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October 11, 2010
3rd and long in NFL Bill Kline The Morning Call The NBA and its players have issues, but don't expect a work stoppage. Commissioner David Stern has the magic touch. But as sure as another sack of Jay Cutler, you can bet there will be no NFL next September. Owners want an 18-game schedule and a bigger cut of the revenue. Also out there like an uncovered wide receiver is the idea of a rookie wage scale. The players not only won't accept a pay cut, they'll want even more money if the league goes to 18 games.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
When a three-day strike by local longshoremen forced the 718-foot CCNI Antofagasta to sail out of the port of Baltimore without unloading its container cargo, the effects rippled across the country and overseas. Several shipping lines scrambled to reroute dozens of Baltimore-bound containers north again after the ship brought them back to Cartagena, Colombia, according to documents obtained from the Maryland Port Administration through a Maryland Public Information Act request. Chicago customers expecting to reuse Antofagasta containers emptied in Baltimore instead had to order them by rail from Savannah, Ga. The Antofagasta burned nearly 40,000 tons of additional fuel to make up for lost time and arrive on schedule at the Panama Canal.
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
The Maryland Lottery said Wednesday it plans to release the newest Baltimore Ravens-themed lottery ticket in August, but that is dependent on the resolution of the National Football League's lockout. The ticket will offer more than $11.2 million in cash prizes, including six opportunities to win $250,000. Other "second-chance" winnings will include a $1 million cash prize, season tickets for life, season tickets in 2012, game-day premium seats, an away trip with the team, a Ravens-themed "man cave," a Ravens hospitality tent for 30 people and autographed helmets and other prizes.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
The region's Red Cross chapter says the union representing 50 employees involved in blood drive operations has threatened to strike next Friday if a new contract is not reached. Teamsters Local 311 sent a letter of intent to the Greater Chesapeake and Potomac Blood Services Region warning of a work stoppage, an action the nonprofit agency labeled "irresponsible" and a potential disruption to blood collection operations to aid areas ravaged by Superstorm Sandy. The local, chartered in 1952 and headquartered in Baltimore, did not return requests for comment.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2006
Sergio Vargas won't lay bricks at his construction firm today. Rosa Gauman will not change bedsheets at a downtown hotel. And loyal customers hoping to savor the mole sauce at Arcos, a Mexican restaurant in Upper Fells Point, will have to wait until tomorrow. Immigrant workers nationwide have threatened to turn today - International Workers' Day - into a display of defiance with a work stoppage and boycott to symbolize the reliance of the U.S. economy on immigrant labor. In doing so, they will call for reform that would guarantee a path to U.S. citizenship for the nation's estimated 11 million illegal immigrants.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2002
Major-league baseball players earn an average salary of about $2.4 million for a six-month season, but they are talking about going on strike. The Boston Red Sox franchise recently sold for nearly $700 million, but baseball management insists that the game is awash in red ink and headed for an economic meltdown that can only be averted with a dramatic change in the distribution of industry revenues and a new mechanism for controlling the growth of...
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
The state Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that more than 1,300 workers who participated or assisted in a one-month strike against Giant Food Inc. were not entitled to unemployment insurance.In an opinion reversing two lower court rulings, the state's highest court ruled that, because the strike constituted a "stoppage of work," workers were disqualified from receiving unemployment benefits.The decision marks a victory for Giant, the Landover-based subsidiary of Royal Ahold NV, the Netherlands-based international food retailer.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
The euphoria in Washington over the likely return of Major League Baseball is such that it hardly bothers anyone that the Montreal Expos team they're inheriting has been languishing in last place all season. The Expos, who have been owned by Major League Baseball's other 29 teams for the past three years, lost their final home game last night, giving them a 65-94 record with three road games left in the season. Their best player is second baseman Jose Vidro, a three-time All-Star, but he's been hobbled with a knee injury, leaving a pretty unheralded roster.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
Baltimore dockworkers narrowly approved a new five-year local contract last night, averting a possible work stoppage that could have diverted badly needed cargo from the port.Reversing an overwhelmingly negative vote of one week ago, members of the International Longshoremen's Association here voted 456 to 421 to accept the agreement, which includes a controversial $4,000 cash payment in exchange for eliminating the union's sacred guaranteed annual income program.Dockworkers also accepted cuts in wages and the size of work gangs for break-bulk cargo, though the cuts in gangs were less than those in the original contract rejected Oct. 2.Work continued on the docks after the union rejected the pact by a 736-to-129 vote last week, with both sides agreeing to extend the old contract while talks resumed.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | October 14, 1992
Brian Jordan, one of two young men convicted of shooting a South Carroll High School student to death five years ago, has been living in Maryland's toughest prison since February, transferred there after inciting a prison work stoppage.Jordan's transfer to the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center -- or "Supermax" -- came less than two months after he asked Carroll Circuit Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. to reduce his sentence.According to Division of Corrections records and recent letters from Jordan's attorney and State's Attorney Thomas E. Hickman, Maryland Penitentiary officials had Jordan moved to the super-high-security prison Feb. 6.Inmates in the penitentiary participated in a prisonwide strike Jan. 31, records show.
SPORTS
January 11, 2012
Money sure is good Juan C. Rodriguez Sun Sentinel Bud Selig's $18.4 million salary dwarfs those of NFL and NBA counterparts Roger Goodell ($10.9 million) and David Stern ($10 million). Why wouldn't he want to stick around? Under Selig's watch, the sport's revenues have ballooned from $1.4 billion (1995) to $7 billion (2010). From 1995-00, in the aftermath of the last work stoppage, those revenues on average rose 19.5 percent annually. Selig's tenure has endured a few hiccups.
SPORTS
By Lance Pugmire, Tribune newspapers | September 20, 2011
LAV VEGAS — Billy Hunter, the executive director of the National Basketball Players Assn., emerged last week from a meeting with one-tenth of his 400-plus locked out players. With NBA owners pushing hard on the idea they need to significantly slash payroll and institute a hard salary cap as a response to their claim 23 of 30 teams are losing money, Hunter's players appear headed to a fall — and perhaps winter — without paychecks. Player unity, then, is a crucial element of avoiding a salary free fall.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Local cartoonist Michael Cotter asked the assembled youngsters at the Annapolis area library to name a big story in the news, and 13-year-old Rhaei Brown, who was sporting a Ravens jersey, couldn't utter his answer fast enough. "The lockout!" the Annapolis resident exclaimed, referring to the NFL work stoppage that recently ended. Then Rhaei created a cartoon about the lockout in which he depicted an NFL executive and a football player tugging at opposite sides of an oversized dollar bill.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | July 15, 2011
The NFL moved closer to an agreement with its players Friday and could reach one by Tuesday, a resolution that would end a four-month work stoppage and ensure the $9 billion league opens as scheduled in September. At the end of a week when the often bitter tones of the dispute were replaced by gentle sounds of reconciliation, the league and the players released a joint statement to say they have made progress and will hold talks over the weekend. "The discussions this week have been constructive, and progress has been made on a wide range of issues," the two sides said.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
The Maryland Lottery said Wednesday it plans to release the newest Baltimore Ravens-themed lottery ticket in August, but that is dependent on the resolution of the National Football League's lockout. The ticket will offer more than $11.2 million in cash prizes, including six opportunities to win $250,000. Other "second-chance" winnings will include a $1 million cash prize, season tickets for life, season tickets in 2012, game-day premium seats, an away trip with the team, a Ravens-themed "man cave," a Ravens hospitality tent for 30 people and autographed helmets and other prizes.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 7, 2011
Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco appeared on 97.5 The Fanatic in Philadelphia on Monday afternoon, and he was asked about Ray Lewis’ controversial comments about how an extended work stoppage would lead to an increase in crime in NFL cities. Rarely one to rock the boat, Flacco said, “I hear what he’s saying.” “I mean from the standpoint of if we don’t play football, the cities are definitely going to struggle in some sense. Economically, whatever it’s going to be,” the fourth-year quarterback, back home in New Jersey, told host Mike Missanelli . “Honestly, all the owners can probably go a year without playing football.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
The region's Red Cross chapter says the union representing 50 employees involved in blood drive operations has threatened to strike next Friday if a new contract is not reached. Teamsters Local 311 sent a letter of intent to the Greater Chesapeake and Potomac Blood Services Region warning of a work stoppage, an action the nonprofit agency labeled "irresponsible" and a potential disruption to blood collection operations to aid areas ravaged by Superstorm Sandy. The local, chartered in 1952 and headquartered in Baltimore, did not return requests for comment.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2006
Pedro Reyes, a paralegal at a firm specializing in immigration, said he is weary of turning away most would-be clients. Illegal immigrants who are unfamiliar with the nation's convoluted legal system are shattered, Reyes said yesterday, when he explains to them that they are ineligible for what they crave most: a green card and the privileges of legal residency it holds. With a Colombian flag draped from his belt loop and an American flag held high above his head, Reyes joined demonstrators at Baltimore's Patterson Park, urging reform that would guarantee a path to U.S. citizenship for the nation's estimated 11 million illegal immigrants.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
When six Ravens tested the NFL's tenuous labor peace early Friday, they found an open door and a sense of normalcy. But before night fell, the peace was shattered and the door closed. The league won a temporary administrative stay from the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday night, restoring the lockout at least through the weekend. The three-person appellate court will listen to arguments next week on the NFL's request to overturn the decision of a federal court in Minneapolis that the lockout was illegal.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 9, 2011
Former Ravens coach Brian Billick talked at length about the then-looming labor situation in his 2009 book, "More Than a Game. " He and co-author Michael MacCambridge wrote then that if there is a lockout, "all the momentum that the league has enjoyed for the past twenty years is shot to hell. " A year and a half later, the NFL and the NFL Players Association are negotiating to prevent a work stoppage, and one of the big sticking points for the players is the owners' refusal to open up their books.
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