Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWord Processor
IN THE NEWS

Word Processor

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | September 6, 1993
If you're heading off to college with a new computer (or you're a parent who just made the investment for your son or daughter), chances are you spent a lot more time worrying about the new hardware than the software that runs on it.Before the school year gets too far along, it's a good idea to take a look at the software you're using and see if it meets your needs. If it doesn't, a visit to the college bookstore can turn up some real bargains in top-of-the-line programs, thanks to publishers who are willing to take lower profits today in an effort to hook tomorrow's corporate PC users.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | October 26, 2006
The millennium was a decade away when Tony Kushner wrote Angels in America. His wildly imaginative work warned of the dangers of big government, disease, addiction, bigotry and of ignoring civic and interpersonal responsibilities. A half dozen years into the new millennium, the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre has produced Millennium Approaches, Part 1 of Kushner's megawork (the same director and cast return in June with Part 2, Perestroika). Although the gutsy production is uneven, much of Kushner's writing sounds startlingly current.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 1, 1993
There is no such thing as the final word in word processing software. The three leading programs for Windows computers -- Microsoft Word, Wordperfect and Ami Pro -- regularly leapfrog one another with new and better features.This month, after two years of development, both Microsoft Word and Wordperfect hopped up with new versions.It is always difficult to choose a winner in word processing software, simply because all three of the leading programs are so good. In this latest round, the good get better.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 2001
Is there a way to change the default font in Microsoft Word? Your answer and a warning: Be careful because you can mess up your word processor if you goof. You need to find the template file for Word called normal.dot. It sets the default settings that come up when the word processor is used. Click on Start and pick Find Files and Folders. Type in the search term "Templates" and aim the search at your computer's C: drive. When the folder icon for Templates comes up, click on Open and then on the normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2001
Is there a way to alphabetize in Microsoft Word? For example, if I typed a list consisting of the names White, Smith, Jones, etc., how can I put these in alphabetical order? The ability to sort selected lines in documents is an important tool for many specialized users of word processing software. And as you note, even ordinary folks would like the option of sorting lists either upward or downward from time to time. This allows one to let the word processor do the sorting instead of figuring things out as we type.
NEWS
February 1, 1996
PoliceLinwood: A resident of McKinstrys Mill Road reported to state police that someone broke into his home between Jan. 22 and 29 and stole a facsimile machine, word processor, watch and sports equipment. Total loss was $3,867.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | October 4, 1999
When I start to type in a address of a Web site I want to visit in Microsoft Internet Explorer, after every letter that I punch the browser displays a directory of past sites I have visited that start with those letters. This is extremely aggravating as I look at the screen as I type and get distracted. Can I get rid of this?What you hate, others love. To repeat a computer industry cliche, that's not a bug -- it's a feature. Software engineers spent a lot of time rigging things so that as you start to type an Internet address into the browser it automatically displays past addresses starting with those letters, so that when you see one you want you can simply hit the Tab key and Enter to jump back to that site.
BUSINESS
By L.R. Shannon | March 17, 1997
SOFTWARE suites, collections of major programs sold together, have been the rage for the past few years.For less than the total price of the components purchased separately, you get a top-of-the-line word processor, spreadsheet, database and other programs.The collections make sense for large offices, although it is difficult to imagine one person mastering Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and Powerpoint, to pick examples from the Microsoft Office suite.For small offices, home offices or just plain homes, integrated programs such as Microsoft Works or Clarisworks make more sense.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | March 11, 1991
WHETHER YOU'RE WRITING a letter to Aunt Rhoda, a repor for the boss or a doctoral thesis, you know what it's like to struggle with misspelled words, dangling participles, misplaced antecedents or a search for exactly the right word.But if you write with a personal computer, assistance can be onl a keystroke away.Every word processing program worth its salt has a built-ispelling checker, and the better ones have a thesaurus. Wordsmiths who need industrial-strength help can turn to style and grammar checkers, complete on-line dictionaries and a variety of reference books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 19, 2000
I am having big troubles moving some very big word processing files from my old computer onto an IBM Aptiva with Windows 98 installed. Do I need a Zip Drive? I have just a floppy and a CD drive. Instead of a $150 Zip drive, you can use for free a piece of shareware called WinZip 8.0 to crunch that fat word processing file small enough that you can copy it to a floppy on the old computer and then move it to the new one. WinZip can squeeze certain files (particularly straight word processor documents)
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2001
Is there a way to alphabetize in Microsoft Word? For example, if I typed a list consisting of the names White, Smith, Jones, etc., how can I put these in alphabetical order? The ability to sort selected lines in documents is an important tool for many specialized users of word processing software. And as you note, even ordinary folks would like the option of sorting lists either upward or downward from time to time. This allows one to let the word processor do the sorting instead of figuring things out as we type.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 19, 2000
I am having big troubles moving some very big word processing files from my old computer onto an IBM Aptiva with Windows 98 installed. Do I need a Zip Drive? I have just a floppy and a CD drive. Instead of a $150 Zip drive, you can use for free a piece of shareware called WinZip 8.0 to crunch that fat word processing file small enough that you can copy it to a floppy on the old computer and then move it to the new one. WinZip can squeeze certain files (particularly straight word processor documents)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 2000
If your television broke down as often as most computers do, you'd have a lot more quality time to spend with your family. I get a lot of e-mail from across the country, half of which asks for advice on how to fix something that has gone wrong with a computer. I'm not a computer genius, but even if I were, I'd have a hard time fixing these problems remotely. I'm in the same position as an auto mechanic who receives a phone call demanding to know what's wrong when the family car makes a chugga-woo-cher-cuck noise as it goes up steep hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | October 4, 1999
When I start to type in a address of a Web site I want to visit in Microsoft Internet Explorer, after every letter that I punch the browser displays a directory of past sites I have visited that start with those letters. This is extremely aggravating as I look at the screen as I type and get distracted. Can I get rid of this?What you hate, others love. To repeat a computer industry cliche, that's not a bug -- it's a feature. Software engineers spent a lot of time rigging things so that as you start to type an Internet address into the browser it automatically displays past addresses starting with those letters, so that when you see one you want you can simply hit the Tab key and Enter to jump back to that site.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOEL BRINKLEY and JOEL BRINKLEY,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1998
When employees of the New York state attorney general's office prepared the final draft of the multistate lawsuit accusing Microsoft Corp. of monopolistic behavior, they typed the document using Microsoft Word, the word processor installed on the office's computers as part of a group of business programs known as Office."
BUSINESS
By L.R. Shannon | March 17, 1997
SOFTWARE suites, collections of major programs sold together, have been the rage for the past few years.For less than the total price of the components purchased separately, you get a top-of-the-line word processor, spreadsheet, database and other programs.The collections make sense for large offices, although it is difficult to imagine one person mastering Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and Powerpoint, to pick examples from the Microsoft Office suite.For small offices, home offices or just plain homes, integrated programs such as Microsoft Works or Clarisworks make more sense.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1992
Students who register for an English composition course at Essex Community College may find themselves learning to use a computer instead of writing essays during the first few weeks of class.But despite the time spent on computer training, these students still have to write 8 to 10 essays of three to five pages each during the semester. And they just might find that they've done more writing than they would have in a class without access to computers."I think we get more done in these classes," says Linda Hummel, an instructor of English who uses computers to teach students at Essex.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | July 26, 1993
Your small business may not be a multimillion dollar operation, but it can look like one if you have a laser printer and you're willing to invest a little time and a few bucks in some nifty tools and materials designed to level the playing field in the all-important game of first impressions.Some of the best of these tools come from an outfit called Paper Direct in Lyndhurst, N.J., which has carved a niche for itself by supplying exotic, high-quality papers -- many preprinted with brilliant, four-color designs, insignia, washes and borders -- in quantities small enough for small business and professional budgets.
NEWS
February 1, 1996
PoliceLinwood: A resident of McKinstrys Mill Road reported to state police that someone broke into his home between Jan. 22 and 29 and stole a facsimile machine, word processor, watch and sports equipment. Total loss was $3,867.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | February 7, 1994
While we use computers for many different things, almost all )) of us use them for word processing.Whether we're churning out personal notes, business letters, fliers, reports, novels, instruction manuals, newsletters or academic papers, there's a word processor or add-on tool to make our work easier -- or at least more productive.Any child who can learn the keyboard will be able to use a !B standard word processor -- after a fashion -- but those adult tools are often too stuffy, complicated and intimidating to make youngsters comfortable enough to want to write.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.