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Woodlawn Vase

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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Gunfire. Skullduggery. Bones in the attic. The story behind the story of the Preakness trophy reads like a great Southern novel. The Woodlawn Vase has its roots in pre-Civil War Kentucky. It was even buried there to keep it from falling into the wrong hands by a horse breeder who once got into a gunfight with the owner of a racetrack, shot the man and was banished from all tracks in America — you could look it up in The New York Times of 1879. The breeder, Capt. Thomas Moore, whose horses won the Tiffany-crafted, sterling silver trophy in 1861 and 1862, interred it for fear it would be melted down for shot, the popular story goes.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Charles C. "Chas" Stieff II, former executive vice president of the Kirk-Stieff Co. who had been active in civic affairs, died May 17 of heart failure at the Broadmead retirement community. He was 92. Charles Clinton Stieff II was born in Baltimore, the son of Gideon Numsen Stieff and Claire von Marees Stieff. In 1892, his grandfather, Charles C. Stieff, established the silversmith Stieff Co., which in 1979 merged with Samuel Kirk & Sons to form Kirk-Stieff Co. Mr. Stieff was raised on Ridgewood Road in Roland Park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | May 11, 2003
At first glance, nothing about the Woodlawn Vase -- the shiny silver trophy presented annually to the winner of the Preakness -- seems to embody the thrill of the race. Where in its delicate, ornate features are the galloping, straining horses? Where are the bulging muscles, flaring nostrils and glistening coats? Where are the hysterical crowds? At a glance, the trophy hints at little more than that triumphant Kodak moment in which the victor raises the cup for the crowds to cheer and the cameras to flash.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
This was my fifth consecutive time attending the Preakness Stakes with my husband, sister and brother-in-law. Our seats are located in the Turfside Terrace section of the racetrack. Everything, as usual, was fantastic. All of the employees from security, tellers, waiters and waitresses, bathroom attendants, and I am sure countless others who I failed to mention were great! Special thanks to our Baltimore City police officers. I even got to speak to Maryland Jockey Club President Thomas Chuckas personally that day about a parking issue we had. He listened to my problem very patiently and told me how to resolve it next year when I purchase my tickets.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
This time, the luster of the Preakness Stakes was darkened by what happened shortly after the start, not what happened when the field turned into the stretch run. When Kentucky Derby champion Barbaro broke down before reaching the finish line the first time, the tenor of the race was completely altered, with no overwhelming favorite to look for when the running turned really serious. "With Barbaro in there, I don't know what margin he would have won by if he didn't have the injury," said Bernardini's trainer, Tom Albertrani.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
The Woodlawn Vase Want to feel like a winner? Then check out the Woodlawn Vase, which is presented to the winner of the Preakness Stakes. It is a part of the Baltimore Museum of Art's collection of equestrian art and historic American and British horseracing trophies. The sterling silver Woodlawn Vase, which was created by Tiffany and Company and stands 34 inches tall, will be on display in the museum's gallery dedicated to the William Woodward Collection. The Woodward Collection features 52 paintings of horses and racing scenes.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 3, 1991
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- For the people closely connected with Dinard and Cahill Road, the "what-ifs" of the 117th Kentucky Derby never will be answered.The same goes for Olympio, the Arkansas Derby winner, who was not entered yesterday. But the reason was not injury, as was the case for Dinard and Cahill Road.Trainer Ron McAnally had the luxury of choosing between Olympio and Sea Cadet for owner Verne Winchell. The deciding factor, McAnally said, was that the two-week period between the Arkansas Derby and tomorrow's race was simply not longenough.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
This was my fifth consecutive time attending the Preakness Stakes with my husband, sister and brother-in-law. Our seats are located in the Turfside Terrace section of the racetrack. Everything, as usual, was fantastic. All of the employees from security, tellers, waiters and waitresses, bathroom attendants, and I am sure countless others who I failed to mention were great! Special thanks to our Baltimore City police officers. I even got to speak to Maryland Jockey Club President Thomas Chuckas personally that day about a parking issue we had. He listened to my problem very patiently and told me how to resolve it next year when I purchase my tickets.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Charles C. "Chas" Stieff II, former executive vice president of the Kirk-Stieff Co. who had been active in civic affairs, died May 17 of heart failure at the Broadmead retirement community. He was 92. Charles Clinton Stieff II was born in Baltimore, the son of Gideon Numsen Stieff and Claire von Marees Stieff. In 1892, his grandfather, Charles C. Stieff, established the silversmith Stieff Co., which in 1979 merged with Samuel Kirk & Sons to form Kirk-Stieff Co. Mr. Stieff was raised on Ridgewood Road in Roland Park.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
No one gets to take the Woodlawn Vase home anymore. Jeanne Murray Vanderbilt made sure of that in 1953 after her husband's horse, Native Dancer, won the Preakness by a neck. She was not going to be responsible for the three-foot-tall, 30 pound solid sterling silver trophy the winning owner was entitled to keep until the next year's race. So she gave it back. The next year — and for the 56 years since — owners have been getting a one-third replica of the original, which sits gleaming in a case at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The perpetual trophy, appraised at more than $1 million, will have its coming out party on Saturday, escorted to its place of honor in the winner's circle by white-gloved members of Maryland's National Guard.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
No one gets to take the Woodlawn Vase home anymore. Jeanne Murray Vanderbilt made sure of that in 1953 after her husband's horse, Native Dancer, won the Preakness by a neck. She was not going to be responsible for the three-foot-tall, 30 pound solid sterling silver trophy the winning owner was entitled to keep until the next year's race. So she gave it back. The next year — and for the 56 years since — owners have been getting a one-third replica of the original, which sits gleaming in a case at the Baltimore Museum of Art . The perpetual trophy, appraised at more than $1 million, will have its coming out party on Saturday, escorted to its place of honor in the winner's circle by white-gloved members of Maryland's National Guard.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Gunfire. Skullduggery. Bones in the attic. The story behind the story of the Preakness trophy reads like a great Southern novel. The Woodlawn Vase has its roots in pre-Civil War Kentucky. It was even buried there to keep it from falling into the wrong hands by a horse breeder who once got into a gunfight with the owner of a racetrack, shot the man and was banished from all tracks in America — you could look it up in The New York Times of 1879. The breeder, Capt. Thomas Moore, whose horses won the Tiffany-crafted, sterling silver trophy in 1861 and 1862, interred it for fear it would be melted down for shot, the popular story goes.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
This time, the luster of the Preakness Stakes was darkened by what happened shortly after the start, not what happened when the field turned into the stretch run. When Kentucky Derby champion Barbaro broke down before reaching the finish line the first time, the tenor of the race was completely altered, with no overwhelming favorite to look for when the running turned really serious. "With Barbaro in there, I don't know what margin he would have won by if he didn't have the injury," said Bernardini's trainer, Tom Albertrani.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann McArthur | March 17, 2005
The Woodlawn Vase Want to feel like a winner? Then check out the Woodlawn Vase, which is presented to the winner of the Preakness Stakes. It is a part of the Baltimore Museum of Art's collection of equestrian art and historic American and British horseracing trophies. The sterling silver Woodlawn Vase, which was created by Tiffany and Company and stands 34 inches tall, will be on display in the museum's gallery dedicated to the William Woodward Collection. The Woodward Collection features 52 paintings of horses and racing scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | May 11, 2003
At first glance, nothing about the Woodlawn Vase -- the shiny silver trophy presented annually to the winner of the Preakness -- seems to embody the thrill of the race. Where in its delicate, ornate features are the galloping, straining horses? Where are the bulging muscles, flaring nostrils and glistening coats? Where are the hysterical crowds? At a glance, the trophy hints at little more than that triumphant Kodak moment in which the victor raises the cup for the crowds to cheer and the cameras to flash.
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 3, 1991
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- For the people closely connected with Dinard and Cahill Road, the "what-ifs" of the 117th Kentucky Derby never will be answered.The same goes for Olympio, the Arkansas Derby winner, who was not entered yesterday. But the reason was not injury, as was the case for Dinard and Cahill Road.Trainer Ron McAnally had the luxury of choosing between Olympio and Sea Cadet for owner Verne Winchell. The deciding factor, McAnally said, was that the two-week period between the Arkansas Derby and tomorrow's race was simply not longenough.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
When the owner of the winning horse in the 2013 Preakness Stakes mounts the podium to strains of "Maryland, My Maryland" to accept the Woodlawn Vase Saturday,  Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown will make the presentation. Gov. Martin O'Malley's office said Thursday that while the governor will make his customary visit to Pimlico Race Course on Preakness Day, he will duck out early to attend to a family obligation. Brown is an announced candidate for governor in 2014, when O'Malley can't run for re-election because of term limits, and can presumably use the exposure.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
Tomorrow is the biggest day of the year for Maryland horse racing. Fourteen 3-year-old thoroughbreds, racing a mile and 3/16th, in front of 90,000-plus spectators and a television audience of tens of millions. A total purse of $744,800 ($484,000 BTC of it for the winner). In search of the famed Woodlawn Vase, emblematic of victory in the 117th running of the Preakness Stakes, the midway point in racing's Triple Crown.Forget about the feuding owners of Pimlico Race Course. Forget about yesterday's superhorse, Arazi, who flopped so badly at the Kentucky Derby the horse is back in Paris instead of in Baltimore.
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