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July 21, 2011
Woodstock triathlete Steve Levickas has been keeping busy since competing in the Ironman World Championship in October 2010. Unfortunately, he spent part of this time recovering from injuries - first a broken finger in November and then a frayed labrum in his shoulder. The latter injury required several months to heal properly and the nasty winter weather provided yet another setback. Steve relished his return to outdoor cycling in April. In May, Steve competed in the Columbia Triathlon, held at Centennial Lake.
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NEWS
By Louise Vest | December 11, 2013
50 Years Ago Let's park and have lunch "Helicopter Parks in Don's Backyard  "Don Flax, of Wilflax Motors on Route 40, was startled Thursday to see a helicopter hovering overhead, circle around and land in his parking lot. "Ideas of an emergency, invasion, or an early visit from Santa clause were dispelled when several men descended, identified themselves as a survey team and asked, 'May we leave our helicopter here while we go to...
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 20, 1994
I was 17 in 1969, but didn't make it to the original Woodstock for a number of reasons, the main one being that I was a jerk who spent that weekend working in a pharmacy in upstate New York."
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2013
After a traditional Christian service Sunday, the Rev. Terrence Alspaugh stepped outside his historic stone church and faced a collection of motorcycles. The congregation of this little church by the Baltimore County woods formed a circle. They bowed their heads. "May your bike be free from mechanical failure," Alspaugh prayed. Wait. What? Alspaugh, pastor at Granite Presbyterian Church in Woodstock, was holding a service he calls the Biker Blessings & Bread Sunday, an effort to minister to motorcyclists nearby and throughout the state.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | August 10, 1999
SAG HARBOR, N.Y. -- We are between Woodstock revivals at the moment. There was one at the end of July in Rome, N.Y., and there will be one in Bethel, N.Y., on Sunday -- the site and date of the original in 1969.So far the reviews are not good. The fire, looting and rape that ended the first 1999 revival do not seem to match up well with the old legend."This was the nicest bunch of kids I've ever dealt with," said the local sheriff, a guy named Louis Ratner, back in August 1969. This time the sheriff is using the Internet to try and track down kids who wreaked havoc in Rome.
EXPLORE
By Kevin Leonard | December 29, 2012
The second half of the 1960s ushered in the era of music festivals - culminating with the granddaddy of them all, Woodstock, in August 1969. Other festivals that enjoyed huge attendance that year included pop festivals in Atlanta and Texas, 140,000 attendees each; the notorious Altamont Speedway Festival, 120,000; and the Newport Jazz Festival, 78,000. Lost in the smoky haze of 1960s history is The Laurel Pop Festival held in July 1969, which was attended by 15,000 fans and offered an incredible lineup of some of the biggest pop performers of the year.
NEWS
August 17, 1994
First, the suicide of rock star Kurt Cobain, now Woodstock II. How many more cultural touchstones have to be offered up to convince baby boomers that they're out of it -- or will be very soon.Many pundits observed this incarnation of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair in upstate New York as nothing like the original: The Woodstock of 1969 was the love child of spontaneity in a crucible of war protest; Woodstock '94 was the test-tube fetus of corporate sponsorship in an era of boundless commercialism.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1994
These days, it's almost a mantra for me to complain that the best stuff is on cable TV. I won't say that tonight, though. Tonight the best stuff is on pay-per-view -- unless you're sick to death of the whole Woodstock '94 thing, in which case the best thing to do with TV tonight is to do without it.* "Tales From the Crypt" (11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- The second of these two repeats, featuring Faye Grant as a housewife who is unnaturally inspired by her daytime soaps, is a very funny episode of "Crypt" -- Alan Rachins of "L. A. Law" offers fine support.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1994
Doug Sergeant was a young, three-piece-suit banker 25 years ago when hundreds of thousands of America's young counterculture went looking for free love, peace and a good time at Woodstock.But standing on a Catonsville park-and-ride lot yesterday with an assortment of young and old, the gray-haired, 52-year-old conservative-turned-hippie was on his way to this weekend's Woodstock '94, the festival marking the silver anniversary of the monumental rock concert.He and more than 200 others were headed to upstate New York to sell food for the Ellicott City-based Boardwalk Fries, which has been subcontracted as one of a handful of vendors to feed the estimated 170,000 concertgoers.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 10, 1994
Nobody knew what to expect at Woodstock the first time around.When the promoters were putting the original festival together 25 years ago, they figured there would be good music, pleasant weather and a crowd of just more than 60,000 people. Instead, they wound up with a half million people (few of whom actually paid admission), torrential rains, and ancillary problems ranging from road-choking traffic to a chronic shortage of food, medicine and sanitary facilities.This time, they're prepared.
NEWS
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | September 5, 2013
It's namesake event became a cultural icon, even as it was a muddy mess and a business flop. EdgeWoodstock, held last weekend at Edgewood Recreation Park, drew a crowd estimated at 500, which is on par with what was expected. It hardly compares to the overflow crowd estimates for the 1969 Aquarian Exposition in upstate New York near a town whose name has become a synonym for the idealism and hypocrisy of the counterculture movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s: Woodstock. It's a word that can have powerful connotations as both insult and ideal.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
For 23 years, the Howard County Conservancy has been a staple in the county's western landscape, a sprawling, 232-acre farm in Woodstock that, on any given day, is teeming with schoolchildren or outdoor enthusiasts. Yet the eastern portion of Howard — namely the towns of Elkridge and Jessup — have sometimes seemed like a distant world for conservancy officials to attract. That might be about to change, though, as the nonprofit conservancy will have an opportunity to extend its reach to the east.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Editor's note: This is the first in a series of occasional features on prominent local residents and the possessions they treasure. You can get a pretty good idea of someone's journey through life by looking at the objects with which he surrounds himself. For Gary Vikan, who stepped down this spring as the director of the Walters Art Museum , those objects include a pair of tickets to Woodstock, a piece of the gate guarding Graceland, a collection of Russian icons and a miniature replica of the Shroud of Turin.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | February 1, 2013
  Weis Markets will unveil a remodeled store in Woodstock on Sunday. The store in the Waverly Woods development in Howard County has remained open during the course of the $3 million project. It will have larger produce and service seafood departments, an expanded deli, larger frozen and dairy sections, a bigger pharmacy and more self-scan lanes. Weis is also finishing work on two new stores that will open in Woodlawn and Towson. The grocery chain has 163 stores in Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and West Virginia.
EXPLORE
By Kevin Leonard | December 29, 2012
The second half of the 1960s ushered in the era of music festivals - culminating with the granddaddy of them all, Woodstock, in August 1969. Other festivals that enjoyed huge attendance that year included pop festivals in Atlanta and Texas, 140,000 attendees each; the notorious Altamont Speedway Festival, 120,000; and the Newport Jazz Festival, 78,000. Lost in the smoky haze of 1960s history is The Laurel Pop Festival held in July 1969, which was attended by 15,000 fans and offered an incredible lineup of some of the biggest pop performers of the year.
EXPLORE
September 7, 2012
For many years, Grandmother Catherine Bellis, a lifelong resident of Catonsville, has been knitting scarves for the men living at the Westside Shelter and needy families in both Baltimore County and Baltimore City. I have been the recipient of her labor of love for the distribution of these items. Many men, women and children have been a little warmer on cold winter days because of her kind heart and desire to help those in need. Unfortunately, at 101 years young, her eyes are no longer able to keep up with her desire to help.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 13, 1994
Saugerties, N.Y. -- After a half-million people descended on Max Yasgur's farm for the first Woodstock in 1969, someone boasted from the stage that the festival was the third biggest city in New York state.Woodstock '94 isn't quite as populous as that (although no precise count was available, ticket sales were said to have passed the 200,000 mark by Friday evening), but it is more like a real city than its predecessor was. It has its own roads, housing, plumbing and it has its own police.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | August 8, 1994
They are stardust, they are golden, they are prices for a good night's sleep in the Woodstock area during the coming festival weekend.Homeowners, like nearby hotels, are hoping to cash in on the one thing the open-air festival can't provide the 150,000 concertgoers: a roof over their heads at night. Spare bedrooms or entire houses, quarters ranging from the plain to the palatial, locations just down the road from the Saugerties, N.Y., festival site or farther from the madding crowds-- they're all for rent, at a price.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
A CSX Corp. train collided with a vehicle Wednesday in Rosedale, injuring the car's driver, shortly before the car on another CSX train derailed in Woodstock, according to CSX and fire officials. The incidents were not related but occurred within minutes of each other and closed roads in Baltimore and Howard counties, officials said. About 12:30 p.m., an intermodal CSX train collided with a vehicle at the railway's intersection with Schaefer's Lane near Pulaski Highway, according to Bob Sullivan, a CSX spokesman.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
Frisky's Wildlife and Primate Sanctuary, in Woodstock, relies on the kindness of strangers. Strangers bring injured and abandoned animals to the 4-acre site, where they are sheltered and nursed to health. And strangers volunteer at the nonprofit organization, which has no paid staff. Heather Wandell has been volunteering at Frisky's since her son, now 22, spent a summer volunteering there before his sophomore year at Mt. Hebron High School. He moved on to other interests, but Wandell was hooked.
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