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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 19, 2007
Birds from the Yucatan aren't supposed to be in southwestern Wisconsin. But that's one of the wonderful things about birds. They fly, and sometimes they act in a bizarre and unexpected way." - DONNIE DANN, a bird conservation expert from Highland Park, Ill., on the discovery of a green-breasted mango - a South American hummingbird rarely seen north of the Mexican border - in the backyard of a home in Beloit, Wis.
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NEWS
May 21, 2012
How sad that Del. Patrick McDonough chooses to use his bully pulpit to frighten tourists away from Baltimore City ("Baltimore and bigotry," May 18) - and how said that the media lets him get away with it by using race-baiting headlines. Yes, a lot of teenagers came down to the harbor just like a hundreds of other people to enjoy the weather, and yes, the police need to be more prepared to handle the few troublemakers who show up. But those of us who live here and enjoy all of the wonderful things the city has to offer would appreciate it if those who want to destroy Baltimore would keep their negativity to themselves.
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NEWS
May 21, 2012
How sad that Del. Patrick McDonough chooses to use his bully pulpit to frighten tourists away from Baltimore City ("Baltimore and bigotry," May 18) - and how said that the media lets him get away with it by using race-baiting headlines. Yes, a lot of teenagers came down to the harbor just like a hundreds of other people to enjoy the weather, and yes, the police need to be more prepared to handle the few troublemakers who show up. But those of us who live here and enjoy all of the wonderful things the city has to offer would appreciate it if those who want to destroy Baltimore would keep their negativity to themselves.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 19, 2007
Birds from the Yucatan aren't supposed to be in southwestern Wisconsin. But that's one of the wonderful things about birds. They fly, and sometimes they act in a bizarre and unexpected way." - DONNIE DANN, a bird conservation expert from Highland Park, Ill., on the discovery of a green-breasted mango - a South American hummingbird rarely seen north of the Mexican border - in the backyard of a home in Beloit, Wis.
NEWS
May 15, 1999
ALL good things must end, even "Homicide: Life on the Street." The television drama set here has been canceled for next season by NBC. That's a business, not artistic, decision and an inevitable one. The 122nd episode, Friday, is to be the last ever.Seven seasons is not bad for a series that won with critical acclaim. Along the way, it did wonderful things. The hand-held camera brought a gritty realism.This was notable fiction based on a depressing nonfiction book, "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," by then-Sun reporter David Simon.
NEWS
May 15, 1991
It is gratifying that Queen Elizabeth II has maintained her interest in the Maryland sports scene through a long and glorious reign. The last time she took in a game, 43,000 fans cheered wildly as she and Prince Philip, in President Eisenhower's plastic-topped limo, circled the field at Byrd Stadium in College Park before watching the Maryland-North Carolina football showdown. It was Oct. 19, 1957.The queen took her seat between Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin of the host state and Gov. Luther Hodges of the visitors.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Andrew D. Green and Laura Vozzella and Andrew D. Green,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
The Maryland General Assembly's incoming freshmen lawmakers wrapped up a three-day tour of the state yesterday, professing a new appreciation for the needs of poor city residents, suburban commuters, public universities and tourism programs - and scratching their heads about how to support them all given the budget crisis. "You're at College Park and you see the wonderful things going on, and you come to Coppin State and you see the wonderful things going on ... ," said Del.-elect Steven J. DeBoy Sr. of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | August 28, 2005
The past is taking over the present. Reflect for a moment on what's "new." The Dukes of Hazzard. VW Beetles. Chuck Taylors.www Then consider that "Dust in the Wind" by the '70s rock group Kansas is background music for a new car commercial. It's just the latest in a long line of recent rock 'n' roll sell-outs, but you have to admit it's kind of nice to hear it again. This year Hasbro Inc. introduced updated versions of classic board games like Twister and Candy Land, and sales skyrocketed.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | February 7, 2007
The clangs of cookie sheets and closing ovens were drowned out by the high-pitched banter of late-night sleepovers: teenage romances, school rivalries. At Calvary United Methodist Church on Saturday, several dozen teenagers had gathered early on a cold morning to raise money for service projects they will take on this summer. The fundraising plan was typical: They were going to sell cookies. What was not typical was that they baked them, too. In a four-hour stretch, the volunteers baked 15,600 cookies, or 1,300 dozen, packaged in a plastic bag with a personalized message.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | November 20, 2004
A FRIEND tells me to always believe what you overhear from other passengers on a bus; this week I heeded that advice. A few weeks ago a bunch of Peabody Institute students climbed aboard a coach at 27th and St. Paul streets. They were carrying bound copies of the score of Cendrillon, Jules Massenet's version of Cinderella. The students were full of life and so intently happy to be performing. I eavesdropped on every word, of course, and discovered I was seated across from Dorothee, one of the overbearing stepsisters.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | February 7, 2007
The clangs of cookie sheets and closing ovens were drowned out by the high-pitched banter of late-night sleepovers: teenage romances, school rivalries. At Calvary United Methodist Church on Saturday, several dozen teenagers had gathered early on a cold morning to raise money for service projects they will take on this summer. The fundraising plan was typical: They were going to sell cookies. What was not typical was that they baked them, too. In a four-hour stretch, the volunteers baked 15,600 cookies, or 1,300 dozen, packaged in a plastic bag with a personalized message.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | August 28, 2005
The past is taking over the present. Reflect for a moment on what's "new." The Dukes of Hazzard. VW Beetles. Chuck Taylors.www Then consider that "Dust in the Wind" by the '70s rock group Kansas is background music for a new car commercial. It's just the latest in a long line of recent rock 'n' roll sell-outs, but you have to admit it's kind of nice to hear it again. This year Hasbro Inc. introduced updated versions of classic board games like Twister and Candy Land, and sales skyrocketed.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | November 20, 2004
A FRIEND tells me to always believe what you overhear from other passengers on a bus; this week I heeded that advice. A few weeks ago a bunch of Peabody Institute students climbed aboard a coach at 27th and St. Paul streets. They were carrying bound copies of the score of Cendrillon, Jules Massenet's version of Cinderella. The students were full of life and so intently happy to be performing. I eavesdropped on every word, of course, and discovered I was seated across from Dorothee, one of the overbearing stepsisters.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Andrew D. Green and Laura Vozzella and Andrew D. Green,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
The Maryland General Assembly's incoming freshmen lawmakers wrapped up a three-day tour of the state yesterday, professing a new appreciation for the needs of poor city residents, suburban commuters, public universities and tourism programs - and scratching their heads about how to support them all given the budget crisis. "You're at College Park and you see the wonderful things going on, and you come to Coppin State and you see the wonderful things going on ... ," said Del.-elect Steven J. DeBoy Sr. of Baltimore County.
NEWS
May 15, 1999
ALL good things must end, even "Homicide: Life on the Street." The television drama set here has been canceled for next season by NBC. That's a business, not artistic, decision and an inevitable one. The 122nd episode, Friday, is to be the last ever.Seven seasons is not bad for a series that won with critical acclaim. Along the way, it did wonderful things. The hand-held camera brought a gritty realism.This was notable fiction based on a depressing nonfiction book, "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets," by then-Sun reporter David Simon.
FEATURES
By Eve Bunting | August 26, 1998
My backpack's big,my backpack's blue,my backpack's very nearly new.Grandma sent it in the mail.She bought it at a garage sale.She says by now I'm big enoughto fill it with important stuff.I'll put my teddy bear inside.He'll like a little backpack ride.Here's my train.I'll take my blocks.I'll take my brother's baseball socks.I think I'll take his catcher's mitt -he keeps it soft with lots of spit.My mother hangs her keys up high,but I can reach them if I try.I'll take a cookie and a spare -one for me and one for bear.
BUSINESS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 1997
Brooklyn may be across the river like the New York borough for which it was named, but it is convenient to most every place around Baltimore.The Rev. Richard Andrews, pastor of Brooklyn United Methodist Church, says you can get to downtown Baltimore by car or light rail "in five or 10 minutes," and George J. Gonce, who has operated a funeral home that straddles the Baltimore City-Anne Arundel County line for 46 years, says the highway network makes Brooklyn...
FEATURES
By Eve Bunting | August 26, 1998
My backpack's big,my backpack's blue,my backpack's very nearly new.Grandma sent it in the mail.She bought it at a garage sale.She says by now I'm big enoughto fill it with important stuff.I'll put my teddy bear inside.He'll like a little backpack ride.Here's my train.I'll take my blocks.I'll take my brother's baseball socks.I think I'll take his catcher's mitt -he keeps it soft with lots of spit.My mother hangs her keys up high,but I can reach them if I try.I'll take a cookie and a spare -one for me and one for bear.
BUSINESS
By DeWitt Bliss and DeWitt Bliss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 1997
Brooklyn may be across the river like the New York borough for which it was named, but it is convenient to most every place around Baltimore.The Rev. Richard Andrews, pastor of Brooklyn United Methodist Church, says you can get to downtown Baltimore by car or light rail "in five or 10 minutes," and George J. Gonce, who has operated a funeral home that straddles the Baltimore City-Anne Arundel County line for 46 years, says the highway network makes Brooklyn...
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
Emil and Rufat Israfilbekov would be just two more young Baltimore boxers with their eyes on the big time, except for a few things that, well, sort of set them apart.Such as physique: Rufat is 6 foot 4 and fights at 154 pounds; Emil is 6 foot 1 and 147. Some of their opponents have to stand on tiptoes to land a punch.Such as personalities: Scrupulously polite and self-effacing, they appear about as aggressive outside the ring as a couple of shy graduate students of biochemistry.Such as nationality: They are undoubtedly the first Azerbaijani-American fighters most fans have ever seen.
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