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NEWS
April 19, 2004
On April 17, 2004, RUTH E. WORDEN (nee Seager); beloved wife of the late Emory " Bill " Worden Sr., devoted mother of Donald E. Worden , William E. Worden, Patricia A. Cosden and the late Emory " Butch " Worden Jr., loving grandmother of Kimberly A., Donald E. Jr., William E. Jr., and Scot M. Loving great-grandmother of Erik Ciara and Tucker. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home Inc., 3631 Falls Rd. on Tuesday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 8 at which time funeral services will be held.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
The Baltimore County police officer injured when a 16-year-old allegedly attempted to flee in a stolen minivan in Towson over the weekend is an 18-year veteran assigned to the Towson Precinct Patrol Division, a department spokeswoman said. An Officer Worden attempted to pull over a white Dodge Caravan driven by Antonio Rashad Green on Bristol Road, near Stoneleigh Road, early Saturday morning, but the routine traffic stop ended with Worden's firing several rounds after Green attempted to back over him, police said.
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NEWS
December 26, 2007
Mary Louise Worden, a mother of five who enjoyed watercolor painting, died of breast cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Glen Arm resident was 84. Born Mary Louise Veale in Baltimore, she spent much of her childhood in Roland Park and graduated from Western High School in 1941. She developed an early interest in the arts - music, singing and painting - and took courses at the Maryland Institute College of Art while in high school to develop her painting skills.
NEWS
December 26, 2007
Mary Louise Worden, a mother of five who enjoyed watercolor painting, died of breast cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The Glen Arm resident was 84. Born Mary Louise Veale in Baltimore, she spent much of her childhood in Roland Park and graduated from Western High School in 1941. She developed an early interest in the arts - music, singing and painting - and took courses at the Maryland Institute College of Art while in high school to develop her painting skills.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Peter Hermann and Kate Shatzkin and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writers | September 1, 1995
As slayings in Baltimore continue their alarming pace, the city's homicide unit is losing some of its most respected veteran detectives, worrying some prosecutors and police that the trend could threaten the quality of investigations.Publicly, many detectives say it is simply their time to go. But privately, investigators contend that the policies of the city's police commissioner no longer value their experience.The latest flurry of retirement bashes, sentimental speeches and parting shots began Aug. 18 with Detective Bertina Silver, one of homicide's first female investigators when she joined the unit seven years ago.Then came Richard Garvey's night, a week ago at a bar on Harford Road.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
The mysterious disappearance of a Civil War-era ceremonial sword from the U.S. Naval Academy's campus in Annapolis in 1931 has long baffled federal agents and descendants of the Union war hero to whom it was awarded. But no longer. Today, FBI officials will clear up the mystery of the Worden Sword's theft as they return the ornate Tiffany & Co. sword to the academy. "We're extremely excited about having this coming-home," said academy spokesman Cmdr. Rod Gibbons. For members of the Worden family, news of the sword's recovery brought back long-buried memories.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
The mysterious disappearance of a Civil War-era ceremonial sword from the U.S. Naval Academy's campus in Annapolis in 1931 has long baffled federal agents and descendants of the Union war hero to whom it was awarded. But no longer. Today, FBI officials will clear up the mystery of the Worden Sword's theft as they return the ornate Tiffany & Co. sword to the academy. "We're extremely excited about having this coming-home," said academy spokesman Cmdr. Rod Gibbons. For members of the Worden family, news of the sword's recovery brought back long-buried memories.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
The FBI announced yesterday plans to return a historic sword that once belonged to a Civil War captain to the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, where it was housed until it was reported missing in 1931. Bureau officials will be in Annapolis on Monday to return the sword, a gift from the state of New York to Capt. John Lorimer Worden. He commanded the USS Monitor in the 1862 naval battle with the CSS Virginia, a Confederate warship better known as the Merrimack. Worden died in 1897, leaving the Tiffany & Co. sword to his son. He donated it to the museum in 1912.
FEATURES
By David Simon and David Simon,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1995
Donald Worden checks the mailbox for the apartment number, looks up the three-story metal stair and instantly blames his partner for bringing him here.You should be ashamed makin' me climb all these stairs at my age.""Oh, it's my fault," says Kevin Davis.He's on the lower landing when he looks up to see that the door in question still has its Christmas decoration affixed. He looks at Worden and rolls his eyes, as if the red ribbon wreath is a harbinger of things to come."She must be some real piece of work," says Davis.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
The questions came fast and so matter-of-factly yesterday that it was hard to remember the questioners were no more than 13 years old."If somebody has a knife and tries to stab you, do you get in trouble?""If you're beating up on me and I'm just holding back, getting scarred up, will I get suspended?""If I'm wrestling with my brother, does that count?"Addressing those questions -- and the larger social context of violence in schools that breeds them -- is the task of Baltimore County Police Department's Violence Prevention Program.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2005
Baltimore County police will begin using a program that employs an automated phone system to help find missing people. The department says it is among the first in the state to make use of the A Child is Missing program, which is capable of making up to 1,000 calls a minute to homes and businesses after receiving a report that a person is missing or has been abducted. "If a child goes missing, it's critical to get the ball rolling right away," said John Worden, a counseling team supervisor for the Baltimore County Police Department, who helped bring the program to his agency.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
Only in death could WHFS find life. The alternative radio station was pulled from the air in January - an act of mercy after a long death spiral. Ratings had tanked, and WHFS had lost much of the audience and spirit that had made it among the most beloved and progressive stations in the country. But just four months later, HFS is back, staging its popular HFStival today at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, settling into a new home on the dial and making an unlikely climb to the top of the ratings.
NEWS
April 19, 2004
On April 17, 2004, RUTH E. WORDEN (nee Seager); beloved wife of the late Emory " Bill " Worden Sr., devoted mother of Donald E. Worden , William E. Worden, Patricia A. Cosden and the late Emory " Butch " Worden Jr., loving grandmother of Kimberly A., Donald E. Jr., William E. Jr., and Scot M. Loving great-grandmother of Erik Ciara and Tucker. Friends are invited to call at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home Inc., 3631 Falls Rd. on Tuesday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 8 at which time funeral services will be held.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Missing, 1931. Scrawled in pencil on the worn corner of a 3-by-5-inch note card, the notation is the museum's only inventory record of the mysterious theft of the U.S. Naval Academy's Worden Sword. One word, one date - preserved in the depths of one of the academy's old filing cabinets labeled "personal swords." It wasn't much. But it was all the evidence FBI agents needed when they phoned academy museum curator Jim Cheevers recently to inquire about the disappearance of the Civil War-era sword seven decades ago. "They told me up front they thought they had found it," said Cheevers, curator for the past 36 years.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
The mysterious disappearance of a Civil War-era ceremonial sword from the U.S. Naval Academy's campus in Annapolis in 1931 has long baffled federal agents and descendants of the Union war hero to whom it was awarded. But no longer. Today, FBI officials will clear up the mystery of the Worden Sword's theft as they return the ornate Tiffany & Co. sword to the academy. "We're extremely excited about having this coming-home," said academy spokesman Cmdr. Rod Gibbons. For members of the Worden family, news of the sword's recovery brought back long-buried memories.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
The mysterious disappearance of a Civil War-era ceremonial sword from the U.S. Naval Academy's campus in Annapolis in 1931 has long baffled federal agents and descendants of the Union war hero to whom it was awarded. But no longer. Today, FBI officials will clear up the mystery of the Worden Sword's theft as they return the ornate Tiffany & Co. sword to the academy. "We're extremely excited about having this coming-home," said academy spokesman Cmdr. Rod Gibbons. For members of the Worden family, news of the sword's recovery brought back long-buried memories.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2005
Baltimore County police will begin using a program that employs an automated phone system to help find missing people. The department says it is among the first in the state to make use of the A Child is Missing program, which is capable of making up to 1,000 calls a minute to homes and businesses after receiving a report that a person is missing or has been abducted. "If a child goes missing, it's critical to get the ball rolling right away," said John Worden, a counseling team supervisor for the Baltimore County Police Department, who helped bring the program to his agency.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann Thom Loverro of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | March 4, 1991
A man whom police initially believed to have been killed in a car accident early yesterday on Edmondson Avenue apparently was a murder victim instead -- shot in the chest before the crash, homicide detectives said.Police said they had no leads in the death of Kenneth Clausen, 33, of the 700 block of Ollea Drive, Ellicott City -- and didn't even know he had been shot until the autopsy was performed yesterday afternoon."There was a lot of blood, but we assumed it was from his head hitting the windshield," said Detective Donald Worden of the homicide unit.
NEWS
January 9, 2004
The FBI announced yesterday plans to return a historic sword that once belonged to a Civil War captain to the U.S. Naval Academy Museum, where it was housed until it was reported missing in 1931. Bureau officials will be in Annapolis on Monday to return the sword, a gift from the state of New York to Capt. John Lorimer Worden. He commanded the USS Monitor in the 1862 naval battle with the CSS Virginia, a Confederate warship better known as the Merrimack. Worden died in 1897, leaving the Tiffany & Co. sword to his son. He donated it to the museum in 1912.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 11, 2003
The Polish phantasmagoria The Saragossa Manuscript would be a perfect midnight movie if it weren't three hours long. Luckily, the Charles' Saturday revival series will screen it tomorrow at noon. The movie is an epic piece of japery: It celebrates visions and magic with the sort of labyrinthine storytelling that bends minds with its own twisted sorcery. Flashbacks within flashbacks make up the story, catalyzed when two soldiers on opposite sides of an unexplained, early 19th-century war stumble upon a manuscript that transfixes them with potent, sexy words and images.
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