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By Mike Giuliano | June 13, 2011
As a European filmmaker, Woody Allen has worked in England, Spain and now France, where his new movie, "Midnight in Paris," serves as a love letter to that city. Next up on his cinematic map will be Rome. Allen is a long way from the overly familiar sidewalk cafes of New York, which helps explain why his career has experienced some much-needed rejuvenation. Although his characters and thematic obsessions haven't changed all that much, the change in photogenic backdrop has been a decided plus.
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NEWS
June 4, 2014
Dan Rodricks called Anthony Brown's "no show" perfectly when he wrote "that was not hibiscus ... that was hubris" ("Really looking forward to the next TV debate," May 31). Of course, Mr. Brown has had some excellent teachers, namely the U.S. Congress! It sealed my vote for the progressive candidate. Mr. Brown did not adhere to Woody Allen's advice that "half of life is just showing up. " Service did not stop with the military; the voters do count. Amy Carroll, Timonium - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg | May 2, 1999
Last week at a Queens, New York auction, fans of filmmaker Woody Allen acquired their own stardust memories. Hundreds of props from his many films were sold off because there was no more room for them in Allen's movie warehouse.Among the interiors and other treasures purchased were shoes from "Deconstructing Harry," mahogany radio consoles from "Radio Days" and a few gaudy sofas from "Bullets Over Broadway."Surprisingly, in a time when "Antiques Roadshow" yokels are told their Charo napkins are worth a mint, none of the cinema tchotchkes required astronomical bids.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
Thank you for printing the full text of David Simon's Georgetown University commencement address. It was the best I have read, excepting Woody Allen's, of course. If Mr. Simon made anyone uncomfortable, good. Because it needed to be said, and it needed to be said now. I thank him for being gutsy enough to say it. Rosellen Fleishman, Baltimore
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
The genius of Woody Allen is amply displayed on TCM tonight."Groundhog Day" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Bill Murray brings an unexpectedly light (for him) touch to this comedy about a man destined to re-live the same day over and over and over again until he gets it right. And what does getting it right mean? That's what he has to find out. Murray's very funny, especially as the realization dawns that this sort of immortality isn't all it's cracked up to be. ABC."Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
ENTERTAINMENT
By SCOTT HETTRICK and SCOTT HETTRICK,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 23, 1992
SHADOWS AND FOG(Orion, 1992) Woody Allen. He cranks out films at about the same clip as Stephen King publishes horror novels. But unlike Mr. King, one never knows what to expect from Mr. Allen. Comedy? Stark drama? Black-and-white or color? Will Mr. Allen be on screen or not?In fact, the most constant element of his 25 films has been the female lead, which one can almost always assume will be whomever Mr. Allen is dating or married to at the time. His former wife, Louise Lasser, co-starred in a couple of his earliest comedies, followed by Diane Keaton in a half-dozen of his finest efforts from 1972 to 1979, and lastly Mia Farrow, who has helped him churn out a new film each year for the past decade.
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By Jack Kroll and Jack Kroll,Newsweek | August 25, 1992
Amid a bombardment of tabloid missiles and an outpouring of accusations and counteraccusations, Woody Allen decided to talk with Newsweek about his relationship with Mia Farrow, with her children and his, and with Soon-Yi. He also responded to the accusations of abuse of his adopted daughter Dylan. Following is an excerpt from the three and a half hour interview in his Fifth Avenue penthouse apartment.Q: The question most people are concerned about is Mia Farrow's charge that you sexually molested Dylan.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
Of Woody Allen's recent films, both Anything Else (2003) and Match Point (2005) showed welcome signs of life, hints of virtuosity and resources yet untapped. So let's assume those, not the tired and resolutely uninvolving Cassandra's Dream, represent Allen at the dawn of the 21st century. Allen's latest, his 42nd effort as a director, is the work of an artist devoid of ideas and energy. Perfunctorily staged and lazily written, it comes to life in only the briefest of spurts, usually when the ever-reliable Tom Wilkinson is on-screen.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Woody Allen plugging a made-for-TV movie?That was the scene here yesterday, as Woody Allen met with TV critics via satellite to promote his first made-for-TV movie, which will air this fall on ABC.Allen directs and stars in the made-for-TV version of his first Broadway play, "Don't Drink The Water," which opened in 1966. It's a comedy about a New York caterer and his wife and daughter being forced to seek asylum in a U.S. Embassy in eastern Europe at the height of the Cold War.A feature film version of the play was made in 1967 with Jackie Gleason, but Allen played no part in that production.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 19, 1992
It's like something out of a Woody Allen movie -- one of the later ones: somber, depressing, full of questions about ethical behavior and full of awe at the capacity of intelligent people to completely screw up their lives. And not a joke in sight.And that's why the revelations and accusations contained in the case of Woody Allen, Mia Farrow and her adopted Korean daughter are so saddening. It's not that reality is imitating art, it's that reality just stinks.In the abstract, of course, it's just another sordid show biz scandal, a business as usual kind of thing involving the messy breakup of a celebrity relationship, charges of despicable sexual behavior with a whiff of hypocrisy that makes it particularly juicy.
NEWS
May 25, 2012
The greatest commencement address ever is now more than three decades old. And it's safe to say it will never be surpassed or even equaled. It belongs to the ages. In 1979, its author summed up the condition of modern man by noting that, quote, more than at any other time in history, humanity is at the crossroads: One path leads to despair and utter hopelessness; the other, to total extinction. Let us pray we have the wisdom to choose correctly. Unquote. Bang. That's all she wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
John Cusack didn't come to Baltimore when preparing to play Edgar Allan Poe in "The Raven. " In fact, he says he's never been here. But when asked whether this city, Boston, Philadelphia, New York or Richmond has dibs on the author's reputation, Cusack, 45, answers without hesitation. "Baltimore!," he said. "Is that even a question?" For Cusack, the only other city that comes close to having a hold on Poe is Boston. After all, he was born there. "But I think people generally would have to concede that Poe is a Baltimore guy," he said.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | June 13, 2011
As a European filmmaker, Woody Allen has worked in England, Spain and now France, where his new movie, "Midnight in Paris," serves as a love letter to that city. Next up on his cinematic map will be Rome. Allen is a long way from the overly familiar sidewalk cafes of New York, which helps explain why his career has experienced some much-needed rejuvenation. Although his characters and thematic obsessions haven't changed all that much, the change in photogenic backdrop has been a decided plus.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2009
THURSDAY HIPPIEFEST: Peace, love and good music, man. Flash back to the '60s with musicians from bands such as the Turtles, Badfinger, Three Dog Night and the Rascals. It'll be like Woodstock all over again (sort of) at Pier Six Pavilion, 731 Eastern Ave. The gates open at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $25-$55. Go to piersixpavilion.com FLICKS FROM THE HILL: Woody Allen's classic 1973 comedy Sleeper screens at this week's Flicks From the Hill at 9 p.m. at American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
Whatever Works makes more of a demand on a viewer's willingness to suspend disbelief than movies about vampires or giant robots. Would a dewy-fresh Southern gal named Melodie St. Anne Celestine marry a New York City curmudgeon named Boris Yellnikoff - especially when he's played by Larry David in an amateurish bluster sure to curb anyone's enthusiasm? It's easier to believe that the lovely and talented actor who plays Melodie, Evan Rachel Wood, in real life has coupled with Marilyn Manson, the shock rocker.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 27, 2009
Starring Javier Bardem, Scarlett Johansson, Penelope Cruz. Written and directed by Woody Allen. Released by the Weinstein Co. $28.95 (Blu-ray $34.95) *** 1/2 Who would have thought Woody Allen would find a new muse in Spain? With Vicky Cristina Barcelona, Allen, that most American of filmmakers, the man who never seemed comfortable setting foot outside New York City, has made his friskiest, most delightful movie in more than a decade. Not that any new territory is trod. Allen still is a chronicler of relationships that result in little genuine happiness; the human heart, he continues to insist, is the most vexing, inexplicable, insatiable of creatures, one humans trust (or even listen to)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 18, 1992
"Husbands and Wives" is Woody Allen's view of marriage -- through a glass of Alka-Seltzer, darkly.The movie is like a radiation trace of a disintegrating relationship; the wash of fiction is that thin and the slather of hostility that thick. Yet this is probably Allen's best movie since "Hannah and Her Sisters," a mature and sobering piece of work that is not only superb in its evocations, quite funny but also troublingly honest about its own biases.Allen really doesn't like women very much.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 6, 1994
New York -- Quick, get this man a transfusion of chicken soup!For the Woody Allen who bobs into a New York hotel room to discuss his new film, "Bullets Over Broadway," it seems as though one of those bullets has sailed over from Broadway and lodged in his heart. Is he in shock? Will soup do, or does he require oxygen or mouth-to-mouth? Wan and pale, he wears the frightened look of a man being wheeled into Shock Trauma. No loud noises please, nothing to drive him to cover. He seems -- why is this so sad?
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | December 12, 2008
Vicky Cristina Barcelona **** ( 4 STARS) The first time this space highlighted this movie - Woody Allen's best in a decade - it hung in for several more weeks at its original location and then began hopping around town. It returns to the Landmark's Harbor East today for the repeat pleasure of fans and the ecstasy of novices who haven't yet savored the most pleasingly mellow and original romantic comedy of the year. It stars Javier Bardem as an artist and Penelope Cruz as the ex-wife who create an enriching sort of chaos in the lives of two young Americans, Scarlett Johansson and Rebecca Hall.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 15, 2008
It used to be said that Woody Allen's best movies were about "sex in the head," as if his characters simply had to relax and let it travel through their bodies. In Allen's affectionate, enlightening and, best of all, blissfully entertaining Vicky Cristina Barcelona, he shows how much residue sexual desire or experience leaves in the brain and gut and heart. It's a summery idyll: his most entertaining picture since Bullets Over Broadway (1994) or maybe Sweet and Lowdown (1999). Scarlett Johansson plays Cristina, an artist looking for an art; Rebecca Hall plays Vicky, a grad student studying Catalan culture; and Javier Bardem plays Juan Antonio, a painter with romantic and critical reputations.
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