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By Annie Korzen | December 12, 2007
I don't much care for films that celebrate "small-town values." I always feel judged, even personally attacked, by these movies. When the restless Jenny in Forrest Gump leaves town and ends up an ex-junkie dying of AIDS, I read it as a threat to any woman who doesn't stay put and marry the town idiot. This time of year, I'm inevitably confronted with another movie that really disturbs me, It's a Wonderful Life. Yes, Jimmy Stewart is captivating and Donna Reed is radiant, but I find the story very depressing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
If he was always billed as "James" Stewart, why did movie lovers know him as Jimmy? James jibed better with his ethical authority and physical height (6 feet, 31/2 inches), but Jimmy suited the actor's down-home casualness and emotional transparency, his soft-shoe timing and his uncanny knack for spontaneous comedy- drama. He let audiences see right through him. Stewart could be a master of ingratiating wool-gathering. But he could also cut and sting. Few have approached the rage and anguish Stewart fearlessly plumbed in films such as "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946)
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SPORTS
By The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
Only the day before, Ellicott City's Beatrice Capra was an unknown, unseeded wild card playing her first main-draw Grand Slam tennis tournament at the U.S. Open. But Thursday afternoon she changed all that. With fans overflowing the Grandstand Court and cheers of support ringing in her ears, Capra came from behind to upset No.18 seed Aravane Rezai of France, 7-6, 2-6, 6-3, and became the latest starlet on the New York tennis stage. "Oh, my gosh!" said Capra, 18, several hours after the match.
SPORTS
By The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
Only the day before, Ellicott City's Beatrice Capra was an unknown, unseeded wild card playing her first main-draw Grand Slam tennis tournament at the U.S. Open. But Thursday afternoon she changed all that. With fans overflowing the Grandstand Court and cheers of support ringing in her ears, Capra came from behind to upset No.18 seed Aravane Rezai of France, 7-6, 2-6, 6-3, and became the latest starlet on the New York tennis stage. "Oh, my gosh!" said Capra, 18, several hours after the match.
FEATURES
December 6, 1991
Toby's Dinner Theater begins their revived musical version of ''It's a Wonderful Life'' Dec. 11. Most of the cast featured in the 1988 production will return for the revival. It will be one of two current and local musical versions of the Frank Capra film classic. The other is being presented at Washington's Arena Stage.
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 1997
Strong voices and sappy lyrics combine to make "It's a Wonderful Life" a good sentimental evening for the whole family during holiday time.The musical version of the Frank Capra film classic appears at Toby's Dinner Theatre for the third time, continuing through Jan. 18.For the few who have not seen the movie, the story focuses on George Bailey, a man whose life never seems to go the way he has planned in the small town of Bedford Falls.In a moment of crisis, Bailey wishes he had never been born, and, with the help of angel Clarence, he gets to see his wish fulfilled.
SPORTS
By Jeff Rude and Jeff Rude,Dallas Morning News | February 22, 1992
ROANOKE, Texas -- Byron Nelson at 80 is a jukebox waiting for a quarter. Drop one in and the records spin in his mind, and the words keep coming at you in exquisite detail. Events of 50 years ago seem as fresh as this morning's dew, and dates and numbers are recalled as if cue-carded."You have the mind of someone 60," his wife, Peggy, has told him.No, Nelson's problem with 80 is not looking back. "I've had a wonderful life," he says. Rather, what worries him is fast forward. He has peeked ahead, and the possibility of senility scares him."
NEWS
By KAREN HOSLER | November 27, 1994
The balance of power between the White House and Congress may have officially tipped toward the Capitol when Newt Gingrich was featured last weekend in a television skit on "Saturday Night Live."Already we had a Gingrich 100-day agenda, a Gingrich transition team and plans for two days of gala Gingrich swearing-in festivities. But now the chief architect of the Republican takeover of Congress has earned himself such cult figure status, he's considered great material for popular entertainment.
NEWS
By Peter E. Dans | December 20, 1994
IT'S FASHIONABLE in some quarters to sneer at the current popularity of "It's A Wonderful Life." Pauline Kael, the former New Yorker movie critic, derided its sentimentality and that of other Frank Capra films like "Capracorn."Possibly because he was an immigrant, Capra had a keen and transcendent feeling for America that allowed him to see into the hearts of Americans and discern the good. His voice resonated in a people suffering through the devastating Depression, which many believed resulted from greed, selfishness, self-indulgence and unchecked power.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | December 11, 1992
Just in time for the holidays, when "It's A Wonderful Life" i showing 24 hours a day somewhere on cable TV, stores are selling a trivia book about the classic Christmas film.It's a wonderful idea, huh? A little stocking stuffer paperback, about the size of a videotape and priced at $10.Actually, the authors -- former child actors Jimmy Hawkins and Paul Petersen -- are themselves fodder for the fans of Hollywood trivia.At the age of 4, Mr. Hawkins played Tommy Bailey, the younger son of Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed, in "It's a Wonderful Life."
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 17, 2009
If you've seen Freaky Friday, Vice Versa or even It's a Wonderful Life, you've already seen 17 Again. Except you've seen it done better. Yet another tale of adults revisiting their youths and becoming better people for it, 17 Again errs not only by covering such well-trod ground, but also by doing so through a main character - played by a game but ill-served Zac Efron - who's about as dense as they come. That makes for a protagonist who's more irritating than amusing, never good news for a comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
It's a well-established axiom that theater critics have hearts that are three sizes too small. How else could we skewer productions that folks in the audience - including the 5-year-old sitting on my lap - wholeheartedly enjoy? Such is the quandary facing this reviewer of the first national tour of D r. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas, which launched Thursday at the Hippodrome Theatre. Aspects of this holiday production that faithfully re-create the beloved children's book and television program - the scenery, costumes and special effects - as well as Stefan Karl's performance as the Grinch, are superb.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | December 21, 2007
It's not exactly in keeping with the holiday sprit, but ... A double feature of locally produced horror films is set for tonight at the Hamilton Arts Collective, 5440 Harford Road. Jamie Nash and David Thomas Sckrabulis' Two Front Teeth features a zombie Santa Claus, a dangerous flying creature with a glowing nose and a conspiracy-obsessed tabloid writer. Chris LaMartina's Book of Lore, named best horror feature at September's ShockerFest International Film Festival, focuses on a dead girlfriend, the ensuing murder mystery and a town's sordid past.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2007
The Senator Theatre's annual holiday twin bill, with proceeds going to the Maryland Food Bank, is set for Sunday. It's a Wonderful Life, with Jimmy Stewart getting a healthy dose of holiday self-worth, courtesy of the good folks of Bedford Falls, will show at 11 a.m., 3:45 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., while Alastair Sim's take on that classic humbug Scrooge, A Christmas Carol, will show at 1:45 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Admission is $6, or $6 worth of nonperishable food....
NEWS
By Annie Korzen | December 12, 2007
I don't much care for films that celebrate "small-town values." I always feel judged, even personally attacked, by these movies. When the restless Jenny in Forrest Gump leaves town and ends up an ex-junkie dying of AIDS, I read it as a threat to any woman who doesn't stay put and marry the town idiot. This time of year, I'm inevitably confronted with another movie that really disturbs me, It's a Wonderful Life. Yes, Jimmy Stewart is captivating and Donna Reed is radiant, but I find the story very depressing.
NEWS
By Margaret Erickson and Margaret Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2007
Silence and darkness flooded the auditorium as a string of prayers emanated from above focusing on a single man, George Bailey. The pervading question: "What makes a man so desperate as to consider suicide on Christmas Eve?" River Hill High School's recent production of It's a Wonderful Life tells a tale of the triumph of love during difficult times and illustrates a newfound appreciation of friendship and life. Straying slightly from the original 1946 film by Frank Capra, the River Hill production of It's a Wonderful Life recounted the story of George Bailey, who is given a chance to reflect on his life and the effect he has had on others.
FEATURES
By Jay Bobbin and Jay Bobbin,Special to The Sun | December 10, 1994
It's an annual TV tradition . . . but this holiday season, unlike most years, there's only one place and time to see it.During the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas, one of the most available attractions on television has been watching "It's a Wonderful Life," director Frank Capra's 1946 movie classic starring James Stewart and Donna Reed.Because the copyright on the film had lapsed, any station that could get a print could show it without paying fees -- probably the primary reason for the countless airings it used to have.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A few minutes into "A Wonderful Life," a host of roller-skating angels glides across the shiny celestial blue stage. Instantly, you realize this Arena Stage musical has found the thing an adaptation must find to succeed -- a way to improve on the original.The original, of course, is Frank Capra's beloved 1946 Christmas movie, "It's a Wonderful Life." Admittedly, the improvement is a small one: Librettist Sheldon Harnick and director Douglas C. Wager have added, or at least enhanced, the element of comedy.
FEATURES
December 8, 2006
WHAT YOU SAY I enjoy several holiday movies as part of my Christmas traditions. A Christmas Carol and A Christmas Story are musts while doing last-minute wrapping and waiting for the kids to go to sleep. A Charlie Brown Christmas, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and The Year Without a Santa Claus are great to watch cuddled up with the kids in the big chair. But my all-time favorite holiday film is It's a Wonderful Life. The reason is the story shows the beauty of family love. Family is what makes the shopping, cooking, wrapping, decorating, card-writing -- all the details of Christmas -- worth it on that day. Katie Cole, Kingsville It's a Wonderful Life with Jimmy Stewart has always been my favorite holiday story year after year.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | December 1, 2006
Videos made by youngsters from Reservoir Hill will be screened Thursday at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave. The short films include one featuring animated food and another centering on a straightforward discussion between area youth and the police. If that isn't enough to attract you, consider this: The evening includes food! Dinner will be served at 7 p.m., with the films starting one hour later. Tickets are $15, free for young people accompanied by a paying adult.
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