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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
David Blum, a Baltimore workers' compensation lawyer who was also legal counsel to several unions, died in his sleep Monday at his Pikesville home. He was 57. Mr. Blum had been recuperating from recent neck surgery, said his wife of 29 years, the former Natalie Sanders. The cause of death is pending. Mr. Blum, who was born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville, graduated from Pikesville High School in 1966. He earned a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1970 from New York University and a law degree in 1973 from the University of Maryland School of Law. He was admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1973, and clerked for Judge Albert W. Menchine of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Chesapeake Employers' Insurance Co. has some long-standing policyholders — 96 years, in one case. That happens when you date to the infancy of your industry. The Towson-based workers' compensation insurer — a century old this year — was created by Maryland legislators as they instituted a system to help injured employees and compensate the families of those who die in workplace accidents. States across the country were doing the same in rapid succession. Chesapeake Employers was called the State Accident Fund then, and it was a government agency.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
Philip T. McCusker, a retired workers' compensation attorney and musician, died of heart failure Monday at his Pikesville home. He was 82. Born in Baltimore, Mr. McCusker was a lifelong resident of Pikesville, where his family had lived since before the Civil War. One of seven children, he was raised on Walker Avenue. He was a 1939 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School, then in downtown Baltimore. Influenced by his father, Joseph O'C. McCusker, a lawyer and longtime chief deputy state comptroller, he earned a law degree from the University of Baltimore Law School.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Police officers rushed into the downtown parking garage, weapons drawn. As Detective Anthony Fata sat bleeding from a leg wound, officers scrambled around corners and up stairwells, frantically searching for a "junkie-looking black male. " The decorated 14-year veteran who'd made the emergency call - Signal 13: Officer Down - told of a violent struggle in which he was shot at close range. He also said that he had fallen down a flight of stairs while unloading his .40-caliber Glock, dislocating a shoulder.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1995
ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Workers Compensation Commission is facing a fiscal crunch so severe that it may shut down the agency by this spring, commission Chairman Charles Krysiak warned legislators yesterday.Speaking before a subcommittee of the state Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, Mr. Krysiak warned he won't be able to ensure payments to injured workers if the state doesn't restore 12 computer-related jobs scheduled to be phased out by the end of the fiscal year in June."If we don't get some relief soon, we could literally close the agency," Mr. Krysiak said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
Charles J. Krysiak, retired chairman of the Maryland Workers' Compensation Commission who represented a Southeast Baltimore district in the legislature for the better part of two decades, died of liver disease Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 67. Born in Fells Point, he was a graduate of Holy Rosary Parochial School and worked in area drugstores to put himself through Loyola High School, where he was a 1955 graduate. He earned a bachelor's degree from Loyola College and a law degree from the University of Maryland School of Law. He went into law practice with George Hofferbert, who was long a figure in east-side politics.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF Sun reporter Joan Jacobson contributed to this article | July 16, 1998
A 43-year-old Owings Mills woman faces trial next week on charges of stealing $103,921 from Baltimore County government in fraudulent workers' compensation checks.Sandra Ann Callis, a temporary employee who worked for a year for a Pennsylvania company contracted to handle the county's workers' compensation cases, could get up to 15 years in prison if convicted on two felony theft counts covering a period between July 1997 and December 1997.According to a police report, an employee at PMA Management Corp.
NEWS
March 25, 2010
F irefighters have a dangerous job. Not only do they face the immediate peril that comes from running into burning buildings, but long-term exposure to known carcinogens that can be inhaled or absorbed while battling fires also raises their risk of cancer. However, legislation pending in the General Assembly goes too far in compensating firefighters for this risk. The measure would rewrite workers' compensation law to the point that most cancers would be presumed to be the result of on-the-job environmental exposure.
BUSINESS
By Alyssa Gabbay and Alyssa Gabbay,Special to The Sun | December 2, 1991
When an employee suffered a major illness or injury five or 10 years ago, the employer's attitude was usually simple: Let him go. Workers' compensation or disability insurance would provide income, and the employer wouldn't have to worry about modifying his job or otherwise fitting him back into the workplace.Times have changed. The costs of workers' compensation and other types of disability insurance are soaring. American employers forked over about $60 billion in workers' comp expenses last year, double the amount spent in 1985.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
When Vernell Harris hurt her back last year dragging an infested, 45-pound box of detergent out of a Howard County school cafeteria, more than roaches came out. Her workers' compensation claim and eventual court-ordered award opened a new chapter in Maryland labor law. Labor and insurance executives are divided on how much impact the change will have. The Harris case and its repercussions are gaining attention in Annapolis this winter. Representatives for state employers, businesses and insurers are seeking relief from the legislature, while labor advocates contend that the Harris ruling puts Maryland's 2.5 million workers in line with those in most other states.
NEWS
Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
In October 2012, a Baltimore City firefighter was caught in a sudden burst of flames, suffering burns to his head, neck, shoulder, face and hand, according to a summary provided by the city. The firefighter has since won a workers' compensation award that the city anticipates will total $624,0000, making it the costliest claim filed by a city employee in the last fiscal year, records show. All told, the city expects to pay more than $35 million for 3,700 claims, with the bulk compensating for lost wages, medical bills and permanent physical injury.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Facing criticism from Baltimore and nearby counties over high drug bills, doctors who prescribe marked-up medication under Maryland's workers' compensation system have proposed capping their prescription fees. But the doctors' proposal would allow them to charge up to between 130 and 150 percent of pharmacy rates for drugs, plus a $12 fee for each prescription and a 20 percent penalty if counties don't pay — legislation that, if passed, municipalities say would cost them millions of dollars more than what pharmacies charge for pills.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
Darnerien McCants, a former wide receiver for the Washington Redskins, can pursue workers' compensation benefits in Maryland for injuries he sustained during games and practices in other states, Maryland's highest court ruled Thursday. The unanimous decision comes on the heels of a related ruling Wednesday in a case involving another former Redskins player. The Court of Appeals allowed Tom Tupa, who had been a punter for the Virginia-based team, to obtain workers' compensation benefits for a career-ending injury suffered in 2005 during warm-ups before a home game at FedEx Field in Landover.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2012
When workers get hurt on the job more are getting their medication directly from their doctors, rather than from a pharmacy, according to a new study. It may be easier for the patient to have the doctor dispense drugs, but it is driving up costs for employers, according to the study by the Workers Compensation Research Institute. The prices paid to physicians is generally higher than that paid to pharmacies, the study found. The cost of Vicodin quadruples when dispensed by physicians compared to the pharmacy.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
Over the past seven months, Jheri Stratton has been quarantined in her house for a while, ordered to wear a mask to walk her dog, and monitored twice a week by a city Health Department official who watches to ensure that she swallows a handful of pills. She has had to cancel vacations and explain to friends why she can't go out. Since the former waitress at Hooters in downtown Baltimore was diagnosed with active tuberculosis in November, allegedly after she and others contracted the disease from a manager at the Harborplace restaurant, her life has been miserable, Stratton said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
The Washington Redskins urged Maryland's highest court Thursday not to force the team to pay workers' compensation benefits to its former wide receiver Darnerien McCants, arguing that the claim involving his injuries belongs in Virginia, where the NFL team is based. "There's no question that by far, the bulk of his work activities occurred in Virginia," David O. Godwin, a lawyer for the football team told the Court of Appeals, saying that the team offices and training facilities are in Ashburn, Va., and that McCants is "forum-shopping" for benefits.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2005
Workers' compensation payments grew nearly three times faster in Maryland than the national average in 2003, according to a report released yesterday by the National Academy of Social Insurance. Payments for injured workers in Maryland grew 9.4 percent to $628.5 million in 2003, compared with 3.2 percent growth to $54.9 billion in payments across the nation in 2003, the most recent figures available. Meanwhile, the cost to employers for workers' compensation nationwide continued to outstrip medical and cash benefits to injured workers, the study found.
NEWS
March 25, 2010
F irefighters have a dangerous job. Not only do they face the immediate peril that comes from running into burning buildings, but long-term exposure to known carcinogens that can be inhaled or absorbed while battling fires also raises their risk of cancer. However, legislation pending in the General Assembly goes too far in compensating firefighters for this risk. The measure would rewrite workers' compensation law to the point that most cancers would be presumed to be the result of on-the-job environmental exposure.
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