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NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | June 19, 1991
ADELPHI -- The University of Maryland Board of Regents today mandated a 40-hour work week for about 5,262 classified employees of the UM system.The vote drew protests from more than 300 workers who picketed the board throughout a committee meeting and heckled and hissed at the regents.One regent, Constance Unseld, voted against the 40-hour work week resolution. She received a two-minute standing ovation from the workers.Vice Chairman Roger Blount, who voted for the resolution, refused to comment.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Beautiful early fall weather is forecast to continue Wednesday, with temperatures in the lower to mid-70s, dry air and mostly sunny skies. Overnight lows were forecast in the upper 50s and lower 60s, rising to the mid-70s by the afternoon. Mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies are expected. Dew points are forecast in the upper 40s and lower 50s, making the air feel dry and cool. Similar weather is forecast through the end of the work week, with overnight lows dropping colder, into the 50s and 40s outside the city.
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NEWS
December 27, 1996
SEEKING MORE work out of public employees is one way that Anne Arundel County Executive John Gary hopes to hold down payroll costs, which account for about three-quarters of county government's budget. Requiring all employees to work a 40-hour week has been a key element in his effort, but the new rule has created friction among some.Last summer, unions representing part of the county workforce negotiated contracts in which the employees' base pay assumed continuation of a 35-hour week. At the time, the county code said that any employees whose work week was extended to 40 hours would be entitled to a 14 percent raise to cover the additional hours.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Cloudy skies, slight storm chances and highs in the mid-80s are forecast Monday as cool air moves into the region for the week. Mostly cloudy skies are forecast throughout the day. Some isolated storms could pop up as a front moves through. On the other side of the front is cool, dry air expected to make for an unseasonably cool week. Highs Tuesday are forecast in the upper 70s, with highs in the lower 80s the rest of the week. Lows are forecast in the lower 60s. Dew points are forecast in the 50s, making the air feel dry. Mostly sunny skies are forecast Tuesday through the end of the work week.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
Nearly three out of four women are not getting eight hours or more of sleep per night during the work week. Two-thirds say sleeplessness causes problems in their relationships, and 27 percent say it hurts their job performance. - National Sleep Foundation
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
Unions representing state workers plan to seek legislation to overturn Gov. William Donald Schaefer's executive order increasing to 40 hours the work week of about 40,000 public employees.The order, issued last week and effective next month, increases the current 35 1/2 -hour work week for many state workers. Schaefer said the longer work week was needed to balance the state budget without laying off workers -- something he had threatened to do late last year in response to the unexpected revenue shortfall.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns and Michael K. Burns,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 3, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- State-employee unions argued yesterday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that the governor's order establishing a standard 40-hour work week violates the separation of powers and the state's contract with its employees.The governor's order goes into effect July 10, extending by 48 minutes the work day of nearly 40,000 state employees who have traditionally worked a 35 1/2 -hour week.Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. promised to decide by then whether to grant the union request to block the order.
NEWS
July 10, 1991
Despite the grousing and inconvenience caused by the extra 4 1/2 hours Gov. William Donald Schaefer ordered 40,000 state workers to put in every week, "Schaefer time" is actually a blessing in disguise. Without these added work hours, the governor would probably have to fire at least 4,000 employees to balance the budget.Layoffs may still happen if employee unions win their court suit seeking to overturn the longer work week. They lost yesterday at the circuit court level and are appealing the decision to the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
July 2, 2010
For a solution to the problem of excessive overtime pay costs in Baltimore City, we need only review a bit of history. The Fair Labor Standards Act passed in 1937 was a job-creation technique. It established the 40-hour work week with penalty pay, also known as overtime pay, for hours worked over 40, weekends, holidays, and so on. This was a time of heavy unemployment. The hope was that by limiting working hours, more people would be employed. The health benefits of a more reasonable work week were incidental, but considered.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
I find it hard to believe that the chief of the Baltimore City fire department wants to bring back the 56 hour work week ("Baltimore fire chief floats workforce reduction, more hours," March 22). This would be a disservice to the loyal men and women of the department. A 56-hour work week entails four 14-hour nights of continuous runs on medic units that respond to 6,000-8,000 calls each annually. This is extremely irresponsible and dangerous not only for the weary rescue workers but also for the patients.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
Given the size of the audience for this blog, it's legitimate to call a dozen responses a groundswell. Several of you have expressed your appreciation of the weekly video joke and deplored, if not mourned, its passing.  It was conceived in a conversation with Mary Corey, the late editor of The Sun , as a Monday lagniappe, a little boost for the start of the work week, and those of you who have followed it evidently got some boost from...
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Morgan State's aerial attack has been grounded for most of the season. But that unit could find success against this Saturday's opponent. North Carolina Central (3-3 overall and 1-1 in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) is ranked 11th among the 11 pass defenses in the league. Opponents have averaged 271.0 yards and scored 11 touchdowns through the air against the Eagles, who are also last in the league in sacks with seven. On the flipside, the Bears (1-5, 1-1) have struggled mightily thus far, ranking 10th in pass offense with a 122.5-yard average and just seven scores.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
Mostly cloudy skies and high temperatures in the lower 80s are forecast in the Baltimore area Tuesday. The morning was forecast to start around 60 degrees, much warmer than the typical upper 40s to lower 50s this time of year. The afternoon high is also above normal, closer to the average for late August, though humidity is expected to be much lower than in late summer. Dew points are forecast in the mid- to upper-50s, making the air feel less crisp than it has been in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The Rawlings-Blake administration and Baltimore's fire unions are battling over the city's proposal to require firefighters to work longer hours — 24 hours straight, every three days. The mayor says the move — which mirrors staffing trends in other large U.S. cities — will save millions for cash-strapped Baltimore while giving its 1,300 firefighters a huge pay raise by creating a longer work week. The fire unions, however, say the move would represent a cut to their hourly pay and is unfair to employees who have built their lives around a work schedule that's been in place for 20 years.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake called Monday for "bold reforms" to fix a looming financial shortfall, including requiring more city workers to contribute to their retirement fund, charging residents for trash collection, asking firefighters to work longer hours and cutting the city workforce by 10 percent over time. In return, she said, the city could use the savings to raise employee salaries and cut property taxes by 22 percent - 50 cents per $100 of assessed value - over the next decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Effective Tuesday, Bel-Loc Diner in Parkville has discontinued its dinner service. The Parkville diner will now be open for breakfast and lunch only, from 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The diner has been open since 1964. Greg's Bagels in Belvedere Square is going to a five-day week.  In a Bagel Alert posted at the store, the owners, Greg and Kathy Novik, wrote, "After 24 years of working 6 days a week ... we no longer have the physical strength and endurance to continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Effective Tuesday, Bel-Loc Diner in Parkville has discontinued its dinner service. The Parkville diner will now be open for breakfast and lunch only, from 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The diner has been open since 1964. Greg's Bagels in Belvedere Square is going to a five-day week.  In a Bagel Alert posted at the store, the owners, Greg and Kathy Novik, wrote, "After 24 years of working 6 days a week ... we no longer have the physical strength and endurance to continue.
NEWS
March 1, 1995
FROM an eternal optimist (and an addicted fan) comes this bit of advice on the sad saga of baseball's ridiculous strike:"Baltimoreans miss baseball. They miss watching it and talking about it. They even miss complaining about it."That's not to say Baltimore isn't complaining."Fans have one thing to say to both sides of the issue. Owners and players, wake up! Get your act together!"Hey owners, what more do you want? Fans are willing to pay astronomical ticket prices for their baseball, $5 for hot dogs and $4 for cokes -- if you come back soon.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The Ravens are scheduled to land here this afternoon. By watching the footage of the San Francisco 49ers' arrival last night and then by attending their news conferences, I was a little surprised how nonchalant and business-like they were. It fits coach Jim Harbaugh's desire to treat this like a normal work week. I don't see that as a good or bad thing, mind you. I was just a little surprised that you didn't see players walking off the plane in fancy suits with video cameras pressed to their faces.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
In his recent commentary, Matt Patterson informed us that President Barack Obama's election to a second term in office is the death knell for liberty in this country and he sounds ready to pack up his bags and leave ("America the dictatorship?" Nov. 27). Fine. But before he goes, perhaps we should take a moment to compare and contrast Mr. Patterson's golden age of a free America (which he defines as prior to the passage of the 16th Amendment in 1913) with the Orwellian present in which we now live.
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