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By TIM BAKER | September 5, 1994
I've been having this recurring nightmare. It's always the same thing. I'm sitting at the breakfast table. I open my newspaper. There's a full-page ad. The headline blares: WonderJockGoes on SaleMonday at Noon.I'm standing in a long line at a men's store. Hundreds of other guys are there. We're all buying these new miraculously uplifting jockey shorts. Some men are putting them on before they even leave the store.In my dream I'm trying to put on a pair too. But they don't seem to fit. I can't get comfortable in the underwire foundation.
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BUSINESS
By Daniel Taylor and Daniel Taylor,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
The Waltherson neighborhood in Baltimore has been around since the 1920s and its style hasn't changed much since then. But sometimes having a constant like that is a good thing -- at least that's how it is for some residents in this northeastern region of the city. "It has stayed very nice," said Kathy Rogers, a former president of the Waltherson Improvement Association and a 38-year resident of the community. "I grew up here, and every time I consider moving, I think to myself, why move?
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
Have no fear, Wonderbra is here.The current superheroine of the lingerie galaxy has flown into Gotham and is poised to save American women from the evil forces of . . . gravity.Once available only across the Atlantic, the Wonderbra -- which has pushed up, padded out and created cleavage for even waif model Kate Moss -- debuted in New York this week with promises of nationwide availability in August. But already, other companies' versions of the bra are flying out of stores across the country in a testament to the enduring belief that less can indeed be more.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 29, 1994
Washington--Spend 30 minutes with Dolly Parton, and two words come to mind: Too much.Too much hair, too much makeup, too much cleavage, too much giggling, too much smiling, too much enthusiasm.Too much Dolly.Which is just fine with Ms. Parton, who has used her love of excess to become to country music what Liberace was to classical piano. Her voice alone probably would have earned her fame in Nashville, where she's been a staple for more than three decades. But it's the big hair, huge chest, gaudy clothes and acres-across smile that have moved her beyond pop-star status to pop icon.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | February 27, 1994
I wish to discuss a serious threat to our national security now being posed by a foreign brassiere.It's called the "Wonderbra." I found out about it via an article in the New York Times written by Emily Prager, who comes right out and states that she does not have any cleavage ("I have no cleavage" are her exact words).This is why she was interested in the Wonderbra, which is apparently a legend in the fashion community. It has been manufactured and sold for over 30 years in Great Britain, where it is extremely popular because it makes women appear to have a larger, more uplifted set of fashion accessories.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 29, 1994
As a male person of the '90s, I find myself troubled. And it's all because of the Wonderbra, which is not to be confused with Wonder Woman, who doesn't need one.The Wonderbra is the new-fangled device that creates cleavage for the cleavage challenged. Maybe cleavage doesn't take it far enough. The Wonderbra gives a woman cleavage in much the way that erosion gave Arizona the Grand Canyon.Yes, it molds and shapes and pushes up, up, up. It's the Apollo missile of bras. It's got more wires than Bell Atlantic, and, if you trust the publicity, is the greatest scientific advance since cable TV.Here's what all the fuss is about: The Wonderbra is supposed to make Kate Moss look like Dolly Parton.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1994
In the fitting room of Hecht's in Towson yesterday, Nancy Shaffer and Ruth Ann Brindley were comparing notes on the Wonderbra."Oh my God," said Ms. Brindley, slipping into a champagne-colored model. "I feel like Glenn Close in that movie . . . 'Dangerous Liaisons.' ""It's wild.""And so sexy.""I'm sold."Count them among the many sold on the world's most ballyhooed undergarment, the Wonderbra, which arrived in Baltimore yesterday. Since waif supermodel Kate Moss revealed that even she got cleavage with the mega-engineered bra, women have been clamoring to buy what nature didn't give them and surgery no longer safely can.Virtually every fashion magazine has gone ga-ga over the British export that made its American debut in May, and stores have been swamped by demand for the padded push-up with its 54 components -- or one of the lacy imitators it's inspired.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 29, 1994
Washington--Spend 30 minutes with Dolly Parton, and two words come to mind: Too much.Too much hair, too much makeup, too much cleavage, too much giggling, too much smiling, too much enthusiasm.Too much Dolly.Which is just fine with Ms. Parton, who has used her love of excess to become to country music what Liberace was to classical piano. Her voice alone probably would have earned her fame in Nashville, where she's been a staple for more than three decades. But it's the big hair, huge chest, gaudy clothes and acres-across smile that have moved her beyond pop-star status to pop icon.
BUSINESS
By Daniel Taylor and Daniel Taylor,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2004
The Waltherson neighborhood in Baltimore has been around since the 1920s and its style hasn't changed much since then. But sometimes having a constant like that is a good thing -- at least that's how it is for some residents in this northeastern region of the city. "It has stayed very nice," said Kathy Rogers, a former president of the Waltherson Improvement Association and a 38-year resident of the community. "I grew up here, and every time I consider moving, I think to myself, why move?
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | November 2, 1994
Designers at the New York spring collections are showing visible panty lines. It's all part of fashion's backward movement of the moment. Last year it was thongs and G-strings, but having exposed supermodel backsides to the glare of paparazzi flash, the fashion-jaded are looking elsewhere for excitement.It's to the '50s and your mother's underwear, when respectable girls had never even heard of bikinis and their bottoms were all covered up by drawers with cute lolly and spanky names.That's the new contour, the new hot pants are rounded to cut in at the thigh.
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | September 5, 1994
I've been having this recurring nightmare. It's always the same thing. I'm sitting at the breakfast table. I open my newspaper. There's a full-page ad. The headline blares: WonderJockGoes on SaleMonday at Noon.I'm standing in a long line at a men's store. Hundreds of other guys are there. We're all buying these new miraculously uplifting jockey shorts. Some men are putting them on before they even leave the store.In my dream I'm trying to put on a pair too. But they don't seem to fit. I can't get comfortable in the underwire foundation.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1994
In the fitting room of Hecht's in Towson yesterday, Nancy Shaffer and Ruth Ann Brindley were comparing notes on the Wonderbra."Oh my God," said Ms. Brindley, slipping into a champagne-colored model. "I feel like Glenn Close in that movie . . . 'Dangerous Liaisons.' ""It's wild.""And so sexy.""I'm sold."Count them among the many sold on the world's most ballyhooed undergarment, the Wonderbra, which arrived in Baltimore yesterday. Since waif supermodel Kate Moss revealed that even she got cleavage with the mega-engineered bra, women have been clamoring to buy what nature didn't give them and surgery no longer safely can.Virtually every fashion magazine has gone ga-ga over the British export that made its American debut in May, and stores have been swamped by demand for the padded push-up with its 54 components -- or one of the lacy imitators it's inspired.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 29, 1994
As a male person of the '90s, I find myself troubled. And it's all because of the Wonderbra, which is not to be confused with Wonder Woman, who doesn't need one.The Wonderbra is the new-fangled device that creates cleavage for the cleavage challenged. Maybe cleavage doesn't take it far enough. The Wonderbra gives a woman cleavage in much the way that erosion gave Arizona the Grand Canyon.Yes, it molds and shapes and pushes up, up, up. It's the Apollo missile of bras. It's got more wires than Bell Atlantic, and, if you trust the publicity, is the greatest scientific advance since cable TV.Here's what all the fuss is about: The Wonderbra is supposed to make Kate Moss look like Dolly Parton.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
Have no fear, Wonderbra is here.The current superheroine of the lingerie galaxy has flown into Gotham and is poised to save American women from the evil forces of . . . gravity.Once available only across the Atlantic, the Wonderbra -- which has pushed up, padded out and created cleavage for even waif model Kate Moss -- debuted in New York this week with promises of nationwide availability in August. But already, other companies' versions of the bra are flying out of stores across the country in a testament to the enduring belief that less can indeed be more.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | February 27, 1994
I wish to discuss a serious threat to our national security now being posed by a foreign brassiere.It's called the "Wonderbra." I found out about it via an article in the New York Times written by Emily Prager, who comes right out and states that she does not have any cleavage ("I have no cleavage" are her exact words).This is why she was interested in the Wonderbra, which is apparently a legend in the fashion community. It has been manufactured and sold for over 30 years in Great Britain, where it is extremely popular because it makes women appear to have a larger, more uplifted set of fashion accessories.
FEATURES
By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Dallas Morning News | February 16, 1995
The latest fashion innovation is one of the oldest -- and most despised. Corsets, girdles and other garments designed to nip waists, tuck tummies and tighten thighs are shaping up as one of the biggest influences on current fashion.Body shapers have been around for not just centuries, but eons. Historians say women in ancient Crete had iron bands soldered around their midsections to achieve the "ideal" 12-inch waist.Now garments designed to squeeze, push and plump women's malleable parts to new dimensions of "perfection" are top news again in magazines, in lingerie departments and on feminists' hit lists.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | January 26, 1997
The dream dressFormal-wear manufacturers are anticipating a demand for this summer's ultimate wedding gown, a knockoff of last year's ultimate wedding gown. The Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy dress, which was front page in virtually every periodical in September, has caught the fancy of brides-to-be."Our version is certainly inspired, but not a copy," says Peter Noviello, who along with Sherrie Bloom designs the Chetta B label. "The bias asymmetrical cut with the trumpet hem puts the look across," he says of the devore velvet dress.
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