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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
A group of state workforce agencies launched a new job search site Tuesday for "green" occupations in the region, saying that Maryland, Washington and Virginia have more than 230,000 workers involved in some aspect of environmental protection or natural resource conservation. The job listings site, marcgreenworks.com, has openings ranging from geologist to software engineer. The Mid-Atlantic Regional Collaborative, which created the site, is made up of state workforce leaders in Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Virginia.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
A few years ago, when Andrew Coy was a teacher at Digital Harbor High School, he offered his students a chance to learn Web design. He quickly realized those sorts of extracurricular activities were lacking, even at the tech-savvy institution in Federal Hill. Now Coy and a team at the Digital Harbor Foundation are working to create more of those opportunities for hundreds of students across the city each year. For the past year and a half, they've been doing it just blocks from Coy's old classroom, at a former city recreation center on Light Street.
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BUSINESS
Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore cyber security firm RedOwl Analytics plans to double its workforce to 50 people within the next few years as it tries to make Federal Hill Maryland's new technology hub, company CEO Guy Filippelli said Tuesday. Hot off securing $4.6 million during its first round of venture fundraising last month, RedOwl has also won praise from Gov. Martin O'Malley, who stopped by the company's Light Street headquarters to celebrate the start-up's success. O'Malley called the company an example of the "a growing ecosystem of innovation" in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Industry growth and a tide of employee retirements in Baltimore's transportation sector will create or leave open thousands of jobs by 2020, but local job seekers aren't prepared to fill them, according to a study released Monday by the Opportunity Collaborative. Low-income residents lack the needed technical training or have criminal records that make them ineligible for the jobs, according to the study by the coalition of state agencies, local governments, universities and nonprofits tasked with plotting a course toward sustainable economic growth for the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 11, 2011
Those of us who managed to hold onto our jobs through the four U.S. recessions since 1981 have grown used to seeing the workforce around us downsized, with human beings "outsourced" or replaced by machines and new technologies. We've also seen the economy bounce back and even expand, though our wages remained flat during most of that time. A couple of those recessions didn't do much permanent damage. But something's different now. With Friday's breathtaking government report noting only 18,000 new jobs in June after only 25,000 in May, with U.S. unemployment at 9.2 percent - and at least 8 percent for the last 28 months - you're allowed to wonder if we haven't entered an era of downsized permanence.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Owings Mills-based Medifast Inc. has laid off 24 employees, less than 3 percent of its 860-person workforce, over the past few weeks as the weight loss system company reviewed staffing levels, a spokeswoman said Wednesday. Medifast makes and sells portion-controlled weight-loss products and programs. "As Medifast continues to grow and evolve, the company periodically evaluates overall efficiency," said Renee Beck, the spokeswoman, in an email. "Over the last few weeks, the company reviewed expertise and staffing levels across the organization to best achieve strategic initiatives…Medifast continues to focus on profitable growth moving forward.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
I'm old enough to remember the 1986 amnesty for undocumented immigrants ("Citizen status is seen for millions," Jan. 28). I recall it was guaranteed never to happen again and the matter was settled. Now, nearly three decades later, we're back at square one. Millions apparently will be pardoned and soon wending their way to citizenship. I was surprised by Vice President Joe Biden's recent comment at this month's congressional swearing in ceremony. He stated that the Latinos "are the center of the future of this nation.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Since 1899, the Coast Guard's shipyard at Curtis Bay has added years to the life of the sea-battered fleet, repairing and upgrading hundreds of cutters before sending them back on patrol. So in 2002 when shipyard officials looked at the future and saw a graying workforce with an average age of 47, they crafted a rejuvenation plan based on nurturing home-grown talent. The trades training program they created has placed 125 students and graduates in the Curtis Bay workforce, which numbers 625. The apprentices receive not just trades training but college credits.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bodensiek | April 8, 2014
The Maryland legislature last week passed a 2015 budget, and it includes $12 million to help create jobs in Maryland's innovative biotech and life science sector. That's a smart use of resources. For lawmakers looking to put residents back to work, our state's high-tech sectors have been bright spots - especially our vanguard biotech industry, which accounts for more than 11 percent of the Maryland economy. In Baltimore, Emergent Technologies is now staffing 200 new workers; this year, Montgomery County's Precision for Medicine will add 170 to the rolls; and in 2011, Frederick-based Life Technologies hired 100 people.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Human Genome Sciences Inc., which was acquired for $3.6 billion by London-based GlaxoSmithKline Plc in August, intends to lay off 97 employees in mid-December, and an additional but unspecified number of cuts are planned for next year, the company warned Maryland labor regulators this week. The Rockville-based biopharmaceuticals company, which employed as many as 1,000 people up until the acquisition, is in the process of integrating with GSK, a spokesman said. Previously, the company disclosed in September it would cut 114 positions by the end of this month.
NEWS
Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Nearly three-quarters of Americans say they have trust in federal employees , a spike in public confidence that some are attributing to last year's partial government shutdown. In a recent Battleground Poll by George Washington University, 22 percent of registered voters surveyed said they had "a lot" of confidence in federal workers , and 51 percent said they had "some. " The public's confidence in the federal workforce waned in 2012 and 2013 after scandals involving the Internal Revenue Service and the General Services Administration but rebounded after the shutdown last October.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Christino Jackson Jr. has had steady work for the past seven years — mostly as a temp. Jobs working construction, building fences, or helping plumbers and electricians — all for a temporary help agency — have meant stability for the 36-year-old Baltimore resident. "I know that I'm going to have work," said Jackson, an employee of Just Temps who is trained as a mason and currently is working on a residential rehabilitation project along North Calvert and St. Paul streets.
BUSINESS
Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore cyber security firm RedOwl Analytics plans to double its workforce to 50 people within the next few years as it tries to make Federal Hill Maryland's new technology hub, company CEO Guy Filippelli said Tuesday. Hot off securing $4.6 million during its first round of venture fundraising last month, RedOwl has also won praise from Gov. Martin O'Malley, who stopped by the company's Light Street headquarters to celebrate the start-up's success. O'Malley called the company an example of the "a growing ecosystem of innovation" in Maryland.
NEWS
By Sheldon Caplis and Diane Bell McKoy | June 9, 2014
America is facing three pivotal points in its history: a workforce vacated by Baby Boomer retirements, a lack of teachers to prepare youth for college and give them the skills required for new and global economies, and a swiftly changing racial demographic (becoming "majority-minority" before the end of this decade). How we navigate these issues is critical. They impact whether we as a state will be able to meet our leadership and workforce needs and whether we will have teachers with the skills and cultural understanding of the communities they serve, which include a growing population of children of color and those living in under-resourced areas.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Latinos have for years made up one of the largest and fastest-growing groups in the country. They have also long been one of the most underrepresented minority groups in the federal workplace. Now a new effort is underway - at the highest level of federal hiring - to address that disparity. "There is tremendous growth, as you know, in the Latino community, and we see more and more young people graduating from university, and I really want to tap into those numbers," said Katherine Archuleta, the director of the federal Office of Personnel Management.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
As an advocate for returning citizens, I can truly say Monday was a great day for the city of Baltimore. For individuals to finally be judged by their merits, work experience and skill, gives individuals hope ( "Council passes 'Ban the Box' legislation," April 29). The business community will benefit greatly from an untapped labor force - a labor force that is comprised of extraordinarily dedicated workers. When individuals with a criminal background are given a chance in the workforce, they are the first to arrive and the last to leave because they are grateful that someone thought enough about them to give them an opportunity.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Fort Meade, home to the National Security Agency, the Defense Information Systems Agency, U.S. Cyber Command and other key organizations, was a net winner in the 2005 round of base realignment. With 52,000 service members, civilians and contractors, the Army installation in Anne Arundel County is the largest workplace in Maryland. But by the time Army Col. Edward C. Rothstein took command, military spending was beginning to tighten again. Rothstein's tenure as garrison commander, overseeing security and emergency services, public works and construction, family care, morale and well-being programs, coincided with the government-wide spending cuts known as the sequester and furloughs.
NEWS
By Douglas A. Beigel | April 22, 2014
A health care crisis is quietly unfolding in our nation's laboratories. This crisis has developed largely off the public's radar screen. If not resolved, it can adversely impact the lives of every American. The crisis in question: alarming shortages within the laboratory workforce. Lab testing has an estimated impact on over 70 percent of medical decisions. That percentage will grow as baby boomers retire and preventive coverage - including screening tests performed by labs - increases as part of federal health care reform.
NEWS
By Douglas A. Beigel | April 22, 2014
A health care crisis is quietly unfolding in our nation's laboratories. This crisis has developed largely off the public's radar screen. If not resolved, it can adversely impact the lives of every American. The crisis in question: alarming shortages within the laboratory workforce. Lab testing has an estimated impact on over 70 percent of medical decisions. That percentage will grow as baby boomers retire and preventive coverage - including screening tests performed by labs - increases as part of federal health care reform.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bodensiek | April 8, 2014
The Maryland legislature last week passed a 2015 budget, and it includes $12 million to help create jobs in Maryland's innovative biotech and life science sector. That's a smart use of resources. For lawmakers looking to put residents back to work, our state's high-tech sectors have been bright spots - especially our vanguard biotech industry, which accounts for more than 11 percent of the Maryland economy. In Baltimore, Emergent Technologies is now staffing 200 new workers; this year, Montgomery County's Precision for Medicine will add 170 to the rolls; and in 2011, Frederick-based Life Technologies hired 100 people.
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