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August 10, 2010
Hard line is drawn Sam Farmer Los Angeles Times Plaxico Burress should not be permitted to play in the NFL this season. Even if his request for work release is granted, and he somehow clears all the hurdles to come back to football (can he play in out-of-state games, for instance?), Burress needs to complete his entire sentence to return. That's what Roger Goodell ruled, and it's not unreasonable. Goodell's hard-line approach to players who run afoul of the law has been the most successful initiative of his tenure as commissioner.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 18, 2014
Running a jail is at once among the most unrewarding of endeavors and important functions in society. Regular readers of the police blotter published in this newspaper can attest that, while there are new names in the arrest columns, a disturbing number of people show up with disturbing frequency. If jails were airlines, they would be racking up some serious frequent flier miles. To those working at the Harford County Detention Center, it cannot be an uplifting experience to so frequently see the same un-rehabilitated faces cycling through until they do something bad enough to be sentenced to serious time in the state penitentiary, get themselves killed or maimed badly enough that their street days end or finally grow tired of their own anti-social behavior.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The man shot at the Lutherville Light Rail Station Friday night is in an inmate work release program, serving a 24-year sentence for attempted murder, a Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services spokesman confirmed Monday. Harold J. Blandon, Jr., 35, was shot by an unknown assailant at the platform after completing his day job and was returning to the re-entry facility, said DPSCS spokesman Mark A. Vernarelli in an email. Baltimore County police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said detectives are still working to determine whether Blandon was targeted.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
Medical bills and other expenses strained Race Rudd Sr.'s finances, so replacing his broken-down car was beyond his means. In an imperfect arrangement, he relied on a friend to ferry him between his home in Odenton and his job as cook at the Hope House, a substance abuse treatment facility in Crownsville. One day, he told the head of the Anne Arundel County Food & Resource Bank, a Hope House neighbor where he picked up food for the treatment center, that he sure could use wheels.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1994
An Edgewood man convicted of killing two people while driving drunk received a sentence of 14 months on work release yesterday, bringing cries of disbelief from the victims' family in a Baltimore County courtroom."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Kate Shatzkin and Ivan Penn and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
State public safety officials have suspended the work release program at the Patuxent Institution, after an inmate who failed to return from a weekend pass wounded a sheriff's deputy in a shootout Friday afternoon in Montana.The inmate, Charles Elmer Carpenter, 32, of Clear Spring, was killed in the shootout near Landusky, Mont., a small mining town in the north-central area of the state. The shootout began after the deputy pulled over Carpenter's car while investigating a complaint of suspicious people in the area, according to Arlyn Greydanus, chief of the Montana Criminal Investigations Bureau.
NEWS
By Ed Brandt and Ed Brandt,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
The driver of a car involved in a fatal drunken-driving accident had his probation revoked in Baltimore County Circuit Court and was sent to prison yesterday because he had been found drunk while on work-release.Michael Brian Dobihal, now 20, was convicted in March 1992 of auto manslaughter, drunken driving and reckless driving in the Nov. 13, 1991, accident. Kimberly Jo Spacek, 15, died about an hour after the accident. Dobihal was not hurt.In June last year, Judge Thomas J. Bollinger sentenced Dobihal to five years in prison with all but 18 months suspended.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 1995
With her husband locked away serving a three-year sentence for rape, Mary Ruth Marsh was able to find the courage to start a new life, free of abuse.But an icy patch on a fogged-in Carroll County road quickly detoured her new journey.When Mrs. Marsh lost control of her car and slammed into a telephone pole near Winfield last week, her two children were thrown from their seats.Her 2-year-old son was injured; her 4-year-old daughter was killed.Though she didn't realize it until yesterday, Mrs. Marsh's desire to give Guy Gordon Marsh Jr. one last chance to see their daughter, Sonia, provided him a ticket out of prison.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
Taking orders at the drive-through window or flipping burgers at the grill, the 44-year-old Baltimore grandmother does whatever needs to be done on the night shift at a McDonald's in Jessup.When she finishes her shift, she waves goodbye to fellow employees heading home. Then she returns to jail.The woman is one of 38 inmates in the Howard County Detention Center serving their sentences in the jail's work-release program. Inmates work at such local businesses as diners, hotels, fast-food restaurants, construction companies, dry cleaners, car-towing companies and auto body shops.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
Taking orders at the drive-through window or flipping burgers at the grill, the 44-year-old Baltimore grandmother does whatever needs to be done on the night shift at a Jessup McDonald's.When she finishes her work, she waves goodbye to fellow employees heading home. Then she returns to jail.The woman is one of 38 work-release inmates in the Howard County Detention Center who work at such local diners, hotels, fast-food restaurants, construction companies, dry cleaners, car-towing companies and auto body shops.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
The man shot at the Lutherville Light Rail Station Friday night is in an inmate work release program, serving a 24-year sentence for attempted murder, a Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services spokesman confirmed Monday. Harold J. Blandon, Jr., 35, was shot by an unknown assailant at the platform after completing his day job and was returning to the re-entry facility, said DPSCS spokesman Mark A. Vernarelli in an email. Baltimore County police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said detectives are still working to determine whether Blandon was targeted.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
A Catonsville man who is serving an eight year sentence for violating the terms of his probation did not return from his work release assignment in Towson on Wednesday, according to state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. Mark Randolph, 35, was working at a Towson business as part program that employees offenders nearing the end of their sentence. He was at an unsupervised location, and officials said he did not return to the Baltimore Pre-Release Unit on Greenmount Avenue by 4:30 p.m. Randolph has faced numerous drug-related and assault charges over the past few years but most were dropped until he pleaded guilty in 2006 to drug distribution charge, according to court records.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
Hard line is drawn Sam Farmer Los Angeles Times Plaxico Burress should not be permitted to play in the NFL this season. Even if his request for work release is granted, and he somehow clears all the hurdles to come back to football (can he play in out-of-state games, for instance?), Burress needs to complete his entire sentence to return. That's what Roger Goodell ruled, and it's not unreasonable. Goodell's hard-line approach to players who run afoul of the law has been the most successful initiative of his tenure as commissioner.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
State officials describe Paula Jordan as a nonviolent inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup. That made her a perfect candidate to work at a Howard County horse farm as part of a rehabilitation program. Here is what the 41-year-old from Baltimore did to get locked up: In January 2005, she chased after her boyfriend swinging a butcher's knife, stabbed him in the leg, mopped up the blood, cleaned the blade and put it back into its holder before police arrived.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Typically, prisoners who are on work release get to leave the inside of the jail to work outside the fence, and then must return. David Newton, on home detention awaiting trial on drug and burglary charges, had an opposite course. He would leave his home to go to work inside the jail, and would then return to his house at the end of the day, as a condition of his pre-trial release. So prison officials were perplexed Wednesday afternoon when they said the 19-year-old Newton, who was not cuffed or shackled, ran from correctional officers who were escorting him to the laundry room at the Baltimore City Detention Center.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Don.markus@baltsun.com | July 29, 2009
A Howard County jury took an hour Tuesday to find a 38-year-old Carroll County man guilty of using a high school friend's identity to obtain a Florida driver's license so he could avoid prosecution for driving after his own Maryland license had been revoked. Gerald Titus Jr. of the 2200 block of Gillis Road in Woodbine will be sentenced by Judge Louis A. Becker III in October. Titus, who seemed on the verge of accepting a plea that would have carried an 18-month sentence in county jail, faces up to 3 1/2 years in a state facility.
SPORTS
By RAFAEL ALVAREZ and RAFAEL ALVAREZ,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
Former heavyweight boxing champ Mike Tyson -- sentenced last week to a year in a Montgomery County jail for assaulting two motorists after a minor traffic accident last August -- may be able to fight on a work-release program by late spring. Tyson, 32, entered an early prison release screening program yesterday that could get him out of jail and back in training within four months, said a spokeswoman for the Montgomery County Department of Correction and Rehabilitation. "Everyone who is sentenced to serve [local]
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Kate Shatzkin and Ivan Penn and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
State public safety officials have suspended the work-release program at Patuxent Institution, after an inmate who failed to return from a weekend pass wounded a sheriff's deputy in a shootout Friday afternoon in Montana.The inmate, Charles Elmer Carpenter, 32, of Clear Spring, was killed in the shootout near Landusky, a small mining town in north-central Montana. The shootout began after the deputy pulled over Carpenter's car while investigating a complaint of suspicious people in the area, according to Arlyn Greydanus, chief of the Montana Criminal Investigations Bureau.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN AND GINA DAVIS and DAVID P. GREISMAN AND GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTERS | August 15, 2006
A Westminster man who held police at bay in January while he repeatedly stabbed his girlfriend outside a Hess gas station was sentenced yesterday to two concurrent 30-year prison terms, with all but 20 years suspended. With his hands cuffed behind his back, Jason Michael Woodward, 20, of the first block of Middle Grove Court East waved to his family before being led away after Carroll Circuit Judge Michael M. Galloway found him guilty of attempted second-degree murder and kidnapping. "The facts of this case are horrific," Galloway said.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
With walls of cream-colored concrete and banks of opaque windows, the Baltimore County Detention Center addition rising from the dust on a Towson street corner looks more like a sprawling office building than a typical jail. Its design is intended to mollify neighbors who bitterly opposed the project from the start. Good luck. "It peeves me every time I see it," said Mike Ertel, who lives about a quarter-mile from the site. "This giant building sticks out like a sore thumb." Nearly five years after Ertel and his neighbors waged a fierce but ultimately futile battle against the project, the $74 million jail expansion is nearing completion, albeit a bit behind schedule.
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