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NEWS
August 6, 1992
Woodward & Lothrop Inc. was never known for environmental activism. Yet it is suing everyone in sight in Anne Arundel County on the grounds the planned expansion of the Annapolis Mall will spoil wetlands, endanger water supplies and increase pollution and traffic. Woodies maintains that's its sole concern. No one believes it.This activism was triggered by a mall expansion to accommodate Nordstrom's, a move that may affect a nearby Woodies. It has appealed rejection of an earlier challenge to the expansion and also filed lawsuits in federal and state courts alleging that the county worked with the mall to circumvent environmental requirements and that state officials allowed illegal dumping.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Actor Woody Harrelson, who recently joined with local financier John "Jack" Dwyer to purchase the Inn at the Black Olive, will be in town July 27 to co-host a charity dinner at the Fells Point hotel and restaurant. Harrelson, an Emmy winner and Oscar nominee, will host the dinner, along with Dwyer, chairman of the family of Capital Funding companies in Baltimore, and Dimitris Spiliadis, whose family opened the hotel and restaurant in 2011. They lost it to foreclosure last summer, but Spiliadis remains as manager of the Black Olive, which bills itself as "Baltimore's most organic hotel and restaurant.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1995
The names Woodward and Lothrop have graced dry goods emporiums for more than 100 years. Whether they will continue to do so is uncertain.Woodward & Lothrop Holdings is on the bidding block. As a result of its continuing bankruptcy process, the Alexandria, Va.-based department store chain is considering buyout proposals or other offers from outside investors.Chairman and CEO Robert B. Mang said last week that Woodies has received "viable interest" from four potential partners. Some are other retailers, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2014
With only a few rum bars available to choose from in this town, there are even fewer still that provide one of the more iconic selections known to man: the Painkiller. Woody's Rum Bar and Island Grill, we thank you. Thought to be an invention of the British Virgin Islands in the 1970s, a traditional Painkiller consists of one, two or more-dangerous three parts - denoted by No. 1, 2 and 3 - of Pusser's dark rum, coconut cream (ooh), orange juice (aaah) and pineapple juice (what?
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
Woodward & Lothrop, Annapolis' first large department store, was to have been the bridge between the old and the new Parole Plaza, the only store that would remain during the redevelopment of the 33-year-old strip center.But the buyout of Woodies in a New York bankruptcy court last week has left the fate of the store and shopping center up in the air.Federated Department Stores, which owns Macy's, offered to take over the Parole Plaza building as part of its bid to buy the Alexandria-based Woodies and its Philadelphia subsidiary, John Wanamaker department stores.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1995
Woodward & Lothrop Inc. finalized an agreement yesterday to sell most of its assets, including department stores in White Marsh, Annapolis and Columbia, to a group led by Federated Department Stores.Cincinnati-based Federated will acquire 10 of Woodies' 15 department stores, one of its four furniture stores in Bethesda and the lease on Woodies' 285,000-square-foot distribution center in Baltimore, which employs about 320. Also part of the purchase is the John Wanamaker flagship department store in downtown Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 20, 1992
Woodward & Lothrop Inc., embroiled in a public squabble over Annapolis Mall's proposed expansion to open a Nordstrom department store, fired another shot yesterday in its battle to block the plans.Woodies, which says it's fighting a new 260,000-square-foot Nordstrom and some 45 smaller stores for environmental and technical reasons, appealed the mall's grading permit, temporarily delaying work.The mall, a mile from Woodies' Parole store, had expected to start grading within two weeks, said Rodney Haynes, vice president of development for the mall's manager.
NEWS
February 18, 1993
So now the truth comes out. After months of masquerading as environmentalists out to save Parole from the expansion of the Annapolis Mall, Woodward & Lothrop Inc. has finally 'fessed up to what many people thought all along: Woodies' driving concern was not the environment.Ever since it was displaced by Nordstrom from a choice slot in the mall, the Washington-based retail chain has been suing nearly everyone in sight. It has tried to block the expansion on the grounds that it would spoil wetlands, endanger creeks and increase pollution and traffic.
NEWS
August 24, 1995
Some stores become so familiar and so much a part of the community that losing them feels like losing an old friend. The Woodward & Lothrop store in Parole Plaza is like that. It was Annapolis' first nice department store, arriving in the mid-1960s when the state capital was still a little town and residents had to travel to Washington or Baltimore for serious shopping. How many Anne Arundel countians remember their parents taking them to Woodies to buy school clothes? Or picking out wedding gifts there for close friends and family?
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
Woodward & Lothrop Inc. has agreed to move its distribution center supporting 35 department stores to the Zamoiski Co. warehouse in South Baltimore, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday.The deal is expected to mark a $10 million investment in the city and create at least 200 jobs.The center will consolidate facilities now located in Washington, Belmar, N.J., and at least one other location. The department store chain will lease 295,000 square feet of warehouse space for five years beginning this fall, with an option to renew for another five years.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Actor Woody Harrelson, known for his characters in the TV show "Cheers" and movies such as "No Country for Old Men" and "The Hunger Games," has a new role: landlord of Fells Point's Inn at the Black Olive. The celebrity joined John "Jack" Dwyer, chairman of the family of Capital Funding companies in Baltimore, in a 50-50 venture to purchase the property for $4.5 million in January after being connected by Dimitris Spiliadis, whose family opened the 12-room hotel in 2011 and lost it to foreclosure last summer.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Gardeners attack the spring with energy and enthusiasm, adding lots of color, bulbs, perennials, flowering trees and shrubs. We wilt in the summer heat, and by fall we barely have the spirit for a pot of mums. Winter, we think, is for catalogs by the fire. It's also when you stop working in the garden and just think about it. Not so for Christine Killian of Annapolis and Alice Ryan of Easton. Both gardeners have made it a point to create winter interest in their gardens, if for no other reason than they want something lovely to look at from the warmth of the house.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Yes, that really was actor Woody Harrelson tooling around Baltimore on a bike Friday afternoon. Master illusionist David Blaine was in tow, according to Joe Traill, the owner of Joe's Bike Shop in Fells Point. Traill said that Harrelson has been a customer of his ever since he came in Baltimore in 2011 to film "Game Change. " "I think a bike is his preferred mode of transport around the city," Traill said. But, he said, this was the first time Blaine had ever been inside the shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
You might think of Michael Lisicky's obsession with department stores as an orchestral tone poem for a single oboe: at turns plaintive and raucous, eloquent and funny, with unpredictable little swerves. Lisicky is second oboist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and also plays the English horn. Two of his main obsessions - and he has many - are music and his dedication to tracing the history of the elegant emporiums of the past. His love for these grand old stores has become a kind of shorthand for his love of his fun and gregarious late mother, Anne.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| June 12, 2013
The sandwich's simple format offers unlimited options for culinary creativity. At Woody's Hitching Post - deep in Monkton's pastoral horse country - chef-owner David "Woody" Woodruff is busy exploring those options - to the great benefit of his customers. Woodruff opened his eponymous shop last summer, leaving behind a career in commercial real estate (he had restaurant experience from his younger days). It's a simple spot - bare-bones decor, handwritten signs advertising the menu, a handful of tables and an open, diner-style kitchen - but that keeps the focus on the food and on Woodruff's friendly personality.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
M&T Bank Corp. executive Atwood "Woody" Collins III has succeeded Edwin F. Hale Sr. as chair of the Baltimore Convention and Tourism Board, city officials said Monday. The appointment of Collins, an executive vice president of M&T, became effective Friday, Visit Baltimore announced. Collins has served on the convention and tourism board since 2008 as treasurer and head of the finance committee, advising on budget management and fiscal matters for both Visit Baltimore, the city's tourism and convention bureau, and the Baltimore Convention Center.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1995
The bidding war is on.Less than 24 hours after May Department Stores Co. and J. C. Penney Co. unloaded a joint offer to acquire Alexandria, Va.-based Woodward & Lothrop Inc., analysts and officials involved in the deal speculated that competitor Federated Department Stores would be forced to up the ante.Federated -- mum for the moment -- has 10 days to decide.At stake is a cache of Woodies department stores in the Baltimore-Washington market and, through the chain's subsidiary, John Wanamaker stores in the Philadelphia region -- both strategic and lucrative markets in an increasingly consolidating and competitive department store industry.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | July 1, 1992
Parole's growth-control plan, adopted nearly two years ago, will discourage retail development in Parole Plaza, home of Woodward & Lothrop Inc., and direct it toward Annapolis Mall, a Woodies official said yesterday.Robert Mulligan, Woodies' vice chairman, called for a new public hearing on the mall's plans to add a Nordstrom department store and 45 smaller stores. He charged that the expansion will lead to traffic congestion, polluted air, land erosion and wetland degradation."This Parole plan, along with the proposed Annapolis Mall expansion, will have dramatic short- and long-term effects on the area's future," Mulligan said.
SPORTS
By Woody Paige and The Denver Post | January 12, 2013
The cold, hard fact is the Broncos lost everything Saturday. And they blew it. They lost the overtime coin toss. They lost a cinch victory with 31 seconds left in the fourth quarter by blowing coverage. They lost the game on an intercepted pass late in the fifth quarter. They lost the playoff game early in the sixth quarter on a 47-yard field goal. They lost their chance at a ninth AFC championship game. They lost the opportunity for the franchise to win a third Super Bowl.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Wilbur D. "Woody" Preston Jr., a retired partner in the Baltimore law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston who was Maryland's special counsel during the 1985 savings and loan crisis, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. He was 90. Mr. Preston's yearlong investigation into the causes of the savings and loan crisis that swept Maryland in the mid-1980s resulted in the publication of the highly acclaimed Preston Report, which was a thorough and detailed analysis of the debacle.
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