Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWorkforce Housing
IN THE NEWS

Workforce Housing

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 26, 2004
NATIONALLY AND locally, home-building companies -- often cast negatively in growth debates -- are now embracing significant aspects of the Smart Growth ethos. Somewhat ironically, that notable shift comes as the residential building industry enjoys very good times. In the unlikely case that you've missed it, home prices across the country, Maryland included, have soared this decade. But for all its benefits for homeowners and builders, the national housing boom has downsides. Middle-class workers and even two-income families increasingly are being priced out of their communities' housing markets, and this likely will accelerate with the anticipated rise in mortgage rates.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
Behind the asphalt parking lot at Dimitri's International Grille in Catonsville, the wooded area drops about 30 feet in a steep slope in one direction, adjoining Patapsco Valley State Park on two sides. The restaurant's owner wants to build 10 townhouses there, though zoning doesn't allow it and the Baltimore County planning staff has strongly recommended against it. "How do you develop on land like this?" said County Councilman Tom Quirk, pointing into the woods. He persuaded the council to revoke its approval of the project on Frederick Road, but a fellow lawmaker wants to put it back on track.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 8, 2006
ISSUE: An Annapolis alderman wants to amend an ordinance requiring developers to set aside "workforce housing" at new projects to allow nonprofit organizations to buy the homes, so that they in turn can sell or rent them to moderate-income residents. The program is now open to city residents, city employees and full-time teachers in city schools who meet income requirements. The amendment would allow nonprofits to buy from developers or from the zoning department, which may purchase homes designated for workforce housing if they have been on the market for 90 days.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
Construction is to begin this week on a $16.5 million apartment building at the southwest corner of Howard and Madison streets — one of the first residential projects to get under way on Baltimore's west side since the real estate slump began in 2008. The 74-unit building, called "M on Madison," is scheduled to open by August 2012 just south of Maryland General Hospital. The developer, HTA Development LLC of Columbia, is holding a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday. Public officials say the project is a "transit friendly," affordable development that will help energize the Howard Street corridor, which the city is seeking to revitalize with new housing, stores and offices.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- An Annapolis alderman wants to amend an ordinance requiring developers to set aside workforce housing at new projects to allow nonprofit organizations to buy the homes, so that they in turn can sell or rent them to moderate-income residents. The program is now open to city residents, city employees and full-time teachers in city schools who meet income requirements. But some worry that the amendment will lead to more renters instead of encouraging homeownership, and say the city instead should ease income requirements.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | March 15, 2006
Annapolis is moving to broaden access to an underutilized program that sets aside "workforce housing" at new and renovated residential developments. On Monday, the city council unanimously approved five amendments that members said would likely increase the number of eligible applicants. With the changes, school system staff and people who have worked in the city for at least a year will be eligible to apply for the set-aside units. The program has been open to qualified city residents and workers, including full-time teachers.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2004
When Ralph Greaves joined the Anne Arundel County police force in 1994, he figured he would keep his South Baltimore townhouse for a few years and then move his family to a nice place with a big yard close to work. But by the time Greaves began looking in 2002, the houses that he expected would cost $200,000 were selling for $300,000. That was too much. So Greaves looked at real estate listings in Harford and Carroll counties. Same story. He eventually bought a house on 1.5 acres for $209,000 - in Shrewsbury, Pa. "That's all that's out there anymore for the working stiff," Greaves said.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
Behind the asphalt parking lot at Dimitri's International Grille in Catonsville, the wooded area drops about 30 feet in a steep slope in one direction, adjoining Patapsco Valley State Park on two sides. The restaurant's owner wants to build 10 townhouses there, though zoning doesn't allow it and the Baltimore County planning staff has strongly recommended against it. "How do you develop on land like this?" said County Councilman Tom Quirk, pointing into the woods. He persuaded the council to revoke its approval of the project on Frederick Road, but a fellow lawmaker wants to put it back on track.
NEWS
July 23, 2006
Do more to create low-income housing The Sun is right to caution readers about the downside of Baltimore's recent housing boom ("The housing crunch," editorial, July 17). Although federal cuts in housing funds over the past 30 years are mostly responsible for the paucity of affordable housing, the skyrocketing private market continues to displace many lower-income residents. And while we support the recommendations of the Baltimore City Task Force on Inclusionary Zoning and Housing, they would do little to help low-wage workers and people with disabilities.
BUSINESS
By Bob Erle and Bob Erle,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
When Anne Arundel County firefighter paramedic Keith Whalen got married last year, he decided it was time to find a new home for his family. What he found were steep prices that he and his wife couldn't afford on their $80,000 combined salaries. "There is no way we can live in Anne Arundel County," Whalen said. Despite wanting to stay in the county in which he grew up, Whalen and his family chose Carroll County, where they recently built a $250,000 home in Taneytown. Moving so far from work - he said his commute, once five miles, is now 50 - has been an adjustment.
NEWS
January 27, 2011
The development battle reported by Arthur Hirsch ("Timonium-area housing plan fought," Jan. 24) exemplifies the poor legislation enacted by the prior Baltimore County Council when it modified the planned unit development (PUD) law. As Mr. Hirsch points out, "Under PUD rules, developers can build higher numbers of homes in exchange for a 'community benefit.'" A "community benefit" is defined as including one or more of the following four categories, that are loaded with administrative discretion, and allow very easy compliance for developers while making it very difficult for communities to oppose higher densities: The first is an "environmental benefit by proposing to achieve at least a silver rating according to the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Green Building Rating System or proposing residential structures that achieve at least a silver rating according to SNSI standards.
NEWS
July 23, 2006
Do more to create low-income housing The Sun is right to caution readers about the downside of Baltimore's recent housing boom ("The housing crunch," editorial, July 17). Although federal cuts in housing funds over the past 30 years are mostly responsible for the paucity of affordable housing, the skyrocketing private market continues to displace many lower-income residents. And while we support the recommendations of the Baltimore City Task Force on Inclusionary Zoning and Housing, they would do little to help low-wage workers and people with disabilities.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | March 15, 2006
Annapolis is moving to broaden access to an underutilized program that sets aside "workforce housing" at new and renovated residential developments. On Monday, the city council unanimously approved five amendments that members said would likely increase the number of eligible applicants. With the changes, school system staff and people who have worked in the city for at least a year will be eligible to apply for the set-aside units. The program has been open to qualified city residents and workers, including full-time teachers.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE: -- An Annapolis alderman wants to amend an ordinance requiring developers to set aside workforce housing at new projects to allow nonprofit organizations to buy the homes, so that they in turn can sell or rent them to moderate-income residents. The program is now open to city residents, city employees and full-time teachers in city schools who meet income requirements. But some worry that the amendment will lead to more renters instead of encouraging homeownership, and say the city instead should ease income requirements.
NEWS
March 8, 2006
ISSUE: An Annapolis alderman wants to amend an ordinance requiring developers to set aside "workforce housing" at new projects to allow nonprofit organizations to buy the homes, so that they in turn can sell or rent them to moderate-income residents. The program is now open to city residents, city employees and full-time teachers in city schools who meet income requirements. The amendment would allow nonprofits to buy from developers or from the zoning department, which may purchase homes designated for workforce housing if they have been on the market for 90 days.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2005
Several Anne Arundel leaders have taken unsuccessful cracks at creating affordable housing for the county's middle class workers, but now County Executive Janet S. Owens is taking her shot with a program that would assist government employees and their families. Under Owens' plan, announced as she proposed her budget for fiscal 2006 on Monday, the independent Housing Commission of Anne Arundel County would use bonds to buy homes and then lease them to county employees with family incomes between $60,000 and $80,000.
NEWS
January 27, 2011
The development battle reported by Arthur Hirsch ("Timonium-area housing plan fought," Jan. 24) exemplifies the poor legislation enacted by the prior Baltimore County Council when it modified the planned unit development (PUD) law. As Mr. Hirsch points out, "Under PUD rules, developers can build higher numbers of homes in exchange for a 'community benefit.'" A "community benefit" is defined as including one or more of the following four categories, that are loaded with administrative discretion, and allow very easy compliance for developers while making it very difficult for communities to oppose higher densities: The first is an "environmental benefit by proposing to achieve at least a silver rating according to the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Green Building Rating System or proposing residential structures that achieve at least a silver rating according to SNSI standards.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
Construction is to begin this week on a $16.5 million apartment building at the southwest corner of Howard and Madison streets — one of the first residential projects to get under way on Baltimore's west side since the real estate slump began in 2008. The 74-unit building, called "M on Madison," is scheduled to open by August 2012 just south of Maryland General Hospital. The developer, HTA Development LLC of Columbia, is holding a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday. Public officials say the project is a "transit friendly," affordable development that will help energize the Howard Street corridor, which the city is seeking to revitalize with new housing, stores and offices.
BUSINESS
By Bob Erle and Bob Erle,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
When Anne Arundel County firefighter paramedic Keith Whalen got married last year, he decided it was time to find a new home for his family. What he found were steep prices that he and his wife couldn't afford on their $80,000 combined salaries. "There is no way we can live in Anne Arundel County," Whalen said. Despite wanting to stay in the county in which he grew up, Whalen and his family chose Carroll County, where they recently built a $250,000 home in Taneytown. Moving so far from work - he said his commute, once five miles, is now 50 - has been an adjustment.
NEWS
September 26, 2004
NATIONALLY AND locally, home-building companies -- often cast negatively in growth debates -- are now embracing significant aspects of the Smart Growth ethos. Somewhat ironically, that notable shift comes as the residential building industry enjoys very good times. In the unlikely case that you've missed it, home prices across the country, Maryland included, have soared this decade. But for all its benefits for homeowners and builders, the national housing boom has downsides. Middle-class workers and even two-income families increasingly are being priced out of their communities' housing markets, and this likely will accelerate with the anticipated rise in mortgage rates.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.