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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - The United Food and Commercial Workers Union is planning a new campaign to win over more than 1 million employees at Wal-Mart Stores Inc., after several failures to organize the largest retailer. On Thursday, the UFCW, the AFL-CIO, the National Organization for Women, the National Baptist Convention and the National Interfaith Committee for Worker Justice will stage protests outside 100 Wal-Mart stores. "We've never gone at any other company like we're going to go at Wal-Mart," Doug Dority, international president of the food and commercial workers' union, said at a news conference.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
The Samuel Adams Brewhouse at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport has closed, effective Wednesday, resulting in 15 employees losing their jobs. The restaurant was operated by Creative Food Group, a subtenant of AirMall USA, which leases space to concessions operators at the airport. Roger Schwandtner, a CFG spokesman, said the company's lease had expired, and that traffic at the restaurant - which was in the main terminal outside security checkpoints - was low, especially following recent changes made to some of the airport's concourse entrances.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1994
The U.S. Labor Department has sued Towson-based Local 27 of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, saying the incumbent management of the local failed to give ballots to all members during last year's disputed election of officers.The five-page complaint, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, asks the court to throw out Tom Russow's re-election last October as president of the 26,000-member local.Mr. Russow won the election by 187 votes, said John Singleton, an attorney for Concerned Union Brothers and Sisters, sponsors of the dissident slate.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Union leaders representing 28,000 Giant Food and Safeway workers reached a tentative agreement with both supermarket chains on a new labor contract, which will be presented to members Dec. 17 for a vote. A collective bargaining agreement for Local 400 and Local 27 of the United Food & Commercial Workers would take effect immediately if approved, union leaders said. The impact of health reform on workers' health coverage had been the biggest sticking point in negotiations, union leaders have said.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | July 22, 1991
Ethel Beaudoin, a stitcher for 30 years at John Roberts Clothing Co. in Biddeford, Maine, liked her work so much that in June she bought the company.Not by herself, of course. Beaudoin, also president of Local 667A, Amalgamated Clothing Textile Workers Union, is a founder of a new workers' corporation that saved the bankrupt company and the jobs of its 170 garment workers, 90 percent of them women.The takeover plans leave management in place, but union members such as Beaudoin are co-owners and members of the board under an employee stock ownership plan that takes effect at the end of the year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | April 3, 2007
Gladys D. Greene, a retired president of an aircraft electrical workers union who once said the "best social program is a job and the best job is an aerospace job," died of septic shock Saturday at Harbor Hospital. The Mount Winans resident was 82. Born Gladys Delores Boone on a farm that was later developed into the Cherry Hill neighborhood, she attended segregated, four-room Mount Winans Elementary School, which she called "the cheesebox." She completed Harvey Johnson Junior High School.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
Cipriano Ferrel, 46, founder of Oregon's only farm workers union, died of an apparent heart attack Wednesday in Salem, Ore. He was the former president of Northwest Treeplanters and Farm Workers United, which represents more than 2,000 farm workers. He also co-founded the Willamette Valley Immigration Project, a precursor to the union.James Kingsley, 66, a longtime reporter for the Commercial Appeal in Memphis, Tenn., who often reported scoops about Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and other music stars, died in Memphis of emphysema Friday.
NEWS
December 21, 1997
Esther E. Peterson,91, a pioneering advocate of worker and consumer rights in three presidential administrations, died yesterday at her Washington home.She was a pioneer in pressing the food and grocery industries to include unit pricing, more complete lists of ingredients and freshness dating, a son, Iver Peterson, said. A native of Provo, Utah, she was an official of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union and the AFL-CIO before being named director of the Women's Bureau and assistant secretary for labor standards at the Labor Department by President Kennedy in 1961.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | February 27, 1995
NEW YORK -- As Seventh Avenue's leading designers prepare for the glitz of spring Fashion Week, undercover federal agents are ready to blitz the industry's underbelly.Probing a side of the fashion world far from the paparazzi's flashes, agents are preparing bribery charges against union officials and fashion executives for allegedly circumventing contributions to union workers' health care.The arrests will mark the latest attack in a two-year investigation into corruption in New York City's Garment District.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2004
The president of the Metropolitan Baltimore Council of AFL-CIO Unions was arrested at a Safeway supermarket in North Baltimore yesterday during a protest arranged to demonstrate solidarity between local unions and supermarket workers in California who have been locked out or on strike since October. Ernest R. Grecco was arrested as representatives of about 20 local unions picketed outside a Safeway store in the 4400 block of Harford Road. Grecco bought groceries in the store using pennies to pay. The penny purchase annoyed a shopper, and police removed Grecco from the store and handcuffed him. The Baltimore union members gathered at the supermarket to show support for about 70,000 members of the United Food and Commercial Workers union who have been on strike or locked out since Oct. 11. Health care coverage is the main issue in the dispute between supermarket workers and Safeway, Albertsons Inc. and Kroger Co., owner of Ralphs.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
Several hundred former Sparrows Point workers gathering late Monday afternoon for details of their steel mill's demise heard from union leaders that at least two groups had wanted to restart the plant but weren't given the chance. Joe Rosel, president of United Steelworkers Local 9477 in Sparrows Point, told the crowd that Sherman International, an iron and steel equipment supplier in Pittsburgh, wanted to operate the plant and tried to bid $150 million for it last week. "They were told they couldn't bid because the plant wasn't for sale anymore," Rosel said.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Advocates for a host of Maryland interests — from the Chesapeake Bay to the defense industry — said Wednesday they are anxiously watching whether the election will change the political landscape here despite early indications that it probably won't. A divided Congress will remain in place come January, and lawmakers wasted little time in disagreeing about the meaning of President Barack Obama's victory. Both Democrats and Republicans claimed mandates from voters and signaled that they will hold firm on positions that have led to gridlock in the past.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Shoppers Food & Pharmacy workers at some Maryland and Virginia stores have filed unfair labor practice charges against the grocer, accusing store managers of retaliating against workers whose union is negotiating a labor contract. Members of United Food & Commercial Workers Local 400, which represents more than 2,000 employees of stores in northern Virginia and in Maryland south of Baltimore, filed the case last week with the National Labor Relations Board. The union said managers have stopped workers from discussing the contract talks with customers and have harassed them off the clock in an attempt to intimidate employees into accepting a contract that includes deep wage and benefit concessions.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
The United Steelworkers reported Thursday that its members had ratified a new contract with RG Steel, which bought Sparrows Point and two other steel mills earlier this year in a $1.2 billion deal. About 57 percent of the hourly production, maintenance, office and clerical employees at the three facilities — which also include the Wheeling Pittsburgh Steel facility in the Ohio Valley and the former W.C.I. Steel facility in Warren, Ohio — voted for the contract. Mountain State Carbon in Follansbee, W.Va.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
William Frank Hauhn, a retired electrician, died June 7 of undetermined causes at his Cape St. Claire home. He was 91. Mr. Hauhn was born in Baltimore and raised near Patterson Park and North Avenue. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Hauhn became an electrician and worked building ships during World War II at Bethlehem Steel Corp. From 1950 until retiring in 1982, Mr. Hauhn, who was a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 26, worked out of his union's hiring hall.
NEWS
By John Reid | April 27, 2010
As Baltimore City officials scramble to close a $121 million budget deficit, they seem to face nothing but hard choices. Tai Watts can relate. Ms. Watts is a full-time nurse's aide at Baltimore's University Specialty Hospital whose take-home pay is less than $1,500 a month. She grew up in Baltimore, but she worries about finding a safe neighborhood for her 14-year old daughter, so she pays more than $1,000 a month in rent and utilities for an apartment in Essex. Each month, Ms. Watts and her daughter have less than $500 to cover food, clothing and transportation.
NEWS
January 26, 1992
The American Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO, has announced its endorsement of the re-election of Rep. Beverly B. Byron, D-6th.The APWUis the largest postal union in the world, with 360,000 members. Its endorsement is the first formal declaration of organizational supportin the March 3 primary."I'm pleased with the continued endorsement of the American Postal Workers," Byron said. "It says that working people are in basic agreement with my views and voting record in Congress. I value their trust and support."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | October 1, 1993
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. stock closed down nearly 5 percent yesterday in selling analysts attributed to concerns about imminent labor talks with the United Auto Workers union.The share price also was hurt by portfolio managers cutting their positions on the last day of the quarter, analysts said.GM, the day's most actively traded U.S. issue, closed down $2.125 a share, at $41.75, on New York Stock Exchange volume of 7.8 million, almost four times the stock's three-month daily average.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
In principle, the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees has an excellent argument for the so-called "fair share" law that went into effect in Maryland this week. It negotiates contracts for tens of thousands of state employees, whether they are members of the union or not. Conducting those negotiations costs money, and it isn't right that nonmembers get the benefits without paying their share of the costs. But the potential side effects of the law are cause for concern.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 23, 2008
Ronald Edward Hollie, the retired president of a hospital workers union and a stationary engineer, died of cancer Sunday at Sinai Hospital. The Cheswolde resident was 71. Born in Baltimore and raised on Pine Street, he attended St. Pius V Parochial School and attended Carver Vocational Technical High School. He later earned a General Education degree and took courses at Dundalk Community College. He served in the Marine Corps from 1957 to 1960. He then worked as a licensed stationary engineer at Johns Hopkins Hospital, where his beginning salary was $35 a week, his family said.
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