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By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2005
Researchers say they have sequenced the chemical structure of about 1 percent of the genetic material of the woolly mammoth, an Ice Age cousin of today's elephants. In the largest project to analyze the genetics of an extinct creature, scientists extracted DNA from remains found in permafrost. They identified the precise sequence of about 13 million chemical units within the mammoth's DNA, according to the study released today in the journal Science. The researchers report that almost 99 percent of the DNA sequenced was identical to that of modern elephants.
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By Michael Sragow | July 3, 2009
Public Enemies *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS ) Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Depression bank robber John Dillinger ( Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Depp goes all the way with the role of a wry, wily Midwesterner. He really nails this character - the scion of an age of speed who says he wants "everything" and wants it "right now."
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FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 23, 2006
Washington's Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company has a reputation for defying convention in its edgy stage productions, and that approach carries through to the design of its new home as well. After performing in rented spaces for 25 years, the theater company moved in 2005 to its first permanent home, part of the Lafayette at Penn Quarter development in the city's growing arts and theater district. What makes the theater unconventional is how much the back-of-the-house aspects - including a classroom, rehearsal hall, cafe and offices - are integrated with the performing spaces, and the way new and "found" elements were juxtaposed to create one energetic composition.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
The relentlessly gimmicky use of 3-D in Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs helps reduce what could have been a genial piece of slapstick into a cartoon that's not just in-your-face, but in-your-eyeballs. You should have been able to treat this film as a grab-bag and pull out some plums. Instead it goes grabbing after you. The film doesn't hurl things at the camera in the manner of Monsters vs. Aliens. But any snout, tongue or tail that lends itself to stretching and snapping gets quite a workout in this movie.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | September 5, 2007
A series of wooden African masks hangs on the walls of a handsome colonial home in an unnamed country in Western Africa. The mouths and eyes are carved in formal expressions of horror and surprise. How fitting. If you go The Unmentionables runs at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D St. N.W. through Sept. 30. Show times: 8 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m., 7 p.m. Sundays. Tickets cost $32-$52. Call 202-393-3939 or go to woollymammoth.net.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 28, 1999
MOSCOW -- The most famous woolly mammoth of 1999 spent its life on the now-vanished grasslands of northern Siberia, fell dead one winter's day at the age of 47, tumbled part way down a stream bank, and spent most or all of the next 20,000 years frozen solid.Lots of woolly mammoths suffered the same fate. As the species became extinct, thousands more simply died, rotted and left their skeletons behind; trawlers on the North Sea haul up mammoth bones all the time in their nets.But this is the first mammoth to be dug out of the permafrost still frozen, and it is the only one excavated in front of the cameras of French television and the Discovery Channel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | December 27, 2007
At the age of 26, Josh Lefkowitz has already written and performed two one-man shows about his life, and is bringing his newest work, Now What? to Center Stage on Wednesday through Jan. 20. Now What? -- which explores the performer's relationship with his girlfriend and his art -- is a sequel to Help Wanted: A Personal Search for Meaningful Employment at the Start of the 21st Century, his humorous take on his own job-hunting experiences. Lefkowitz, who will perform the 85-minute show without a script or even notes, described Now What?
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | November 25, 1993
Imagine hunting a woolly mammoth with a prehistoric weapon, resting on animal furs inside a tepee, and sharing your bed with insects.That's what 750 students at Elkridge Elementary School did this week, with the help of "living historian" Harold Dellenger 3rd, of York, Pa."It's living history," said Amy Plotnick, a resource teacher who works with gifted and talented students and helped organize the three-day program, which ended yesterday.Using artifacts, ancient weapons, and props such as a tepee 16 feet in diameter, Mr. Dellenger made history come alive for students in a program funded by the school's PTA."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 15, 2002
The most engaging character in the animated feature Ice Age is Scrat, a half-squirrel, half-rat creature. He scrambles across frigid prehistoric North America, trying to locate a stable piece of ice into which he can jam an acorn for storage. With curved fangs, enormous googly eyes, and hands and feet that alternately extend like a ballerina's or claw frozen surfaces like rusty ice picks, Scrat perfectly embodies hysteria. Desperation is his emotional base; any respite he wins is momentary.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2001
HER BUSINESS CARD reads "Jane Tukarski, Scrimshander." Scrimshander? The word requires a trip to a dictionary, a large dictionary. A scrimshander is someone who works on scrimshaw. Scrimshaw? It's something engraved, usually very small, on ivory or similar surface. The origins of scrimshaw, Tukarski said, are uniquely American. "It's the oldest solely indigenous American folk art, except for Native American art," she said. "It dates back to the Yankee whaling period, to 18th- and 19th-century New England, places like Nantucket.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | December 27, 2007
At the age of 26, Josh Lefkowitz has already written and performed two one-man shows about his life, and is bringing his newest work, Now What? to Center Stage on Wednesday through Jan. 20. Now What? -- which explores the performer's relationship with his girlfriend and his art -- is a sequel to Help Wanted: A Personal Search for Meaningful Employment at the Start of the 21st Century, his humorous take on his own job-hunting experiences. Lefkowitz, who will perform the 85-minute show without a script or even notes, described Now What?
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | September 5, 2007
A series of wooden African masks hangs on the walls of a handsome colonial home in an unnamed country in Western Africa. The mouths and eyes are carved in formal expressions of horror and surprise. How fitting. If you go The Unmentionables runs at Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D St. N.W. through Sept. 30. Show times: 8 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays; 2 p.m., 7 p.m. Sundays. Tickets cost $32-$52. Call 202-393-3939 or go to woollymammoth.net.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | January 23, 2006
Washington's Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company has a reputation for defying convention in its edgy stage productions, and that approach carries through to the design of its new home as well. After performing in rented spaces for 25 years, the theater company moved in 2005 to its first permanent home, part of the Lafayette at Penn Quarter development in the city's growing arts and theater district. What makes the theater unconventional is how much the back-of-the-house aspects - including a classroom, rehearsal hall, cafe and offices - are integrated with the performing spaces, and the way new and "found" elements were juxtaposed to create one energetic composition.
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 2005
Researchers say they have sequenced the chemical structure of about 1 percent of the genetic material of the woolly mammoth, an Ice Age cousin of today's elephants. In the largest project to analyze the genetics of an extinct creature, scientists extracted DNA from remains found in permafrost. They identified the precise sequence of about 13 million chemical units within the mammoth's DNA, according to the study released today in the journal Science. The researchers report that almost 99 percent of the DNA sequenced was identical to that of modern elephants.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 15, 2002
The most engaging character in the animated feature Ice Age is Scrat, a half-squirrel, half-rat creature. He scrambles across frigid prehistoric North America, trying to locate a stable piece of ice into which he can jam an acorn for storage. With curved fangs, enormous googly eyes, and hands and feet that alternately extend like a ballerina's or claw frozen surfaces like rusty ice picks, Scrat perfectly embodies hysteria. Desperation is his emotional base; any respite he wins is momentary.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2001
HER BUSINESS CARD reads "Jane Tukarski, Scrimshander." Scrimshander? The word requires a trip to a dictionary, a large dictionary. A scrimshander is someone who works on scrimshaw. Scrimshaw? It's something engraved, usually very small, on ivory or similar surface. The origins of scrimshaw, Tukarski said, are uniquely American. "It's the oldest solely indigenous American folk art, except for Native American art," she said. "It dates back to the Yankee whaling period, to 18th- and 19th-century New England, places like Nantucket.
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2001
SAN FRANCISCO -- It took just 21 seconds, one bang of a wooden mallet at the venerable Butterfields auction house on a recent day and "Reina," a diminutive, 74 million-year-old Leptoceratops had reached its highest bid: $75,000. Although such transactions occur quietly, controversy surrounding them does not: The growing sales of natural-history objects -- from trilobites and meteorites to entire dinosaur skeletons -- is stirring up museums, universities and auction houses. Reina, the most controversial item offered, was not sold that day because the $75,000 offered did not top the owner's minimum bid of $120,000.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | July 3, 2009
Public Enemies *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS ) Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Depression bank robber John Dillinger ( Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Depp goes all the way with the role of a wry, wily Midwesterner. He really nails this character - the scion of an age of speed who says he wants "everything" and wants it "right now."
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2001
SAN FRANCISCO -- It took just 21 seconds, one bang of a wooden mallet at the venerable Butterfields auction house on a recent day and "Reina," a diminutive, 74 million-year-old Leptoceratops had reached its highest bid: $75,000. Although such transactions occur quietly, controversy surrounding them does not: The growing sales of natural-history objects -- from trilobites and meteorites to entire dinosaur skeletons -- is stirring up museums, universities and auction houses. Reina, the most controversial item offered, was not sold that day because the $75,000 offered did not top the owner's minimum bid of $120,000.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 28, 1999
MOSCOW -- The most famous woolly mammoth of 1999 spent its life on the now-vanished grasslands of northern Siberia, fell dead one winter's day at the age of 47, tumbled part way down a stream bank, and spent most or all of the next 20,000 years frozen solid.Lots of woolly mammoths suffered the same fate. As the species became extinct, thousands more simply died, rotted and left their skeletons behind; trawlers on the North Sea haul up mammoth bones all the time in their nets.But this is the first mammoth to be dug out of the permafrost still frozen, and it is the only one excavated in front of the cameras of French television and the Discovery Channel.
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