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By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Amid all the speculation about what Bill Clinton will do when he leaves the presidency, here's a fresh suggestion: Why not make him the next host of that most popular of television word games, "Wheel of Fortune"? Nobody has a more winning personality on the tube, and playing word games is one of his specialties. He's at it again in his defense against the recommendation of an ethics committee of the Arkansas Supreme Court that he be disbarred from practicing law in his home state for "serious misconduct" in his testimony in the Paula Jones case.
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NEWS
September 3, 2011
Nobody likes to be inconvenienced with power outages. Of course it is hard, but in a case like this you can't expect the power companies to fix everything immediately. It amazes me that they can clear up all those trees, debris and downed lines as quickly as they do. We should be glad if we only have the problem of no power and that our homes aren't completely destroyed. The Carr family ("Four days without juice, too much time spent in Panera," Sept. 1) should be glad they had a generator and not complain that it made it hard for their son to sleep.
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NEWS
September 9, 2001
Editor's Note: Today Jerdine Nolen shows you the hidden benefits of word games. People love to have fun with each other. A regular dose of laughter is healthy for the psyche and the soul. Some forms of entertainment can help with language development. Besides being fun, word games and riddles help increase vocabulary and verbal fluency -- and they can be carried along on long driving trips. Riddles can be based on themes like sports (baseball and football are popular choices in these parts)
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2010
S ometimes I just have to take a break from the incredible stress that comes from my job as a weekly humor columnist. Often, I'll play a quick game of "Text Twist" on the computer. The object of this free online game is to beat the clock by rearranging random letters to create as many words as you can, so you proceed to the next level and amass points. Some of you may prefer backgammon, or FreeCell, or setting up house with The Sims, but I'll bet you've got some sort of diversion bookmarked.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Welcome back, students. We're sure you had a wonderful summer, but it's important to remember that, as of this moment, your summer is extremely over. It's a new school year, so we're going to jump right in. Please pay attention. Eyes up here. Time to wake up your beach-addled brains with a memory game. Elementary school teachers often use mnemonics, which is just a strange-looking word for a system or method designed to aid the memory. So, which mnemonic device will we be creating today?
NEWS
September 3, 2011
Nobody likes to be inconvenienced with power outages. Of course it is hard, but in a case like this you can't expect the power companies to fix everything immediately. It amazes me that they can clear up all those trees, debris and downed lines as quickly as they do. We should be glad if we only have the problem of no power and that our homes aren't completely destroyed. The Carr family ("Four days without juice, too much time spent in Panera," Sept. 1) should be glad they had a generator and not complain that it made it hard for their son to sleep.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
They look at "Baltimore" and see "labor it me." The National Puzzlers' League, the world's oldest and best-known group of wordplay experts, held its annual convention this weekend at the Tremont Grand on Charles Street. Led by puzzle-celeb Will Shortz, who edits The New York Times' crossword and hosts a weekly segment on National Public Radio, about 160 attendees binged on palindromes, anagrams, poetry and other word games. Witty handles replace full names. Shortz, a member since 1972, is "WILLz" - wordplay itself ("short" z)
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1998
JOHN M. MORSE WANTS to have a word with you. If you have access to the Internet, he'll offer it for free.Morse is president of Merriam-Webster Inc., publisher of dictionaries and other reference works. He was in Baltimore last week for an unusual book-signing -- unusual in that Morse could not possibly be the author of the century-old Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary.The 1998 version of the book contains 160,000 words and 215,000 definitions in 1,557 pages. It's yours for $24.95. Its "author," of course, is our forebears and all of us who keep inventing words and recommending them to Merriam-Webster's "definers" in Springfield, Mass.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 4, 1991
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:B. E. Earp, Towson: Is Governor William Donald Schaefer so vain that he insists on being called by his full name? All other governors were simply "Hughes, Mandel, Agnew, McKeldin," etc.COMMENT: The governor does not insist on the use of his full name. Such use is a habit of the press and one which the governor does not endorse. In fact, he would prefer to be called by his high school nickname: Rhett Butler Schaefer.Name Withheld, Baltimore: The attached is the last page of a "Flash Report" that is circulated among MTA employees.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2010
S ometimes I just have to take a break from the incredible stress that comes from my job as a weekly humor columnist. Often, I'll play a quick game of "Text Twist" on the computer. The object of this free online game is to beat the clock by rearranging random letters to create as many words as you can, so you proceed to the next level and amass points. Some of you may prefer backgammon, or FreeCell, or setting up house with The Sims, but I'll bet you've got some sort of diversion bookmarked.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
They look at "Baltimore" and see "labor it me." The National Puzzlers' League, the world's oldest and best-known group of wordplay experts, held its annual convention this weekend at the Tremont Grand on Charles Street. Led by puzzle-celeb Will Shortz, who edits The New York Times' crossword and hosts a weekly segment on National Public Radio, about 160 attendees binged on palindromes, anagrams, poetry and other word games. Witty handles replace full names. Shortz, a member since 1972, is "WILLz" - wordplay itself ("short" z)
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | August 27, 2007
Welcome back, students. We're sure you had a wonderful summer, but it's important to remember that, as of this moment, your summer is extremely over. It's a new school year, so we're going to jump right in. Please pay attention. Eyes up here. Time to wake up your beach-addled brains with a memory game. Elementary school teachers often use mnemonics, which is just a strange-looking word for a system or method designed to aid the memory. So, which mnemonic device will we be creating today?
NEWS
June 27, 2006
Mary Clayton Hall, a homemaker and a longtime College Park resident, died of pneumonia Sunday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. She was 88. She was born and raised Mary Clayton Williams in Powhatan, Va. She earned a degree in business administration in 1939 from what is now the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Va., and during World War II worked for the Army in Richmond, Va. She was married in 1945 to Thomas W. Hall, a French professor at...
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | April 11, 2006
The cafeteria of Our Lady of Victory School in Arbutus was home to a different kind of bingo during a recent visit. Children gathered around Scrabble boards instead of cards and ink blotters. Teacher Sharon Mosher spoke into a wireless microphone when they spelled words such as goblets or tsunami. And teams that used seven letters in one turn - known as a "bingo" - earned a 50-point bonus. "Our first bingo of the day is reaping," she proclaimed. "You reap what you sow." For about six years, Mosher has sown a healthy crop of fans of the game.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2005
Maryland is the "global hotspot for biotechnology," the state's secretary of business and economic development told a group visiting from India last month. "I made it up this morning," Aris Melissaratos acknowledged, shortly after the meeting in Montgomery County. But it could be true, he added, if you use the right justification. Building a biotech economy sometimes seems more about artful articulation than actual science. Competition for the industry is stiff, and state and country officials aren't above manipulating details to improve their home turf's place on the biotech battlefield.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexandra Fenwick and Alexandra Fenwick,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
There are probably a lot of things at the downtown Whole Foods Market that you didn't know existed. A basket full of green, scaly monster fruit sits in the produce section, the beverage aisle houses six-packs of gluten-free, organic black cherry soda, and over in the cafe area people are talking about something called "milneb." The deluxe grocery store specializes in all things obscure, exotic and hard-to-find and, today, words are no exception. "It's a kind of fungicide," explains Jeffrey Veigel of Charles Village, as he slides the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary across the table so another player can see for herself.
NEWS
June 27, 2006
Mary Clayton Hall, a homemaker and a longtime College Park resident, died of pneumonia Sunday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. She was 88. She was born and raised Mary Clayton Williams in Powhatan, Va. She earned a degree in business administration in 1939 from what is now the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Va., and during World War II worked for the Army in Richmond, Va. She was married in 1945 to Thomas W. Hall, a French professor at...
NEWS
September 9, 2001
Editor's Note: Today Jerdine Nolen shows you the hidden benefits of word games. People love to have fun with each other. A regular dose of laughter is healthy for the psyche and the soul. Some forms of entertainment can help with language development. Besides being fun, word games and riddles help increase vocabulary and verbal fluency -- and they can be carried along on long driving trips. Riddles can be based on themes like sports (baseball and football are popular choices in these parts)
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