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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1992
Here are summaries of some recent Computing magazine product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four, with one computer indicating poor and four indicating excellent:WordPerfect 5.1 for Windows, for PC or compatible running Windows 3.0 with at least 2 megabytes RAM (4 megabytes recommended). $495 (or $99 upgrade from DOS WordPerfect). From WordPerfect Corp. 1555 N. Technology Way, Orem, UT 84057. (800) 451-5151.Word for Windows 2.0, for PC or compatible running Windows 3.0 with at least 2 megabytes RAM (3 megabytes recommended)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
I use Windows XP Home, WordPerfect 10 and Outlook Express 6. I can't spell-check my e-mail. What should I do? Three solutions come to mind, and all of them are going to take a tad of effort. First of all, Outlook Express does take its spell-checking from Microsoft Office, so PCs shipped with WordPerfect but neither Microsoft Works nor Microsoft Office don't arrive ready to spell-check e-mail. The cheapest solution is to simply write your e-mail messages as WordPerfect documents, spell-check, then paste them into the Outlook Express e-mail form.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
I use Windows XP Home, WordPerfect 10 and Outlook Express 6. I can't spell-check my e-mail. What should I do? Three solutions come to mind, and all of them are going to take a tad of effort. First of all, Outlook Express does take its spell-checking from Microsoft Office, so PCs shipped with WordPerfect but neither Microsoft Works nor Microsoft Office don't arrive ready to spell-check e-mail. The cheapest solution is to simply write your e-mail messages as WordPerfect documents, spell-check, then paste them into the Outlook Express e-mail form.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | August 12, 1996
THE POPULARITY of plug-in modules for Web browsers like Netscape Navigator has led some pundits to conclude that we are finally well along the road to modular "object-oriented" software. Supposedly the Internet will soon be awash in single-purpose components that we will buy, rent or be permitted to use free of charge, though not necessarily free of advertising.This is not necessarily a good thing for those of us old enough to remember when thesauri and spell checkers were costly separate add-ons to bare-bones word processors and when operating systems came without even rudimentary file management software.
BUSINESS
By O. Casey Corr and O. Casey Corr,Seattle Times | March 23, 1992
Seattle -- Late last December, one of Microsoft's senior managers spotted an article in the computer-trade press and suddenly felt ill.On the front page of InfoWorld was an article revealing glitches in a new version of Microsoft's word-processing program, Word for Windows. Chris Peters, general manager of the Word business unit, lost his appetite and couldn't sleep for three days. It ruined his Christmas."I take this stuff personally. It's my life," Mr. Peters says.With an attitude like that, it's no wonder Microsoft is succeeding.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1991
Software Associates Inc., a computer software consulting company in Linthicum, formed a Micro Computer Division to provide marketing and support services for its micro-computer medical software package. Stewart Rawle heads the new division.Anne Arundel Trade Council formed a reciprocal membership agreement with the Federation of Sussex Industries & Chamber of Commerce in Sussex, England, to foster international trade.World Trade Institute in Baltimore hosted a delegation of 17 Soviet businessmen from the coal-mining industry.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 3, 1992
NOVATO, Calif. -- Wordstar International Inc. may have lost the word processing battle during the 1980s, but it will remain a contender through acquisitions and a focus on new markets, said Chairman Ronald Posner."
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | August 12, 1996
THE POPULARITY of plug-in modules for Web browsers like Netscape Navigator has led some pundits to conclude that we are finally well along the road to modular "object-oriented" software. Supposedly the Internet will soon be awash in single-purpose components that we will buy, rent or be permitted to use free of charge, though not necessarily free of advertising.This is not necessarily a good thing for those of us old enough to remember when thesauri and spell checkers were costly separate add-ons to bare-bones word processors and when operating systems came without even rudimentary file management software.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 13, 1992
OK, so you've decided to open Windows for a breath of computing fresh air.You see the advantages in terms of user-friendliness, smaller learning curves and shared data across software applications. You've upgraded your system to a 386, with lots of storage space on your hard disk. And, you're willing to put up with annoying inconsistencies, like longer print times.Now, which Windows software should you buy? Most non-profits define their basic software needs in terms of word processing, spreadsheet, graphic presentation, desktop publishing and data-base packages.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Jelle Nijdam isn't silly enough to take his win in the prologue of the Tour Du Pont cycling event last night and make something grand out of it.Nijdam is, after all, a specialist in these kinds of races, the sprints that determine seeding for the first stage of the main event.In that sense, Nijdam, 29, is the Brady Anderson of the WordPerfect team, and it's his job to smooth the way for the team's heavy hitter, Raul Alcala of Monterrey, Mexico.So, even though Nijdam was the only participant in the 118-man field to ride the 2.98-mile course in less than 6 minutes (5:55:07)
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 8, 1993
The Wordperfect Corp.'s new Wordperfect 6.0 for Windows is an impressive program that tries to be everything to everybody. One of the surprising things about it is that, to a large degree, it appears to succeed -- if, of course, you have sufficient horsepower on the desktop.Wordperfect 6.0 offers tools and features that go beyond word processing, including advanced spreadsheet functions, drawing and charting tools, clip art and special effects. In essence, it crosses the line into the realm normally associated with integrated software packages and so-called office suites.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | May 8, 1993
WILMINGTON, Del. -- There's clearly a lot of cycling left in this year's Tour DuPont event, but a clear pattern is starting to emerge.Though the overall victory in the 11-day event will go to an individual, it seems that, after two stages, that person may well come from the fledgling WordPerfect team.In its first year of sponsorship, the Utah-based computer software manufacturer already has assembled a team that has the top four individual riders and five in the top six.The seven-member team, led by individual overall leader Jelle Nijdam and pre-race favorite Raul Alcala, won overwhelmingly in last night's second stage in a 15.4-mile team time trial.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Jelle Nijdam isn't silly enough to take his win in the prologue of the Tour Du Pont cycling event last night and make something grand out of it.Nijdam is, after all, a specialist in these kinds of races, the sprints that determine seeding for the first stage of the main event.In that sense, Nijdam, 29, is the Brady Anderson of the WordPerfect team, and it's his job to smooth the way for the team's heavy hitter, Raul Alcala of Monterrey, Mexico.So, even though Nijdam was the only participant in the 118-man field to ride the 2.98-mile course in less than 6 minutes (5:55:07)
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 3, 1992
NOVATO, Calif. -- Wordstar International Inc. may have lost the word processing battle during the 1980s, but it will remain a contender through acquisitions and a focus on new markets, said Chairman Ronald Posner."
BUSINESS
By O. Casey Corr and O. Casey Corr,Seattle Times | March 23, 1992
Seattle -- Late last December, one of Microsoft's senior managers spotted an article in the computer-trade press and suddenly felt ill.On the front page of InfoWorld was an article revealing glitches in a new version of Microsoft's word-processing program, Word for Windows. Chris Peters, general manager of the Word business unit, lost his appetite and couldn't sleep for three days. It ruined his Christmas."I take this stuff personally. It's my life," Mr. Peters says.With an attitude like that, it's no wonder Microsoft is succeeding.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1992
Here are summaries of some recent Computing magazine product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four, with one computer indicating poor and four indicating excellent:WordPerfect 5.1 for Windows, for PC or compatible running Windows 3.0 with at least 2 megabytes RAM (4 megabytes recommended). $495 (or $99 upgrade from DOS WordPerfect). From WordPerfect Corp. 1555 N. Technology Way, Orem, UT 84057. (800) 451-5151.Word for Windows 2.0, for PC or compatible running Windows 3.0 with at least 2 megabytes RAM (3 megabytes recommended)
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | November 5, 1990
MY FRIEND BEN came to the office with this tale of life in the slow lane.He'd been using WordPerfect for years, with no complaints. One day he ran into a problem with a research paper his wife was preparing. So he dug into the back of the manual and called WordPerfect's help line.One of the company's 562 friendly technical support people answered the phone and tried to work through the problem with him. Nothing they tried seemed to help.Finally, the tech support rep asked what version of the program Ben was using.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | June 24, 1991
Sam's law firm is small, but it's growing nicely. So nicely that the lawyers decided to buy some new computers for their secretaries.They went to the local computer store and bought four pricey IBM-compatibles with high-speed 80386 microprocessors. According to Sam, they thought it would upgrade the image of the firm. Sam was out of town while it happened, and he was furious when he got back."We spent a fortune on these things, and the only thing we do with them is run WordPerfect," he fumed.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 13, 1992
OK, so you've decided to open Windows for a breath of computing fresh air.You see the advantages in terms of user-friendliness, smaller learning curves and shared data across software applications. You've upgraded your system to a 386, with lots of storage space on your hard disk. And, you're willing to put up with annoying inconsistencies, like longer print times.Now, which Windows software should you buy? Most non-profits define their basic software needs in terms of word processing, spreadsheet, graphic presentation, desktop publishing and data-base packages.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | June 24, 1991
Sam's law firm is small, but it's growing nicely. So nicely that the lawyers decided to buy some new computers for their secretaries.They went to the local computer store and bought four pricey IBM-compatibles with high-speed 80386 microprocessors. According to Sam, they thought it would upgrade the image of the firm. Sam was out of town while it happened, and he was furious when he got back."We spent a fortune on these things, and the only thing we do with them is run WordPerfect," he fumed.
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