Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWoody Guthrie
IN THE NEWS

Woody Guthrie

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
Nearly a decade ago, Michael Patrick Flanagan Smith, a Frederick-born playwright, actor and musician who called Baltimore home for several years, began digging into the life of Woody Guthrie. The fruits of that exploration are now onstage in New York. "Woody Guthrie Dreams" opened a three-week run Thursday off-off Broadway at the Theater for the New City. It remains to be seen if the play has the legs to move later to off-Broadway or maybe even the Great White Way itself. "I'd be lying if I said it doesn't cross my mind sometimes," Smith said with a slight laugh by phone from New York.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2011
Nearly a decade ago, Michael Patrick Flanagan Smith, a Frederick-born playwright, actor and musician who called Baltimore home for several years, began digging into the life of Woody Guthrie. The fruits of that exploration are now onstage in New York. "Woody Guthrie Dreams" opened a three-week run Thursday off-off Broadway at the Theater for the New City. It remains to be seen if the play has the legs to move later to off-Broadway or maybe even the Great White Way itself. "I'd be lying if I said it doesn't cross my mind sometimes," Smith said with a slight laugh by phone from New York.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
The young actress steps in front of the stage in the basement hall at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church and recites the first speech of a new play: "October 3, 1967. Queens, New York. A man lays in bed in Creedmore State Hospital. His entire body is shaking almost imperceptibly like a dry leaf in a slow wind. Woody Guthrie is dying. But he is also dreaming." Woody Guthrie (1912-1967), the prolific poet-troubadour of Dust Bowl America, died of Huntington's chorea, a hereditary and progressive neurological disorder, the disease that killed his mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2008
When Jonatha Brooke was invited out of the blue to openly peruse the Woody Guthrie Archives, the veteran folk-pop artist was pleasantly surprised. But when she was offered the opportunity to create songs around the folk legend's previously unreleased lyrics, she was understandably intimidated. Guthrie's daughter Nora, who oversees the archives, was warmly supportive of the singer-songwriter, and Brooke eventually eased into the project. The first female artist given free creative reign over Guthrie's works, she crafted kaleidoscopic, jazz-kissed arrangements around the songwriter's often-poetic lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 2005
HE WANTED TO GO HOME, so to speak. After seven years of highly experimental solo work, singer-songwriter-musician Jay Farrar decided to reassemble his critically acclaimed alternative country-rock band, Son Volt. On the new album, Okemah and the Melody of Riot, he reminds fans of the band's past glory while showcasing progressive musical and lyrical ideas. The CD appeared in July and garnered enthusiastically positive reviews. "The right mix of pastoral beauty and bar-band swagger," Rolling Stone said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 12, 1997
At first glance, Billy Bragg's latest project seems downright silly. "I've been approached by the Woody Guthrie archive," he says, "to put some Woody Guthrie songs to music."Wait a minute, you think -- put songs to music? Isn't having music what makes a song a song in the first place?Sure it is. But a melody only counts if it has somehow been recorded. And as Bragg points out, that wasn't the case for a lot of Guthrie's music."Woody Guthrie wrote a lot of songs," he says, over the phone from his home in London.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
The American Music and Arts Festival in Westminster tomorrow will be a tuneful reunion for one family that has spawned legends in the folk movement and still reaches into the roots of Americana for its songs. Arlo Guthrie, famed folk musician and son of folk legend Woody Guthrie, will strum his guitar, trill his harmonica and intone storied lyrics. He will indulge the audience with a few father-daughter duets and be feted with a birthday cake, baked in the shape of Alice's Restaurant. "He may forget it's his birthday, but we will remind him," said son-in-law Johnny Irion.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Sun | June 20, 1995
Although Andrew Sachs is much too young to have lived through the Dust Bowl migrations that inspired some of Woody Guthrie's greatest folk songs, this 29-year-old has done his share of traveling from one regional theater to another across the American landscape."
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | May 3, 1995
ALAN GINSBERG speaks with Woody Guthrie from beyond the grave.Mr. Ginsberg is not a psychic. He's an archivist."I really feel like Woody is talking to me," said Mr. Ginsberg, in Baltimore recently to attend a conference of archivists and oral historians. "Working with original documents you get a feel for the guy. In a day, he could knock out four or five short essays on politics, music, something he saw in the street."When the rambling folk singer who composed "This Land Is Your Land" died from Huntington's disease in 1967 at age 55, he left behind a dozen file cabinets of personal material.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2008
When Jonatha Brooke was invited out of the blue to openly peruse the Woody Guthrie Archives, the veteran folk-pop artist was pleasantly surprised. But when she was offered the opportunity to create songs around the folk legend's previously unreleased lyrics, she was understandably intimidated. Guthrie's daughter Nora, who oversees the archives, was warmly supportive of the singer-songwriter, and Brooke eventually eased into the project. The first female artist given free creative reign over Guthrie's works, she crafted kaleidoscopic, jazz-kissed arrangements around the songwriter's often-poetic lyrics.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | June 10, 2007
Carmen Robb, an artist who taught at Towson University for more than three decades and whose work was widely exhibited, died of a lung ailment June 3 at her Ruxton home. She was 70. Born Carmen McDaniel in Kingman, Kan., she earned an art degree at Emporia State University and studied drawing and painting at Pennsylvania State University. She moved to Baltimore in 1965 and joined the Towson art faculty, where she remained until her 1999 retirement. Among her assignments, she taught drawing courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 2005
HE WANTED TO GO HOME, so to speak. After seven years of highly experimental solo work, singer-songwriter-musician Jay Farrar decided to reassemble his critically acclaimed alternative country-rock band, Son Volt. On the new album, Okemah and the Melody of Riot, he reminds fans of the band's past glory while showcasing progressive musical and lyrical ideas. The CD appeared in July and garnered enthusiastically positive reviews. "The right mix of pastoral beauty and bar-band swagger," Rolling Stone said.
NEWS
October 11, 2005
Jerry Juhl, 67, whose Emmy Award-winning Jerry Juhl, 67, whose Emmy Award-winning writing gave life to Jim Henson's whimsically irreverent Muppets on television and film, died from pancreatic cancer Sept. 27 in San Francisco. Mr. Juhl was the head writer for Muppets programs including The Muppet Show on television and, in some capacity, all the Muppet films, from the Muppet Movie in 1979 to Muppets From Space in 1999. The Muppet Show, a vaudeville-like variety show featuring Kermit the Frog and his many friends, was introduced in 1976 and ran until 1981, ultimately reaching more than 100 countries.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
The American Music and Arts Festival in Westminster tomorrow will be a tuneful reunion for one family that has spawned legends in the folk movement and still reaches into the roots of Americana for its songs. Arlo Guthrie, famed folk musician and son of folk legend Woody Guthrie, will strum his guitar, trill his harmonica and intone storied lyrics. He will indulge the audience with a few father-daughter duets and be feted with a birthday cake, baked in the shape of Alice's Restaurant. "He may forget it's his birthday, but we will remind him," said son-in-law Johnny Irion.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 2, 2004
It's too bad that Disney has stupidly positioned America's Heart and Soul, Louis Schwartzberg's documentary cross-section of the 21st-century United States, as its alternative to Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11, thus insuring condescension from many critics. First, the studio refused to release Moore's film (although Miramax, a Disney company, produced it). Then, the studio screened Schwartzberg's film for the conservative group Move America Forward, which has tried to pressure Moore's film off movie screens.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2004
The young actress steps in front of the stage in the basement hall at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church and recites the first speech of a new play: "October 3, 1967. Queens, New York. A man lays in bed in Creedmore State Hospital. His entire body is shaking almost imperceptibly like a dry leaf in a slow wind. Woody Guthrie is dying. But he is also dreaming." Woody Guthrie (1912-1967), the prolific poet-troubadour of Dust Bowl America, died of Huntington's chorea, a hereditary and progressive neurological disorder, the disease that killed his mother.
NEWS
April 24, 1993
"This is not [just] hope for those who are afflicted. This is life," said one woman who suffers from Huntington's disease, upon hearing of the recent discovery of the renegade gene that triggers the malady. Her enthusiasm -- despite the fact that any potential cure is still years or even decades away -- suggests the extent to which this fatal inherited brain disorder blights the lives of families in which the disease has occurred.The genetic discovery, published in the scientific journal Cell, now makes it possible to conduct accurate screening for the gene, thus relieving the suspense of thousands of people at risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 30, 2003
It's a new album full of mostly unheard songs, but Streetcore feels like a career-spanning retrospective for Joe Strummer. With bits of reggae and troubadour folk welded to a rock 'n' roll chassis, Streetcore is a stirring tour of the music Strummer loved best. The iconic former Clash singer died of a heart attack in December in the midst of making the record, so it's impossible to know how he wanted Streetcore to sound. His Mescaleros compatriots have done a fine job assembling the album, though, and here's why: Strummer's passion - for music, for humanity, for life - shows through everywhere, like rays of sunshine breaking through winter cloud cover.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 30, 2003
It's a new album full of mostly unheard songs, but Streetcore feels like a career-spanning retrospective for Joe Strummer. With bits of reggae and troubadour folk welded to a rock 'n' roll chassis, Streetcore is a stirring tour of the music Strummer loved best. The iconic former Clash singer died of a heart attack in December in the midst of making the record, so it's impossible to know how he wanted Streetcore to sound. His Mescaleros compatriots have done a fine job assembling the album, though, and here's why: Strummer's passion - for music, for humanity, for life - shows through everywhere, like rays of sunshine breaking through winter cloud cover.
FEATURES
By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2003
Bernice Johnson Reagon can't remember a time when there wasn't music in her life. "I don't know who I am outside of music," says Reagon, a historian with a doctoral degree from Howard University and founder of the acclaimed a cappella gospel choir Sweet Honey in the Rock. "I was born into a family in southwest Georgia where we used music in games; we sang grace at the table; we listened to it on the radio; we sang in school; we sang in church," Reagon says. "I could hear my mother singing all over the house.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.