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NEWS
May 31, 2012
Thank you for printing the full text of David Simon's Georgetown University commencement address. It was the best I have read, excepting Woody Allen's, of course. If Mr. Simon made anyone uncomfortable, good. Because it needed to be said, and it needed to be said now. I thank him for being gutsy enough to say it. Rosellen Fleishman, Baltimore
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NEWS
John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  INCUNABULA Saying "in-kyoo-NAB-yuh-luh" may sound like an incantation to you, but you are in fact referring to something in the earliest stages of its development. The word passes into English directly from Latin, where it means "swaddling-clothes," deriving from cunae , "cradle.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
The ever-game Steve Kleinedler of the American Heritage Dictionary took on one of those chores that regularly fall to lexicographers: He appeared on Boston's WBUR to talk about words people want deleted from dictionaries .  Literally  and impacted  left my eyebrows level. Yeah, yeah. And some unduly excitable types, you'll see in the comments, got exercised when the executive editor of the American Heritage Dictionary , in the unbuttoned atmosphere of conversation uttered "a whole nother.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  STYMIE Holding, with Mr. Mencken, that "no man guilty of golf should be eligible for office of trust or profit under the United states," I am mercifully unacquainted with the terminology of the game and was unaware that the word of the week originated on the links in Scotland.  A stymie  (pronounced STY-mee)
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
As if living through the past year were not trial enough to endure, we are about to be subjected to everyone's year-in-review retrospective. Among the year-end rituals, one of the more light-hearted is the various word nerd efforts to establish a Word of the Year.  First out of the gate, the Oxford University Press annunces that the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is selfie . Not to be outdone, Merriam-Webster proclaims ...
NEWS
February 5, 2010
The judge's words Excerpts from Judge Dennis M. Sweeney's statement: •"Simply put, Ms. Dixon leaves the office in total disgrace after a career that saw her become the first woman elected to that office." •"The agreement allows the City of Baltimore to move forward from this painful and dispiriting episode." •"Before this trial began, many said that a Baltimore City jury like the one picked in this case would never be able to deal with it. ... In contrast ... all the jurors took the case very seriously, put aside their personal biases and worked very hard together."
SPORTS
By Tribune Newspapers and news services | February 20, 2010
You've likely heard the speech by now, but body language experts saw much more than the words of Tiger Woods. Patti Wood, author of "Success Signals," told UsMagazine.com Friday that she was surprised by how tense Woods was when he spoke publicly for the first time since his sex scandal broke in November. "He could have prepared more," she said of his 13 1/2-minute apology before friends, family and a worldwide TV audience. "The fact that he chose to read so much as opposed to committing to memory - his voice got singsongy.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
The article ("Conservatives cringe at the new pope's words," Oct. 20) begs the proverbial question, "What would Jesus say or do?" For the answer, all one has to do is look to Pope Francis. The new Pope is the most Christian (Christ-like) Pope since Jesus Christ left the Church Militant to head the Church Triumphant! Anthony Wysocki, Parkville
NEWS
By Steven Pinker | April 6, 1994
THE Los Angeles Times' new "Guidelines on Racial and Ethnic Identification," for its writers and editors, bans or restricts some 150 words and phrases such as "birth defect," "Chinese fire drill," "crazy," "dark continent," "stepchild," "WASP" and "to welsh."Defying such politically correct sensibilities, the Economist allows the use of variants of "he" for both males and females (as in "everyone should watch his language"), and "crippled" for disabled people.One side says that language insidiously shapes attitudes and that vigilance against subtle offense is necessary to eliminate prejudice.
NEWS
November 13, 2005
"I don't understand men." 'Are men necessary by Maureen Dowd
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  FLORILEGIUM Florilegium  (pronounced flor-uh-LEE-jee-um) is one of those gather-ye-rosebuds words. From the Latin flos , floris , "flower," plus legere , "gather. " It indicates a gathering or collection of brief extracts or writing.  It is thus a fancy word for "anthology," though the emphasis is on short items rather than a bulky compendium.  Example: Garry Wills, who thought Daniel Patrick Moynihan a poseur, says this in an article collected in Lead Time (2004)
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Roy Valiant is totally correct about the anthem being disrespected by Orioles fans ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept. 18). But I would like to go a step further. At many sporting events, unfortunately, it seems, most often at NASCAR events but others as well, the performer changes the anthem to "make it their own. " This works well on "American Idol" where the contestants are encouraged to do so. But not with "The Star Spangled Banner. " That should be left alone. "Free" and "brave" are one syllable words.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
At Bay Theatre's Wine and Words production of "Four Weddings and an Elvis," a staged reading by Bay's brilliant team of actors on Sept. 8, the capacity audience discovered that life sometimes imitates art. The "Four Weddings" became five, with the fifth a real-life wedding ceremony in which Bay's co-founder and artistic director, Janet Luby, married longtime love Stephen Strawn in a ceremony on stage. The nuptials came with much applause and best wishes from at least 250 audience and family members in attendance, turning the show into a true wedding party.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Fall isn't just for mums anymore. Those round mounds of yellow, rust or purple are a poor way to celebrate the luxurious Mid-Atlantic fall - and ease a gardener's itch to plant something. Now is the time to refresh decorative garden pots with a rich variety of color and hardiness that can carry their beauty beyond the first frost. "Fall is a missed opportunity," said Kerry Michaels, who writes about container gardening at about.com. "The plants are on sale; it lasts so much longer than a flower arrangement.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SUBLUNARY Unless you're reading sixteen- and seventeenth-century literature, you're not likely to find sublunary  cropping up often, more's the pity. (More's the pity, too, that you're not reading more sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature.)  The word mean existing beneath the moon (from the Latin sub , "under," luna , "moon")
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 1, 2014
I never liked it when George W. Bush used the term "evildoers" to describe al-Qaeda and other terrorists. A lot of other people objected as well, but for different reasons. I didn't like the term because it always sounded to me like he was saying "evil Dewar's," as in the blended Scotch. (This always made some of Bush's statements chuckle-worthy -- "We will not rest until we find the evil Dewar's!") I prefer single malts, but "evil" always seemed unduly harsh. The more common objection to "evildoers" was that it was, variously, simplistic, Manichean, imperialistic, cartoonish, etc. "Perhaps without even realizing it," Peter Roff, then with UPI, wrote in October 2001, "the president is using language that recalls a simpler time when good and evil seemed more easy to identify -- a time when issues, television programs and movies were more black and white, not colored by subtle hues of meaning.
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