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By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | September 3, 2000
It's been a long time since Democratic presidential candidates kicked off their campaigns with Labor Day rallies in downtown Detroit, but Vice President Al Gore is gambling that working-class voters will decide this election. Gore has settled on a stump speech that recalls his party's populist traditions: "fighting for working families," siding with "the people, not the powerful," and bashing Big Oil, insurance companies and drug companies. While it is boosting his poll ratings, Gore's rhetoric is receiving mixed reviews.
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NEWS
February 16, 2013
There is absolutely nothing bold about forcing the working class to pay for the sins of rent seekers and predatory capitalists. The mayor has once more proven, in her State of the City address, that her only concern is protecting and advancing the interests of developers, corporations and financiers ("Mayor calls for trash pickup fee, 10 percent cut in city workforce" Feb. 11). The focus of the mayor's comments on the city's economy reflect a neo-liberal fixation on privatization, erosion of the middle class, and depriving city residents of services all in the name of "fiscal responsibility" and solving a "crisis" which is, at best, a possibility.
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NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2000
In his campaign speeches, Vice President Al Gore tells audiences that he wants "middle-class tax cuts." Lest there be any doubt, he promises that his economic plan has "one guiding purpose: to help the middle-class families." When George W. Bush speaks of cutting taxes, he rhetorically targets the same crowd. One of his fundamental goals if elected president, Bush says, will be "to treat the middle class more fairly." But what is this middle class? Jeff Bradley, who makes $20,000 a year working for Sam's Shoe Service, a repair shop in Columbus, Ohio, has five children who receive their health insurance through Medicaid.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
"You know when you see John Ellsberry's painted alligator at the end of the 28th Street Bridge that you're in Remington," said Kathleen C. Ambrose, who is researching and writing a history of the more than 200-year-old Baltimore neighborhood that she hopes to have published next year. She has been banging on doors, interviewing old-timers and, in a recent edition of the Remington Community Newsletter asked residents to search their closets and attics for any photographs from 1930 to 2000 that she might use for her book.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 24, 2002
THE HOUSE in Arbutus will do just fine. That's where Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. says he'll launch his campaign tomorrow for governor of Maryland. It's his very own political log cabin, the boyhood working-class home that neither money nor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend could buy. And that's the point. In the American working-class system, most of us like to identify with the workers. Ehrlich's dad has been a car salesman at Archway Ford on Reisterstown Road. His mom's a secretary. They sound like neighborhood folks, who fret over mortgage payments and the cost of new shoes for school the way the rest of us do. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's father was famously martyred.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 23, 1994
I forgave Tonya when she did not tell authorities what she knew about the attack on Nancy Kerrigan.I forgave Tonya when she was accused by her ex-husband of plotting the attack.I forgave Tonya when she brandished a baseball bat at the driver of a car that did not turn right on a red light.I forgave Tonya for being found with a 9mm handgun and a shotgun after a gunshot brought police to her apartment.I forgave Tonya when she dropped out of school in the 10th grade.I even forgave Tonya for smoking.
NEWS
August 19, 1997
Scientists can believe in the Bible, tooI was offended by the Aug. 6 Opinion Commentary column by Barbara Yost, ''Martians, dinosaurs and scripture.'' Her generalizations of fundamental Christians and her demeaning of their beliefs show how little respect she has for them.She should not be surprised that there are people like Neal Larson, a paleontologist and Christian fundamentalist. There are many Christians who see the benefits and necessity of scientific discovery. But we also are aware of who has given us this wonderful world and universe to explore.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | October 30, 1990
LONDON -- In a day or two, the question before one of Her Majesty's Justices in the High Court of England will be: Does the working class exist any longer in these days of post-industrial affluence?The argument is between the richest and unlikeliest of litigants.Arguing that the working class is still with us is the Duke of Westminster, reputed to be Britain's wealthiest aristocrat.Asserting that the working class went into terminal decline when brightly illuminated shopping malls replaced yesteryear's "dark, satanic mills," is Lady Porter, heiress to a grocery fortune and leader of the Westminster City Council.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | January 12, 2004
ATLANTA - If his conservative critics (and Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman) are to be believed, Howard Dean is an out-of-touch lefty, a peacenik, a tax-and-spend liberal who believes in the nanny state. And if Dr. Dean becomes the Democratic nominee, President Bush will happily join the chorus to caricature him as an icon of the left-wing fringe. Dr. Dean may deserve some of the criticism. His careless rhetoric - he has hammered Bill Clinton and other Democratic centrists, for example, as "the Republican wing of the Democratic Party" - has given his rivals handy ammunition.
BUSINESS
By Mary Medland and Mary Medland,Special to The Sun | September 1, 1991
Although many Baltimore neighborhoods claim diversity, it's hard to imagine another area where differences are as visible as in Canton. In the past 20 years, Canton has gone from being a working-class neighborhood, driven by local canneries, Bethlehem Steel and a railroad, to a neighborhood whose waterfront is largely inhabited by well-heeled yuppies.This sudden change has sparked some tension.Critics charge that the newcomers are not committed to the city -- and certainly not to the public schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield's restless and moving "Putty Hill" is about a pocket of working-class Baltimoreans reacting to the overdose death of a 24-year-old man. It finds seductive underlying forms in what outsiders might consider shapeless lives. When skateboarders and BMXers streak up and down and over a course of concrete dips and valleys, and a teenager tags a wall with a spray-paint baroque version of "Rest in peace, Cody," they prove that they have poetry in them. The director doesn't impose his poetry on them.
NEWS
By Mary Rizzo | December 21, 2010
Hampden has become center stage — again — for debate about the image of Baltimore. In 2009 we had "flamingo-gate," and now, in the waning days of 2010, everyone is talking about the Hon trademark controversy. Denise Whiting, owner of Café Hon and the HonBar and creator of Hampden's annual HonFest, has decided to trademark the word "Hon," to limit and control its public, commercial use. Many people are angry, feeling that Ms. Whiting is laying claim to something that she has no right to own. (Others argue that while "hon" is a popular term in Baltimore, it's hardly unique to Charm City.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
Doug Ashton takes pride in Orchard Beach, his community of small homes and cottages nestled along northern Anne Arundel County's waterfront, where the laid-off construction superintendent has organized cleanups of shorelines sometimes littered with beer cans and other trash. Now Ashton is pushing to clean up his area's reputation as an outpost of the scrappy South Baltimore neighborhood of Curtis Bay, leading an effort for his community to get its own ZIP code. Orchard Beach is one of six waterfront communities of cottages and townhouses that recently banded together to lobby the U.S. Postal Service to officially recognize their communities; though they won't get their own ZIP codes, they'll soon be listed as independent postal destinations.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | July 15, 2010
The Great Recession is not only bringing hardship for millions of Americans but is widening the divide between two broad types of men and masculinity. If you want a window on how economic hard times — not only since 2008 but as inequality has grown during recent decades — has affected manhood, take a look at two movies: "Up in the Air" and "Capitalism: A Love Story." In the first, George Clooney is literally atop the world, well dressed, well paid, slickly sophisticated, and courtier of the equally upscale and driven Vera Farmiga.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
Just before flying to Europe to show his new film, "Putty Hill," at festivals in Copenhagen and Lisbon, Matt Porterfield acknowledged that he's taken aback whenever fans find his movies about Baltimore's white working class "so sad." Porterfield draws vital energy from his characters. "Their lives are so singular and surprising," he says. When reviewers or audiences point out how unusual Hamilton or Putty Hill are as movie settings, he thinks that speaks to the banality of other movies.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins , jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 5, 2009
Maryland might be holding up better than most states, but the deep national recession walloped rank-and-file workers on the lower end of the pay scale, according to a new report by two groups. The Progressive Maryland Education Fund and the Maryland Budget & Tax Policy Institute, which both focus on low- and moderate-income families, said in the study issued Friday that these Marylanders "represent the bulk of the job losses and foreclosures." Median wages fell last year for Marylanders without a bachelor's degree, including an 8 percent drop for those with some college education.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | March 27, 2006
ATLANTA -- The average American understands that soldiers who fought in Vietnam were unfairly blamed for a war they did not start, for lies they did not tell, for mismanaged battle plans they could not salvage. So we're determined not to make that mistake again. This time around, most of us salute our soldiers. Even determined peace activists, for the most part, are committed to two things - ending American involvement in Iraq and honoring the soldiers who volunteered to serve there. In a bitterly divided country, the vast majority of us agree that rank-and-file troops should not be held accountable for the politics that led to the overthrow of Saddam Hussein.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 29, 2004
Vera Drake spends her every waking moment doing for others, whether she's cleaning for the upper-class twits down the road, keeping her own family's spirits up or performing back-alley abortions for lower-class girls "in trouble." Writer-director Mike Leigh sees Vera as something of a saint, and there's certainly a noble, innate altruism to her that evokes compassion, if not admiration. We're made to feel sorry for her, if only because we see coming what she doesn't - the inevitable bad end. Vera Drake, Leigh's latest appreciation of the British working class and its bedrock morality, presents a severely stacked deck, even by his standards.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | July 2, 2009
Karl Malden, an Academy Award-winning actor who excelled in plain-spoken, working-class roles, including the awkward Mitch in A Streetcar Named Desire and a brave priest in On the Waterfront, died Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles. No cause of death was immediately disclosed. He was 97. Mr. Malden's bulbous nose and thinning hair made him one of the most familiar sights in movies and on television for five decades. In the 1970s, he became known to millions of viewers as a police veteran who partners with a young inspector played by Michael Douglas on the ABC drama series The Streets of San Francisco.
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