents, the bulk of them from the archives of its World War II predecessor, the Office of Strategic Services. Many documents have been declassified, and some made public last year showed a closer relationship between the U.S. government and Nazi war criminals than had previously been understood, including the CIA's recruitment of war criminal suspects or Nazi collaborators.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
A series of public meetings for Baltimore residents to voice their concerns about preliminary plans to add more parking and an access road to Patterson Park have been canceled, according to city officials. The decision comes two days after the first meeting had city officials deflecting heated questions from a crowd of hundreds who oppose the plan, and one day after Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced the creation of a working group that will study the matter and the park's future.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 1997
UNITED NATIONS -- Reflecting the changes that democratically elected governments have brought to Latin America and the Caribbean, political "disappearances" have almost ended in the Western Hemisphere, a U.N. group of experts has concluded.Asia is now the region with the largest number of people who have vanished, apparently at the hands of armies or police forces.It is also the region with the most new cases of disappearances, say members of the panel, known as the U.N. Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, which met recently at U.N. headquarters.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and By Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2001
Baltimore-Washington International Airport should be given more autonomy to operate like an entrepreneurial business but should remain under state control rather than be turned over to an independent authority, a government working group has concluded. After conducting a three-month study, state officials and private business leaders have proposed changing the law to give airport commissioners authority to approve larger business contracts and hire staff members without seeking approval from state oversight agencies or being restricted by state salary limits.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1999
The NCAA yesterday announced dozens of proposed reforms designed to clean up college basketball. Linking scholarship allotments to graduation rates and lessening the importance of AAU tournaments in the recruiting process were among the recommendations of a 27-person committee, which spent 10 months studying the game and its ills.Some of the committee's recommendations could become NCAA rules as early as the 2000-2001 school year."We asked these folks to be `practical idealists,' " said Kenneth Shaw, the Syracuse chancellor who chaired the Division I Working Group to Study Basketball Issues.
NEWS
By Jason DeParle and Jason DeParle,New York Times News Service | November 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As part of its plan to revamp the welfare system, the Clinton administration is considering giving new federal subsidies to companies that hire or find jobs for welfare recipients.One option is to have the government pay employers directly to subsidize the wages of welfare recipients. Another is for the government to hire personnel firms that would receive a fee for each person placed in a job.Previous efforts to use corporate subsidies have generally failed, and the discussion remains in a preliminary stage.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 14, 2008
WASHINGTON -- A presidential working group issued a broad set of proposals yesterday to correct weaknesses in the way homes are financed so that the problems now crippling the nation's housing sector won't recur. The President's Working Group on Financial Markets recommended changes in virtually every area of mortgage finance. It called for tougher state and federal regulation of mortgage lending and mortgage brokers. It also supported creating a national licensing standard for anyone who originates mortgages.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Neighborhood leaders agreed yesterday to set up a "community working group" with representatives of the Brandon Shores power plant operator in hopes of resolving the controversy over its plans to transport a potentially hazardous material through Solley-area neighborhoods. "We're going to give it a shot," said Lester A. Ettlinger, who has led much of the community protest against the proposal to use anhydrous ammonia - a chemical that can cause severe lung damage and death in extreme exposure - in its new anti-pollution system.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
A day after hundreds of Baltimore residents voiced strong opposition to a preliminary plan to add more parking spaces and an access road to Patterson Park, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday that she was creating a "working group" to study the park's future. "Today, I've ordered the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Health Department to work with Councilman [James] Kraft and community stakeholders to create a Patterson Park Master Plan Working Group," Rawlings-Blake wrote in a letter sent to citizens.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
A day after hundreds of Baltimore residents voiced strong opposition to a preliminary plan to add more parking spaces and an access road to Patterson Park, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Tuesday that she was creating a “working group” to study the park's future. “Today, I've ordered the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Health Department to work with Councilman [James] Kraft and community stakeholders to create a Patterson Park Master Plan Working Group,” Rawlings-Blake wrote in a letter sent to citizens.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
For a few hours on Wednesday, Annapolis took a time warp back to 2005. The Senate badly wanted an expansion of gambling, and the governor was on its side. The House of Delegates, facing internal and external pressure to do something on an issue that had consumed the State House for years, agreed to a plan but on terms that its leaders knew nobody involved was willing to accept, and the whole exercise collapsed in a jumble of finger-pointing. If anybody can feel good about the failure this week of the special work group to consider gambling expansion, it's Republican former Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. He was on the losing side of the 2005 gambling fight, and at least he can now take solace that it wasn't just him; Democratic Gov.Martin O'Malley wasn't able to seal the deal in 2012 either.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
The work group set up by Gov.Martin O'Malleyto try to reach a consensus on whether to expand gambling in Maryland is continuing to meet behind closed doors as a Who's Who of the state's lobbying corp cools their heels outside a House committee room where the panel was scheduled to hold a public session at 1 p.m. About 3 p.m., alternate member Sen. George Edwards emerged to hit the road for Western Maryland and said it could be a while longer before...
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | June 18, 2012
Members of Gov. Martin O'Malley's work group on expanding gambling are meeting today behind shut doors in the House office building in Annapolis. The group convened a little after 11 a.m. -- and members were mum on what was on the agenda. The next public meeting for the group is set for Wednesday. Matt Gallagher, chief of staff to O'Malley, asked a reporter from The Baltimore Sun to leave saying the meeting was closed. A staffer for Senate Republican Leader E. J. Pipkin was also booted.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Maryland could gain as much as $161 million in revenue by authorizing a casino in Prince George's County and adding table games statewide, the staff of the General Assembly and its consultants told a work group on gambling expansion Tuesday. The combined report discounted concerns that a proposed casino outside Washington would draw too much business away from others at Arundel Mills and in downtown Baltimore. Current casino licensees, now limited to slot machines, could end up ahead in net revenue by adding table games such as roulette and blackjack, the Department of Legislative Services and PricewaterhouseCoopers said.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Horn and Patricia Horn,Maryland Nonprofits 1994 Nonprofit Database.Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1994
They feed the hungry and teach the three R's. They bathe the sick and spread the Good Word.Maryland's nonprofit organizations -- churches, hospitals, museums, soup kitchens -- benefit from this do-good image, but they also do more, a new study says.They not only feed the hungry; they also feed the economy."The importance of the sector goes far beyond the good work of these organizations. Maryland's nonprofit sector is also a major economic force," said Peter V. Berns, executive director of the Maryland Association of Nonprofit Organizations, which is scheduled to release the study today on the state's nonprofit sector.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Although President Clinton last wee renewed his pledge to "end welfare as we know it," aides drafting his plan acknowledge that the effort could be expensive and might even force him to scale back or delay action nationwide.The centerpiece of Mr. Clinton's plan is his pledge to impose a two-year limit on welfare benefits. It was one of his most popular campaign themes and holds an allure for the centrist and conservative legislators he is now courting, since it sounds like a tough-talking, economizing move.
NEWS
May 22, 2012
Our biggest concerns about the push to expand gambling at the end of this spring's regular session of the General Assembly were that there had been insufficient public debate about all of the changes slots boosters wanted to institute and that there was too little reliable information about the performance of Maryland's existing gambling program. Gov.Martin O'Malley's announcement Monday of a work group to expanded gambling in time for a possible special session of the legislature July 9 does nothing to erase those qualms.
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