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By --Compiled by Dolly Merritt | July 20, 1991
Around the house* When washing dishes, work from the least soiled item to the most heavily soiled. Glassware should be hand-washed first, then silverware, dishes and serving pieces. Pots and pans should be cleaned last.* Clean copper items in a hurry: Rub a bit of ketchup or Worcestershire sauce on the surface; the acids will remove tarnish.In the garden* Remove faded flowers every few days to encourage plants to produce more flowers.
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By ROB KASPER | March 15, 2003
BORED WITH routine maintenance, I recently tried cleaning with condiments. I polished some soiled brass with a cloth dabbed in Worcestershire sauce, then tried to spiff more dirty brass with a shot of ketchup. Yes, it has been a long, dark winter. Ever since a couple of years ago, when I removed a water spot on tabletop by applying a dab of toothpaste, I have been drawn to the concept of pulling materials from the "wrong" household cabinets to get a job done. So this week when I found myself both with some tarnished brass and some time on my hands, I searched the pantry cabinets for cleaning agents.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 15, 2003
BORED WITH routine maintenance, I recently tried cleaning with condiments. I polished some soiled brass with a cloth dabbed in Worcestershire sauce, then tried to spiff more dirty brass with a shot of ketchup. Yes, it has been a long, dark winter. Ever since a couple of years ago, when I removed a water spot on tabletop by applying a dab of toothpaste, I have been drawn to the concept of pulling materials from the "wrong" household cabinets to get a job done. So this week when I found myself both with some tarnished brass and some time on my hands, I searched the pantry cabinets for cleaning agents.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | July 15, 2001
I HAVE ABOUT a zillion cookbooks. But the other day I came across one that contained everything I need to know about barbecue sauces. Moreover, I could hold this book in the palm of my hand. It is called "The Best Little BBQ Sauces Cookbook" by Karen Adler. The book is six inches tall and five inches wide and costs five bucks. It is one of a series of four little books on barbecuing and grilling published by Celestial Arts in Berkeley, Calif. "It is designed as a gift book," Adler told me over the telephone.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1994
In the Fast & Fresh column in Wednesday's A La Carte section, it was unclear which dish the carrots, raisins, mayonnaise and lemon juice were for. They are the ingredients ** for a carrot-raisin salad to accompany the tuna casserole.The Sun regrets the error.That old standby, tuna noodle casserole, is one of those comfy convenient dishes that's remained a family classic. The original version could use some calorie trimming, however, so we've come up with a delicious new variation that's so simple, even the kids can help.
FEATURES
January 16, 1991
Garlic, Cheese and Pimento Bread 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese1/2 cup ricotta cheese2 medium cloves garlic, peeled and forced through a press2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley1 teaspoon dried Italian herbs, crushed1/4 teaspoon salt1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperL 1 (7-ounce) can whole pimentos, drained and coarsely chopped1 (11-inch) loaf French bread, cut in half lengthwiseCombine the mozzarella and ricotta cheeses, the garlic, parsley, Italian herbs, salt, pepper and pimentos.
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | June 2, 1991
Though seedier and more touristy than ever, New Orlean remains a great town for food lovers. The problem: choosing from among the Creole, Cajun, French and American restaurants and the various celebrity chefs who ply their trade there.On a recent visit, I opted for Emeril's, named America's best new restaurant in John Mariani's Esquire magazine survey last year. Its personable and talented proprietor, Emeril Lagasse, serves what he calls "real food, food that reflects the best the city has to offer."
FEATURES
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
The grilling season is well under way, and Shirley Raines of Baltimore has been waiting patiently for a recipe for a whiskey barbecue sauce made with Jack Daniels.Many readers responded and below are two that our food testers at the Baltimore International Culinary College found to be the best.Margaret Smyth of Glenwood says she uses this recipe on spareribs on the grill or in the oven.Barbecue sauce with Jack Daniels1 tablespoon butter1/3 cup chopped onion1 cup ketchup1/2 cup water1/4 cup fresh lemon juice2 tablespoon cider vinegar2 tablespoon Jack Daniels whiskey2 tablespoon light brown sugar1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce1/2 teaspoon chili powder1/4 teaspoon pepperMelt butter, add onion and cook until wilted.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Rector and Sylvia Rector,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 1997
Across America this spring and summer, millions of steaks will hiss and sizzle over the glowing coals of outdoor grills. Some will become memorable entrees. Others will meet unfortunate ends.Nearly all of us think we can cook a steak, no matter how limited our other culinary skills. But the steak requires finesse.It's a matter of perfect timing -- the real key to success. It's matching the cut to the right cooking technique. It's mastering the broiler and the braising pan and the heavy-duty ridged skillet.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | July 15, 2001
I HAVE ABOUT a zillion cookbooks. But the other day I came across one that contained everything I need to know about barbecue sauces. Moreover, I could hold this book in the palm of my hand. It is called "The Best Little BBQ Sauces Cookbook" by Karen Adler. The book is six inches tall and five inches wide and costs five bucks. It is one of a series of four little books on barbecuing and grilling published by Celestial Arts in Berkeley, Calif. "It is designed as a gift book," Adler told me over the telephone.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Rector and Sylvia Rector,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 1997
Across America this spring and summer, millions of steaks will hiss and sizzle over the glowing coals of outdoor grills. Some will become memorable entrees. Others will meet unfortunate ends.Nearly all of us think we can cook a steak, no matter how limited our other culinary skills. But the steak requires finesse.It's a matter of perfect timing -- the real key to success. It's matching the cut to the right cooking technique. It's mastering the broiler and the braising pan and the heavy-duty ridged skillet.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | January 26, 1994
In the Fast & Fresh column in Wednesday's A La Carte section, it was unclear which dish the carrots, raisins, mayonnaise and lemon juice were for. They are the ingredients ** for a carrot-raisin salad to accompany the tuna casserole.The Sun regrets the error.That old standby, tuna noodle casserole, is one of those comfy convenient dishes that's remained a family classic. The original version could use some calorie trimming, however, so we've come up with a delicious new variation that's so simple, even the kids can help.
FEATURES
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
The grilling season is well under way, and Shirley Raines of Baltimore has been waiting patiently for a recipe for a whiskey barbecue sauce made with Jack Daniels.Many readers responded and below are two that our food testers at the Baltimore International Culinary College found to be the best.Margaret Smyth of Glenwood says she uses this recipe on spareribs on the grill or in the oven.Barbecue sauce with Jack Daniels1 tablespoon butter1/3 cup chopped onion1 cup ketchup1/2 cup water1/4 cup fresh lemon juice2 tablespoon cider vinegar2 tablespoon Jack Daniels whiskey2 tablespoon light brown sugar1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce1/2 teaspoon chili powder1/4 teaspoon pepperMelt butter, add onion and cook until wilted.
FEATURES
By --Compiled by Dolly Merritt | July 20, 1991
Around the house* When washing dishes, work from the least soiled item to the most heavily soiled. Glassware should be hand-washed first, then silverware, dishes and serving pieces. Pots and pans should be cleaned last.* Clean copper items in a hurry: Rub a bit of ketchup or Worcestershire sauce on the surface; the acids will remove tarnish.In the garden* Remove faded flowers every few days to encourage plants to produce more flowers.
FEATURES
By Gail Forman | June 2, 1991
Though seedier and more touristy than ever, New Orlean remains a great town for food lovers. The problem: choosing from among the Creole, Cajun, French and American restaurants and the various celebrity chefs who ply their trade there.On a recent visit, I opted for Emeril's, named America's best new restaurant in John Mariani's Esquire magazine survey last year. Its personable and talented proprietor, Emeril Lagasse, serves what he calls "real food, food that reflects the best the city has to offer."
FEATURES
January 16, 1991
Garlic, Cheese and Pimento Bread 1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese1/2 cup ricotta cheese2 medium cloves garlic, peeled and forced through a press2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley1 teaspoon dried Italian herbs, crushed1/4 teaspoon salt1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperL 1 (7-ounce) can whole pimentos, drained and coarsely chopped1 (11-inch) loaf French bread, cut in half lengthwiseCombine the mozzarella and ricotta cheeses, the garlic, parsley, Italian herbs, salt, pepper and pimentos.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | May 23, 2007
I have a problem with crab cakes. I have been using the recipe on the back of the Old Bay Seasoning container, and the cakes always fall apart. I've tried more/less eggs, more/less bread, more/less crab, etc. Crab cakes present all sorts of frying problems because of their moist constitution and irregular surface. I am ever mindful of the sage advice of my cooking idol, Marcella Hazan: "Wet things won't brown." To that, I add: "Wet things won't allow the formation of a sturdy enough crust to keep the thing from falling apart."
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
The folks at Aramark sent over some game-day recipes from M&T Bank Stadium's Executive Chef Joe Bachman . There was one for Maryland crab cakes, another for pit beef sandwiches, but I thou ght you'd want to see the one for Maryland Crab Tots. Headquartered in Philadelphia, Aramark is the exclusive food and beverage partner for M&T Bank Stadium. Here's the recipe for Maryland Crab Tots from M&T Bank Stadium: •    2 pounds tots (any supermarket brand will do)
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