Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWood Gundy
IN THE NEWS

Wood Gundy

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
A British investment bank is seeking court permission to begin seizing assets of William P. Trainor, one of the alleged masterminds behind bankrupt Columbia-based Novatek International Inc., as well as the assets of six of his family members.In papers filed yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, London-based Wood Gundy London Ltd. is seeking a summary judgment in an $8 million lawsuit it has rekindled against the Trainor family. If granted, the order would allow Wood Gundy and other creditors to seize assets of the Trainors and companies connected to them without a trial.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
A federal judge in Baltimore yesterday gave creditors seeking the return of millions they claim were illegally siphoned out of a Columbia company the right to seize assets of a Florida businessmen and his family if they don't make timely payments under a settlement.Under the order signed by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James T. Schneider, British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors could seize assets, such as cars, homes and bank accounts, of William P. Trainor and family members.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1997
A federal bankruptcy court judge yesterday paved the way for Wood Gundy London Ltd., of London, to pursue its multimillion-dollar fraud lawsuit against two principal insiders behind Novatek International, the bankrupt Columbia-based company under federal investigation for stock fraud.Wood Gundy and other creditors in the lawsuit are seeking the return of $8 million paid out by Novatek.Judge James F. Schneider set deadlines for lawyers to complete the gathering of evidence and filing motions in the case.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
A British investment bank is seeking court permission to begin seizing assets of William P. Trainor, one of the alleged masterminds behind bankrupt Columbia-based Novatek International Inc., as well as the assets of six of his family members.In papers filed yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, London-based Wood Gundy London Ltd. is seeking a summary judgment in an $8 million lawsuit it has rekindled against the Trainor family. If granted, the order would allow Wood Gundy and other creditors to seize assets of the Trainors and companies connected to them without a trial.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors are moving to seize assets of William P. Trainor and one of his companies after he failed to pay more than $2 million of a settlement reached in a fraud suit in connection with Novatek International Inc. of Columbia.Wood Gundy and the creditors filed notice Sept. 30 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that they are rekindling their $8 million lawsuit against Trainor and his business partner Vincent D. Celentano."We gave Trainor a chance to put all this behind him, but he missed that opportunity," said Edward Meehan, an attorney with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in Washington, which is representing Wood Gundy and an unsecured creditors group.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
A fraud and conspiracy complaint has been dismissed against a Columbia medical technology company with ties to Novatek International Inc., the bankrupt Columbia firm under Securities and Exchange Commission investigation for stock fraud.The Feb. 4 ruling by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James T. Schneider dismissed the civil complaint against Universal Health Watch Inc. and two former Novatek officers now living in Florida, Rudolphe Baboun Sr., once a director, and Larry Schone, a one-time secretary.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1999
A federal judge in Baltimore yesterday gave creditors seeking the return of millions they claim were illegally siphoned out of a Columbia company the right to seize assets of a Florida businessmen and his family if they don't make timely payments under a settlement.Under the order signed by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James T. Schneider, British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors could seize assets, such as cars, homes and bank accounts, of William P. Trainor and family members.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
One of Britain's leading investment houses and a group of other creditors are seeking millions of dollars from two Florida businessmen and others connected to Novatek International, the bankrupt Columbia company under federal investigation, claiming they defrauded the institution of $4 million and bilked "millions of dollars from investors" in a stock-rigging scheme.The complaint, filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, is the first time that two of the principal insiders behind Novatek, William P. Trainor and Vincent D. Celentano, have been accused masterminding the scheme.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
Two Florida men accused of defrauding a British investment bank of more than $4 million as part of an alleged stock-rigging scheme involving a Maryland company have agreed to settle a lawsuit against them for $2.8 million, U.S. Bankruptcy Court records show.William P. Trainor and Vincent D. Celentano, two wealthy Hillsboro Beach, Fla., residents, and companies or family trusts connected to them have until July 31 to pay the $2.8 million. Otherwise, the case against them and others will continue, court records show.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 24, 1995
NORWALK, Conn. -- At least three factors stopped approving shipments to Caldor Corp., said a person familiar with the situation, meaning the retailer might not be able to keep its shelves fully stocked.The news comes as Caldor, which has struggled amid fierce competition, said it is experiencing "sluggish sales." The company has 12 stores in Maryland.Analysts said they expect same-store sales to decline by about 8 percent in August on slow back-to-school sales. That would be the sixth straight month of declining sales at Caldor stores open at least a year.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors are moving to seize assets of William P. Trainor and one of his companies after he failed to pay more than $2 million of a settlement reached in a fraud suit in connection with Novatek International Inc. of Columbia.Wood Gundy and the creditors filed notice Sept. 30 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that they are rekindling their $8 million lawsuit against Trainor and his business partner Vincent D. Celentano."We gave Trainor a chance to put all this behind him, but he missed that opportunity," said Edward Meehan, an attorney with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in Washington, which is representing Wood Gundy and an unsecured creditors group.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
Two Florida men accused of defrauding a British investment bank of more than $4 million as part of an alleged stock-rigging scheme involving a Maryland company have agreed to settle a lawsuit against them for $2.8 million, U.S. Bankruptcy Court records show.William P. Trainor and Vincent D. Celentano, two wealthy Hillsboro Beach, Fla., residents, and companies or family trusts connected to them have until July 31 to pay the $2.8 million. Otherwise, the case against them and others will continue, court records show.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
A fraud and conspiracy complaint has been dismissed against a Columbia medical technology company with ties to Novatek International Inc., the bankrupt Columbia firm under Securities and Exchange Commission investigation for stock fraud.The Feb. 4 ruling by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James T. Schneider dismissed the civil complaint against Universal Health Watch Inc. and two former Novatek officers now living in Florida, Rudolphe Baboun Sr., once a director, and Larry Schone, a one-time secretary.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1997
A federal bankruptcy court judge yesterday paved the way for Wood Gundy London Ltd., of London, to pursue its multimillion-dollar fraud lawsuit against two principal insiders behind Novatek International, the bankrupt Columbia-based company under federal investigation for stock fraud.Wood Gundy and other creditors in the lawsuit are seeking the return of $8 million paid out by Novatek.Judge James F. Schneider set deadlines for lawyers to complete the gathering of evidence and filing motions in the case.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
One of Britain's leading investment houses and a group of other creditors are seeking millions of dollars from two Florida businessmen and others connected to Novatek International, the bankrupt Columbia company under federal investigation, claiming they defrauded the institution of $4 million and bilked "millions of dollars from investors" in a stock-rigging scheme.The complaint, filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, is the first time that two of the principal insiders behind Novatek, William P. Trainor and Vincent D. Celentano, have been accused masterminding the scheme.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
A lawyer for British investment house Wood Gundy London Ltd. and other creditors in the Novatek International Inc. bankruptcy case said yesterday that the group plans to begin seizing assets of Florida businessman William P. Trainor and his family as a result of their failure to make a $300,000 settlement payment. "We plan to push forward to enforce these judgments, find assets and strip them of everything we can find," said Edward J. Meehan, of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP in Washington, which is representing creditors who sued the Trainors.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
A creditors' group is seeking to block a Securities and Exchange Commission request that it be given until late July to file a claim in the bankruptcy case of Medical Diagnostic Products Inc., the Columbia-based company formerly known as Novatek International Inc. that is under investigation for stock fraud.The agency, which halted trading in Novatek stock last fall, told the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore that it needed more time to determine if it had a claim and, if so, how much to seek.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.